Acls?

  1. I've heard that most ICU's won't let you become certified in acls until about 1 year out? Anybody heard likewise? The reason I ask is that I tried to do it while in nursing school and they declined my request at employee education. I guess they fear me being liable for a patient death when I'm trained and able to run a code but still without licensure?
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Frigle
    You can get your ACLS certification through and outside company. It doesn't have to have anything to do with the hospital. Just google ACLS certification and you will most probably find someone in your area teaching a class.
  4. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from johnson.2614
    I've heard that most ICU's won't let you become certified in acls until about 1 year out? Anybody heard likewise? The reason I ask is that I tried to do it while in nursing school and they declined my request at employee education. I guess they fear me being liable for a patient death when I'm trained and able to run a code but still without licensure?
    Most ICUs that I have worked require ACLS either upon hire or in the 1st class available after hire.
  5. by   Irish 007
    Hi,

    I've never heard of that policy.. If you want to get your ACLS, go for it! Even if you pay out of pocket. Are you a RN working in a ICU? Your hospital should encourage you to go! Best wishes!!!
  6. by   CRNAGAL
    I did ACLS while a senior in nursing school. My goal was to get into critical care right out of school and I thought it would help. Because it wasn't part of my job role as a patient care tech, I had to pay out of pocket. Also, you would never be expected to run a code as a nursing student just because you had ACLS, but it would have been easier for you to assist during a code by anticipating the team's needs. I've never heard that ICU's didn't want you to get your ACLS for a year, rather they want you to have it within a year's hire. Hope that helps.
  7. by   RN724
    I would go get your ACLS. Even if your hospital doesnt allow u to have it. I have been a nurse for almost two years and completed my ACLS after 6 months of working the unit. It was the best thing I ever did. I am 23 years old and running codes just about every day I work. It is greta experience and it will help you critically think. I also reocommend PALS certification, though not required it is very informitive. You learn how to due IO insertions and pediatric intubation.
  8. by   RN1980
    i agree with crnagal, most icus that i know of want you to have it within 6mos -1yrs after you start working. our unit is alittle more stringent we require you get it within 3mos but 95% of the new people get it within a month cause we insrtuct our own classes at my hospital. i would'nt know what to think about an icu that did'nt want you to get it till after a yr, i think thats sort of weird...if i was you i'd get it as soon as i could get into a class.
  9. by   gasmaster
    Quote from johnson.2614
    I've heard that most ICU's won't let you become certified in acls until about 1 year out? Anybody heard likewise? The reason I ask is that I tried to do it while in nursing school and they declined my request at employee education. I guess they fear me being liable for a patient death when I'm trained and able to run a code but still without licensure?
    You can complete ACLS as a student, so why your education dept. wouldn't let you is beyond me. As an ACLS instructor x 15 years I can promise you that I've seen nursing students come through class on more than 1 occassion. Also, as an ICU nurse, I became an ACLS instructor within 6 months of graduating from school.

close