Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner - pg.2 | allnurses

Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner - page 2

Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner. There are many reasons why people should not become nurse practitioners. I will outline a short article stating why YOU should NOT pursue a nurse... Read More

  1. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    #13 3
    Quote from chillnurse
    I know I apologize. I'll edit my future posts. I'm always in too much a hurry to edit but I'll do it from now on to make it an easier read. I also don't think my word processor agrees with copy pasting to the forum lol.
    Just go back and edit your original post. It's a good read. Cleaning it up will make it that much better.
  2. Visit  uncnp profile page
    #14 0
    good post
  3. Visit  llg profile page
    #15 0
    Thank you, Chillnurse.
  4. Visit  BlueDevil, DNP profile page
    Quote from Retired APRN
    I'm not even going to try to be diplomatic.

    I worked and studied hard to become an NP. Hours and hours of classroom, personal study, research. Hours and hours of clinical work in outpatient and inpatient settings. Blood, sweat and tears.

    I really resent these schools with minimal requirements that are graduating minimally trained nurse practitioners. They and their graduates are lowering the standard and providing fodder to the people (especially the physicians) who don't "midlevels" to practice with any kind of autonomy. Looking at some of the programs out there, I don't blame them.

    It feels like many people are not taking the nurse practitioner role seriously, that they are just looking for a "higher" role than RN and they want it as fast and as cheaply and as easily as possible. Sorry, but I would not want someone like that treating me or my family members.

    Right. I'm going to go put on my body armor now and stand over there near the OP.
    I agree with you. There are a great many NP programs that need to be closed, beginning with the diploma mills which shall not be named. Most of these, List of for-profit universities and colleges - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia , for example. NP school should be as selective, competitive and rigorous as MD/DO programs. We aren't covering the same material, but that is no reason to accept such abysmally low standards for accreditation and practice.

    The OPs statments may or may not be true for every NP.
    Favorite specialty: I only want to provide primary care, I have no interest in any specialty as a full time endeavor. Within PC I do specialize in orthopedics; I do many procedures and see a great many sports med pts, including providing care for mx area athletic teams, but I would never leave PC to go to an ortho practice. I have no doubt I could walk into any ortho practice win town and get a job, but I don't care to.

    Pay cut: was not true in my case. I went from $39/hour to $65/hour + bonuses (which are 1/3 to 1/2 base salary) overnight.

    You have to learn an entirely new trade: Very true, but I would think this would go without saying.

    Another 30-70k in loans and other fees: This was not true for me or for anyone I know. Be smart.

    Time: I spent 2.5 years getting my MSN and 2.5 years getting my DNP. Quality takes time. I probably could have done it all in 4 years, but in this household, it is family first and I was not willing to neglect my family for the sake of finishing faster. I completed 94 graduate credit hours in 14 semesters. I then spent 9 months in an optional unpaid FP Residency. It is not a race.

    Labels and role confusion: this has never happened to me. People have asked me to clarify my role, and I am happy to do so, but I've never had the kind of conflict or personal turmoil alluded to here.

    Poor support from licensing agencies: Yes, as above. Mediocrity should not be rewarded. you don't get a trophy, or a NP license just for showing up.
  5. Visit  Riburn3 profile page
    #17 1
    BlueDevil nailed it. Paycut is the only real plausable downside of that entire list, and it likely only applies to a select few. Just about everything else applies to regular nursing as well, and at that point you're opening up a different can of worms.
  6. Visit  zmansc profile page
    #18 1
    I would love to see the standards for accreditation and practice increased. I think there are a number of ideas on ways to do this. Whatever changes get made should be made to all programs across the board. Those programs that are rigorous, will step up to the plate, and those that are not will not be able to meet the new standards and will get closed down.
    I do think that there is often a rush on this site to claim, were different than the medical model of education and therefore we are inferior and we should change toward that model. I would disagree with that, in that I think our difference is one of our strong suits. I don't believe the medical educational model is the only way to be educated as a provider, and I believe we have strengths and differences that are worth nurturing.
  7. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    #19 1
    DNP,I cannot imagine making 65 bucks an hour as an NP. You are making more than some of the CRNAs at the hospital I work. However, didn't you say in a previous thread that your facility is unusual in that it pays NPs and MDs with similar experience the same pay rate?As for this thread, OP makes a good point in that becoming an NP has its draw backs.
  8. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    #20 4
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    DNP,I cannot imagine making 65 bucks an hour as an NP. You are making more than some of the CRNAs at the hospital I work. However, didn't you say in a previous thread that your facility is unusual in that it pays NPs and MDs with similar experience the same pay rate?As for this thread, OP makes a good point in that becoming an NP has its draw backs.
    With productivity, I am over $65/hr average as well.
  9. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    #21 2
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    DNP,I cannot imagine making 65 bucks an hour as an NP. You are making more than some of the CRNAs at the hospital I work. However, didn't you say in a previous thread that your facility is unusual in that it pays NPs and MDs with similar experience the same pay rate?As for this thread, OP makes a good point in that becoming an NP has its draw backs.
    In some job markets...of course the cost of living compares...bedside nurses with experience make $60.00 plus, plus in the Boston area. I know that is a fact personally.

    So yes it is possible for a FNP to make that.
  10. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    #22 0
    Quote from chillnurse
    I know I apologize. I'll edit my future posts. I'm always in too much a hurry to edit but I'll do it from now on to make it an easier read.

    I also don't think my word processor agrees with copy pasting to the forum lol.
    No it doesn't...sorry. Firefox works best for me. If you can't edit...report it we can do that for you.
  11. Visit  chillnurse profile page
    #23 3
    Thanks, I shall fix it as soon as I get home on an actual computer. The pa and nP in the ER group where i am make about 65 an hour. Ones in pain clinic make 60-80 + an hour, but that does not really county in regards to what most of us are interested in. The dr i work for basically told me I have the ability to pull a pretty high salary if i see a good amount of patients. That and he doesn't want to hire any other nps at the moment since he has had some bad experiences with new graduates and it will cost him 22000 to add another license to his ERH system. And the cost of living is pretty low where I am at in KY.

    My area is pretty good for NP. rns where i live start off at 19 an hour. pretty terrible. But it is because there is a flood of RNs since its like the only major the local comm college has that is worth a hoot.
  12. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    #24 5
    If you work in a pain clinic you earn every bit of that money. Tough job.
  13. Visit  Ally082 profile page
    #25 6
    This reminds me of another post/blog I saw somewhere else except it was, "Why you don't want to become a PA". This post, just like that one gets its point across to the intended audience who are people like me currently researching career paths.

    To people who are already in the field of nursing it may seem offensive in some way but understand it is meant to be an eye opener for me and my peers who have BIG dreams and lots of assumptions regarding what majors to pursue and why, then educating ourselves on such things.

    I am not a traditional student, I'm in my early thirties and some of the things that my fellow students who are more than decade younger than me seem to think about building and growing a career are just not realistic. They think that they can go from point A to C and find ways to bypass B all while making boat loads of money and OPENLY sharing stories of their Xanax and Adderall popping along the way (with no rx mind you) and doing little research into the career choices they make and ultimately end up disappointed.

    By the way some of these people think the NP job is some what similar to an RN with more money, a rx pad and a title change, so I'm not surprised the OP made reference to that.

    So thank you for providing some insight to a potential nursing student. I will pay more attention to school accreditation standards and stay open minded about salary expectations for my particular market here in Philly.
    Last edit by Ally082 on Mar 16, '14

close