University of Arizona BSN-DNP - page 5

by rachelaleanRN2B

16,129 Views | 64 Comments

Is anyone enrolled or been accepted into The University of Arizona's BSN-DNP program. I've been accepted into the Fall program and I would like to know how the program set up is and what to expect. Thanks, Rachel... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from LaurelV
    I am curious.... how can a new nurse be an effective DNP... it takes time and experience to develops critical thinking skills..
    Although I'm not a new nurse, I will say, there are plenty of new grads who know leaps and bounds over veteran nurses stuck in their ways. Critical thinking is developed in undergrad studies. But hey, remember as you said. Everyone worked hard to get there, and the program didn't just accept everyone.
    SL2014 likes this.
  2. 1
    I found that some experienced nurses new what worked in certain situations but not WHY they worked or any of the patho surrounding it. Some of the new grad nurses new what was happening and the patho but didn't know the intervention. Once they learned the intervention they had the complete picture. I think a year or two of med surg is good to help solidify concepts but not too long as to forget the science behind -why-. That said I think working med surg is just a favor to yourself because it is intense studying up close and personal of diseases and medications! I don't think it is necessary at all tho. I've known too many NP's who have gone straight through and say they'd recommend it. They feel comfortable about five years out which is pretty common even for RNs with experience be amuse the job is so different.
    SL2014 likes this.
  3. 0
    I have to respectfully disagree with you on several points. If you are fresh out of a BSN program, you should have plenty of didactic knowledge. The key is being able to QUICKLY assess a situation and determine both the outcome and intervention. In nursing school, the seed of critical thinking is planted, but it cannot sprout and grow without practical experience. An NP in alot of cases is independent and should posess both experience in diagnostics and the ability to arrive at an appropriate intervention, but I am not saying that NP's without experience cannot function. In the unit where I presently work, we do not hire nurses without at least 3 years of experience, preferably in a telemetry unit. The learning curve is huge, and lives are at stake. Having said that "baby" nurses who become NP's could benefit from being mentored or "paired" with an experienced NP. As I have said before, we have all worked hard to get here, even those without experience, but the nurses with experience will have a much shorter learning curve when first employed as DNP's.
  4. 0
    I would agree that acute care nurse practitioners need more experience. I wouldn't know how much. Primary care I hear is a different animal.
  5. 0
    Hello,

    As you have disagreed with us, I would also like to disagree with you. While I believe that nursing experience is extremely beneficial in becoming an NP it is not necessary by any stretch of the imagination. First of all, being a nurse practitioner and being a floor nurse are two totally different professions with different scopes or practice, different responsibilities and different types of critical thinking. Being a nurse practitioner requires critical thinking in regards to pathophysiology, pharmacology, and problem solving in a wholistic way. Being a floor nurse is critical thinking in a whole different light- multi-tasking, clustering care, anticipating needs etc.


    I LOVE old nurses. I had a preceptor who was an "old nurse" and she was amazing. She could handle anything, she always knew "what to do in a situation", however she once told me that giving a patient guiafenesin through a feeding tube was inappropriate because it "works by coating the throat". When I went to intermittently suction a patient she said "I don't care what you learned in school, this is real world".

    While this nurse is amazing at being a floor nurse, after 35 years of nursing she does not understand the pharmacology of a simple, common, OTC drug. She also had ZERO knowlege of EBP or facility policy. I do not bring up this point to insult her in any way but just to let you know that just because someone is good at being a floor nurse does not mean they have "superior critical thinking skills" and could be a better NP.

    All of this being said, my goal has always been to be a nurse practitioner. I like being a floor nurse, but it is VERY hard for me. There is so much stuff going on. So many people pulling you in different directions, so many things to do and remember. While I am a mediocre floor nurse, I will be an AMAZING nurse practitioner. I have also, since working in a hospital, decided to change from ACNP to FNP because I believe that I have more to offer to each individual patient in a primary care setting versus an acute care setting.

    Now, I understand that this will fall on deaf ears. I do not care to change your opinion, it is yours to have. I am just letting you know that I will be a GREAT nurse practitioner, just watch.

    As a final note: If you are an "experienced nurse" you should have learned something in all of your years: You cannot make broad assumptions about people or their abilities because every person and every situation is unique. You have no idea what a nurse with no experience is capable of, you have no idea what a veteran nurse of 45 years is incapable of.

    By making such statements you succeed in a few things:
    1. Discouraging others
    2. Feeding a mentality of "older is better"
    3. Breeding intolorence for people with different life experiences (and failing to realize that everyone has something unique to offer)
    4. Creating a rift between people with a common goal

    Perhaps instead of ridiculing the future practice of new graduate nurses who become nurse practitioners you should do something productive like:
    1. Identify specific barriers a new grad nurse may have and offer words of wisdom
    2. Inspire new grad nurses to do the best they can and be the best they can
    3. Be accepting of others' differences, help them use those differences to better patient care and the nursing profession
    The list goes on...

    Long story short: You aren't doing anything positive for yourself, others or the profession of nursing by instilling doubt, as an "experienced nurse"- you should know that.
  6. 0
    Quote from sarrah
    Hello,

    As you have disagreed with us, I would also like to disagree with you. While I believe that nursing experience is extremely beneficial in becoming an NP it is not necessary by any stretch of the imagination. First of all, being a nurse practitioner and being a floor nurse are two totally different professions with different scopes or practice, different responsibilities and different types of critical thinking. Being a nurse practitioner requires critical thinking in regards to pathophysiology, pharmacology, and problem solving in a wholistic way. Being a floor nurse is critical thinking in a whole different light- multi-tasking, clustering care, anticipating needs etc.

    I LOVE old nurses. I had a preceptor who was an "old nurse" and she was amazing. She could handle anything, she always knew "what to do in a situation", however she once told me that giving a patient guiafenesin through a feeding tube was inappropriate because it "works by coating the throat". When I went to intermittently suction a patient she said "I don't care what you learned in school, this is real world".

    While this nurse is amazing at being a floor nurse, after 35 years of nursing she does not understand the pharmacology of a simple, common, OTC drug. She also had ZERO knowlege of EBP or facility policy. I do not bring up this point to insult her in any way but just to let you know that just because someone is good at being a floor nurse does not mean they have "superior critical thinking skills" and could be a better NP.

    All of this being said, my goal has always been to be a nurse practitioner. I like being a floor nurse, but it is VERY hard for me. There is so much stuff going on. So many people pulling you in different directions, so many things to do and remember. While I am a mediocre floor nurse, I will be an AMAZING nurse practitioner. I have also, since working in a hospital, decided to change from ACNP to FNP because I believe that I have more to offer to each individual patient in a primary care setting versus an acute care setting.

    Now, I understand that this will fall on deaf ears. I do not care to change your opinion, it is yours to have. I am just letting you know that I will be a GREAT nurse practitioner, just watch.

    As a final note: If you are an "experienced nurse" you should have learned something in all of your years: You cannot make broad assumptions about people or their abilities because every person and every situation is unique. You have no idea what a nurse with no experience is capable of, you have no idea what a veteran nurse of 45 years is incapable of.

    By making such statements you succeed in a few things:
    1. Discouraging others
    2. Feeding a mentality of "older is better"
    3. Breeding intolorence for people with different life experiences (and failing to realize that everyone has something unique to offer)
    4. Creating a rift between people with a common goal

    Perhaps instead of ridiculing the future practice of new graduate nurses who become nurse practitioners you should do something productive like:
    1. Identify specific barriers a new grad nurse may have and offer words of wisdom
    2. Inspire new grad nurses to do the best they can and be the best they can
    3. Be accepting of others' differences, help them use those differences to better patient care and the nursing profession
    The list goes on...

    Long story short: You aren't doing anything positive for yourself, others or the profession of nursing by instilling doubt, as an "experienced nurse"- you should know that.
    Who are you even talking to?
  7. 0
    sarrah, I can understand why you would be defensive since you are a new grad and going straight into a DNP program. There have been posts that question a new nurses ability to quickly critically think, and that can be hard to hear. I congratulate you on your acceptance with the rest of us and have no doubt that with the drive you obviously have that you will work hard to be an amazing NP. I would caution you however, to maybe not be so defensive. As you have, I'm sure, seen on the floor, nurses are a tough bunch. We are hyper critical and vocal about it. You will have people question you about your ability to do this job many times as you go through this program, acknowledging that the experience that nurses have on the floor can be very valuable is important. Then stating that you will make up for that difference with your effort and determination will silence any critics. However, as a more experienced nurse I know for a fact that I have learned invaluable knowledge by working for a few years and that it will be very helpful in this program. Will it make me better then you? Nope. But it will give me an advantage. Please don't minimize my years of experience and knowledge to try and make a point about yours. We all have to work together for the next few years and if we go into it with some humility and excitement we will all be better for it. See you at RISE.

    MunkiRN
  8. 0
    This is what I was responding to:

    Apr 3 by LaurelV
    I am curious.... how can a new nurse be an effective DNP... it takes time and experience to develops critical thinking skills..


    I'm simply stating that saying that a new nurse cannot be an effective nurse practitioner because of lack of critical thinking skills is a broad, unfounded and discouraging statement to make.
    Last edit by SL2014 on Apr 12, '13
  9. 0
    Also, in regards to MunkiRN-

    That post wasn't directed toward you and I am not minimizing ANYONE'S years of experience. I'm simply stating that you can be an effective nurse practitioner without nursing experience. Yes, we do need to work together for the next few years and I fully intend to do so- which if you read my post is something very important to me. We are ALL working for a common goal, we can all work together and we all have great things to offer.

    I was stating in my post that to say someone won't be a good nurse practitioner because they are lacking experience is the opposite of what we should be doing- encouraging and supporting each other.
  10. 0
    I understand the post wasn't directed at me, thanks for clarifying though. I agree we all need to support each other, and it will be easier when the anonymity of Allnurses is gone. We will get to know each other well I am sure! Just might want to take questions about lack of nursing experience for NP's a bit more in stride, as I said before you will get them a lot. Taking it and moving on and proving them wrong will be better then getting defensive.


Top