Should I pursue an NP degree? I need advice - page 2

Hi, so I am currently in an accelerated BSN program to become an RN and I absolutely love it so far. My program offers a dual-degree NP path and I just was wondering if anyone could give me some... Read More

  1. by   CLjucovic
    Jules, yes! It's the unfortunate truth! These universities want the money and will push undergraduate nurses to pursue higher degrees before they've even graduated. I can foresee this becoming a great diservice to the patients and our profession, as the new grad nurses barely get a chance to hone the art of nursing, let alone figure out what their true passion in nursing is. Then they get into an APRN role and are expected to be experts without the much needed basic nursing experience.
  2. by   CLjucovic
    Vmm1995, you're very welcome! I currently live in NY as well, but in Eastern Long Island. I just interviewed for a PACU position at a Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan; fingers crossed I get it!!!

    As someone already mentioned above, it can't hurt to apply. If you come to find it's not your niche, then simply back out! And don't worry, whether a nurse or a provider, all patient interactions are meaningful, yet in different ways. I hope you get the opportunity to shadow an NP before making any final decisions, as this will help you decide if it's the right fit for you.

    If you choose the acute care NP route I highly recommend you get into a critical care fellowship/internship so that you get the most in depth training possible for the relatively short amount of time you'll be at the bedside. Oh, and a huge plus to working before going back to graduate school is the tuition reimbursement or free schooling you'll receive, especially if you work for the big New York City hospital systems.

    I also want to mention that most graduate nursing program core pre-reqs are the same across the board. So you may want to start in the NP track to get them out of the way and then eventually switch to the CNS, nursing education, or other M.S. track later down the line, as I know some who have!! *(First find out if you're able to easily switch programs or if you have to go through the whole rigmorale of an application process)*
  3. by   mushyrn
    I have been a nurse for nearly 6 years now, and am 1 1/2 years into an AG-ACNP program (on campus!). I would recommend working as an RN at least 1-2 years after graduation, at least to appreciate the foundation of your education and the role that level of caregiver has. If I ever make it to the actual NP career, I dread the day I encounter another NP who has never worked on the floors, treating nurses like they are a waste of time. I may get fired.
  4. by   broughden
    Quote from vmm1995
    I have no doubt that I am capable of handling those responsibilities.

    This ^ is the exact problem with these accelerated MSN-NP pipeline programs.

    Quite frankly and honestly you have no idea what your responsibilities will be or if you can handle them. As a first year ABSN student you dont even know if you can handle RN responsibilities yet.
    And then they want to turn around and with little or no clinical hours/experience beyond your ABSN program put you straight into a MSN-NP program?

    These programs are potentially sacrificing patient safety in pursuit of tuition money.
  5. by   GeminiNurse29
    Just my two cents:

    I've been a nurse for three years now, and frankly nursing school doesn't prepare you for the realities of nursing. MDs and PAs get extensive hard science education and training in what they'll be doing before they get to practice. I once read somewhere (can't remember where) that new nurses leave the profession within 3-5 years. Not saying there aren't good Nps who came straight from RN programs and didn't practice at all, but I would say focus on getting that first nursing job and learning all you can before rushing into anything else.

    Good luck!
  6. by   zoidberg
    I see this where I work. New grad ABSNs hitting the floors, already enrolled in their DNP, usually FNP program. The college pushes them to apply. I think they convince them that being an RN is not good enough or something like that. In general, the ABSN grads take a little longer to get the hang of things. It's such a short time frame to become an RN. Then to expect them to start transforming into an APRN while still barely surviving each shift as an RN? That doesn't sound like the way to become a competent practitioner.
  7. by   BirkieGirl
    Once again I second JulesA response, I agree to take some time. Get to know nursing. Get to know several areas. As a 20+ year vet, I can attest to the fact that there are SO many areas of nursing to learn about and become proficient in. In the end, if you love bedside and want to do it as a NP, it IS ABSOLUTELY POSSIBLE. Don't study in a FNP program, you'll want to study in an Acute Care NP program and practice in an acute care setting. I chose a FNP program because I worked in an office for many years and prefer it to the acute care setting. Good luck!
  8. by   vmm1995
    CLjucovic, thanks again! I think I am going to just apply, and after I graduate, work as an RN and enjoy it and try to learn as much as possible I also think I'm leaning towards the acute care speciality. If I change my mind about pursuing the NP path and want to back out, I hope this isn't an issue with NYU or they don't make me put down some crazy deposit as soon as I'm accepted (if I am)...

    Also, good luck with the Mt Sinai position! I am actually going to be volunteering there!
    Last edit by vmm1995 on May 4
  9. by   vmm1995
    Quote from broughden
    This ^ is the exact problem with these accelerated MSN-NP pipeline programs.

    Quite frankly and honestly you have no idea what your responsibilities will be or if you can handle them. As a first year ABSN student you dont even know if you can handle RN responsibilities yet.
    And then they want to turn around and with little or no clinical hours/experience beyond your ABSN program put you straight into a MSN-NP program?

    These programs are potentially sacrificing patient safety in pursuit of tuition money.


    I appreciate your response but I think I misspoke. When I said I have no doubt that I am capable of those responsibilities, I just meant that I am confident in myself that eventually, (not anytime in the near future), that I will someday be able to be a competent NP, if that's what I choose Since I am doing well and I am so passionate about nursing and have enjoyed my clinical experiences so much thus far, I look forward to immersing myself into every aspect of nursing and learning as much as I can! I am not in any rush to jump into being an NP - I look forward to being an RN and I think I'm going to love it, and hopefully NYU is preparing me well for those responsibilities. With NYU, they offer this dual-degree program, so unfortunately if I apply and get in, I'm required to work only a year as an RN, which I understand that many people think is not enough time. However, a positive is that once I enter the NP program, I'm also still working part-time.
  10. by   onthego782
    No rush...work as nurse..pay off bills..live life a little..then decide. The NP route is arguably over saturated in many areas with them not earning more than bedside nursing or other specialty areas when you factor in the debt. Yea, you get satisfaction of being a provider (which autonomy can vary depending on the state you work in). Be cautious on the particular NP program you go to..clinicals and other academic qualities are not equal. I have several friends working at bedside as NPs as there are no jobs available in their area. There are opportunities but you have to be willing to go to them.

    After you find an area you love..maybe find a NP that works in that particular area to shadow.

    Good thing about nursing is you have options.

    Best wishes
  11. by   PlayaChickRN
    Quote from CLjucovic
    I just interviewed for a PACU position at a Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan; fingers crossed I get it!!! *
    An NP in PACU? I'm currently an RN in pacu getting my graduate application together for NP and was wondering if there was such a thing as a PACU NP... The hospital I work for does not have one and we're the biggest PACU in the region (Trauma I). Could you expand on what a PACU NP role would look like? Very interesting!

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