I really need advice

  1. After stalking this website for years I've finally decided to create an account and post.

    I'm currently undergoing my BSN in upstate NY and have one year left until graduation. I've been President of my school's National Student Nurses Association chapter for 2 years, earned a few 4.0's but no lower than a 3.7 any semester (GPA is 3.85), participated in several leadership conferences and have been inducted into the nursing honors society. I feel my extracurricular involvement along with my decent GPA classifies me as a "well-rounded student."

    I was just offered acceptance into my college's MSN/FNP or MSN/PMHNP upon graduation, meaning I would start right after my bsn. The program is 2 years and allows students to work part or full time during the semesters so I would plan on working part time as an RN to gain experience. From leadership positions on campus and excelling in my clinical rotations I feel confident in my ability to pick up on bedside nursing manner very quickly while working part time if I do choose to go straight through. I had a full scholarship for undergrad and would come out of grad school theoretically "only" owing <40,000 for my FNP MSN- all clinical selections are provided for us.

    I'm leaning towards FNP because I love the idea of assessing and treating patients across the spectrum whether it be inpatient or outpatient. While PMHNP has also interested me for a while, I don't like the idea of losing that stethoscope/touch & feel type of practice we're taught in nursing school.

    I'd be 23 if I graduate with my FNP via this route and would have a little over 2 years of part-time RN experience. Will this make me marketable to employers? Will I even find a job with the way the new grad job market is portrayed on this website? I don't mind moving.

    Thank you in advance for all feedback, whether negative or positive
    •  
  2. Visit itswild profile page

    About itswild

    Joined: Jan '18; Posts: 5; Likes: 3
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    18 Comments

  3. by   brinksta
    NP school with no RN experience. This is the reason that NP's are starting to get a bad reputation. A school that would accept a new grad into an NP program is very concerning. This is oversaturating the field and bringing in NP's with no RN experience. I suggest working full time as an RN for at least a year before applying to programs. This is why the job market will continue to worsen...
  4. by   lwsoccjs
    Lol at brinksta's post. Seems hypocritical to make that argument with regard to your other posts about going to np school with 6 months experience.
  5. by   brinksta
    Quote from lwsoccjs
    Lol at brinksta's post. Seems hypocritical to make that argument with regard to your other posts about going to np school with 6 months experience.
    6 months ICU and you are coming off a neuro psych floor? LOL
  6. by   FNPOwlGal
    As you can tell, most of us have opinions about the amount of experience one should have prior to undertaking the NP role. I don't think 6 months is anything to brag about, and it's pretty equivalent to being a new grad IMO. Personally, I think that being a young NP isn't the best for starting out as an NP, however, you are the age that you are with the experience that you have -- I say go for it.
  7. by   lwsoccjs
    Quote from brinksta
    6 months ICU and you are coming off a neuro psych floor? LOL
    Good luck in your endeavor I'm sure you will need it. Here is a quote from your last post. As everyone can see you prefer to change your story whenever it suits you.

    "have a 3.4 GPA for my BSN last 60 hours. I have 3.1 overall. I have only 6 months working experience, but I did MedSurg and Psych with all different age groups during that short time? I have heard Chamberlain will accept anyone who meets min. requirements. Am I good to go?"
  8. by   traumaRUs
    Multiple posts have been removed. Please be mindful of the terms of service regarding personal attacks. Thanks.
  9. by   RNtoFNP20yrs
    Most CRNA schools will not accept students unless they have at least TWO years of ICU experience. It's my personal opinion that the same requirement should be standard for FNP or Acute Care CRNP or Psych NP.

    I've got 20 yrs RN experience. 12 yrs in ICU and 9 of those as a certified CCRN.
  10. by   rooseveltdunn
    You will be fine either way to be honest, you are young and your undergrad career is very solid, if possible shadow both FNP's and Psych NP's and see what you prefer. You will come across a ton of bitter people here who believe that RN experience is paramount (don't get me wrong it is very helpful to have it...but NP's and RN's do very different things) but in the end the choice should be based on what is best for you. Honestly you are going to have no problem finding work when you are done. You are young, in a big market and pretty well rounded with a solid background.
  11. by   lwsoccjs
    itswild,

    Back to the topic at hand I think you will be fine. You are off to a great start early on in your education. RN experience does not equal NP experience at all. In my experience the only section that the experience benefits is acute care if you plan on pursuing ACNP. FNP & PMHNP both are concerned with totally different care plans and courses of treatment compared to an inpatient perspective. My only advice is pick the hardest course load that you can handle with your current life circumstances. You will only better yourself by doing it. Do not worry so much about the $$$, in the end its pennies on the dollar in relation to your future. 23 is young compared to some professions but aligns pretty well with our PA brothers who graduate around 24-25. Keep your head high, continue to learn, and you will do great. Good luck.
  12. by   brinksta
    solrry
  13. by   CaliforniaNurse2BE
    I would suggest getting around two years of RN experience before starting to apply for schools. You will learn so much in those two years and a lot of it will be valuable in your future NP career.
  14. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from itswild
    After stalking this website for years I've finally decided to create an account and post.

    I'm currently undergoing my BSN in upstate NY and have one year left until graduation. I've been President of my school's National Student Nurses Association chapter for 2 years, earned a few 4.0's but no lower than a 3.7 any semester (GPA is 3.85), participated in several leadership conferences and have been inducted into the nursing honors society. I feel my extracurricular involvement along with my decent GPA classifies me as a "well-rounded student."

    I was just offered acceptance into my college's MSN/FNP or MSN/PMHNP upon graduation, meaning I would start right after my bsn. The program is 2 years and allows students to work part or full time during the semesters so I would plan on working part time as an RN to gain experience. From leadership positions on campus and excelling in my clinical rotations I feel confident in my ability to pick up on bedside nursing manner very quickly while working part time if I do choose to go straight through. I had a full scholarship for undergrad and would come out of grad school theoretically "only" owing <40,000 for my FNP MSN- all clinical selections are provided for us.
    Welcome officially to AN, glad you created an account after all those years. As you have probably realized, you have hit on a hot button issue right now, with some passionate arguments on both sides. Remember to take every response both in context and with a grain of salt (including this one).

    First, the facts. As much as the topic of RN experience in the NP role is discussed and debated there is no strong evidence (in terms of peer-reviewed published data) on either side. There are weaker published studies which so there is no difference in NP role socialization based on prior RN experience. In these studies (paraphrased) is that novice NP often cited prior experiences (be they life experiences or RN experience) as beneficial and those with RN experience tended to value their experience.

    Second, opinion. To put things in context, from a practicing NP who has been involved in both didactic and clinical education of NP students (as well as medical students) for a number of years including a number of "5-year" students which are simialr to the program you have been accepted to.

    Academics: Most of the schools that offer this type of program are higher quality and established programs. If you have done well academically at a quality school you should be able to handle the increased coursework and self-directed study, and the exams will be more difficult material but also more straightforward than NCLEX-style exams.

    Life Experience: As we know from the (little) evidence we have, is prior life experience is important in the new role. One thing I can say rather objectively is that "5-year" students I have worked with in the past have had much greater variability in this than older students and that is a concern and it is palpable in the clinical setting. Only you (and your preceptors/faculty) will be able to figure out if this is something that will hold you back or not.

    RN Experience: In short, from having worked with a lot of student NPs in both clincial and didactic settings is that some students need it and some don't. There is no blanket answer for this. There is some adamant opposition to the notion of NPs without prior RN experience but if you put that opposition in context, you'll find most of it comes from nurses that are not APRNs and/or are not involved in NP education. It is opinion without expertise. That being said, there are many practicing APRNs that highly value their prior RN experience.

    Always keep in sharp relief that academic success does not always accurately predict clinical success; even the best students don't simply start working in their RN job as experts, it takes years of dedication and hard work.

    I will post in response to the second part of you question a bit later.
    Last edit by BostonFNP on Jan 23

close