How will the DNP be integrated into NP education? - page 2

I'm sorry if this has been answered a million times. I looked at a lot of threads, but I couldn't find this specific information, but I'm new to this website so I'm still learning to navigate. Why are so many graduate programs... Read More

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    Thanks Tiffany. At least in this regard, time is on my side. I still have 3 years before I'm an RN.

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    As of 2015, it is the accrediting body for colleges of nursing (the American Association of Colleges of Nursing) that will only accredit DNP programs for Nurse Practitioners. You can find information at this website: American Association of Colleges of Nursing | DNP Fact Sheet This does not mean that state boards of nursing cannot or will not grant licenses to Masters Prepared NPs. In fact, right now in the state of Arizona, you can practice as an NP without a Masters degree if you earned you NP prior to a certain date. It is likely that there will be a "grand father" clause similar to that when the DNP becomes the normal avenue of certification and academic preparation. This is a very different issue compared to the BSN which has languished for decades. This HAS occurred and will be the norm in the future.
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    Please note: All of the public universities in Arizona, ASU, U of A, and NAU offer only DNP for nurse practitioners. However, the private universities are still offering the Master's degrees.
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    Quote from kindaquazie
    As of 2015, it is the accrediting body for colleges of nursing (the American Association of Colleges of Nursing) that will only accredit DNP programs for Nurse Practitioners. You can find information at this website: American Association of Colleges of Nursing | DNP Fact Sheet This does not mean that state boards of nursing cannot or will not grant licenses to Masters Prepared NPs. In fact, right now in the state of Arizona, you can practice as an NP without a Masters degree if you earned you NP prior to a certain date. It is likely that there will be a "grand father" clause similar to that when the DNP becomes the normal avenue of certification and academic preparation. This is a very different issue compared to the BSN which has languished for decades. This HAS occurred and will be the norm in the future.
    1. AACN is not an accrediting body. The two nursing accrediting bodies are CCNE and NLNAC. The CCNE accrediting standards do not require NP (not updated since 2009) do not require NP programs to be at the DNP level. They do state that DNP programs have to follow the consensus guidelines. The NLNAC standards have a similar amount of silence.
    2. There is no standard accreditation for NP programs. NP programs exist within schools of nursing which must be accredited by one of the two agencies listed above.

    As it currently stands there are three ways to change the minimum educational requirement for NPs.
    1. States change their requirements to DNP. (this would be on a state by state basis)
    2. Both certification agencies for a given certification change their requirement for certification to the DNP.
    3. Insurers (ie Medicare) require a DNP for reimbursement (this was what mandated the masters for NP)
    CCRNDiva and myelin like this.
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    Quote from kindaquazie
    As of 2015, it is the accrediting body for colleges of nursing (the American Association of Colleges of Nursing) that will only accredit DNP programs for Nurse Practitioners. You can find information at this website: American Association of Colleges of Nursing | DNP Fact Sheet
    The site you linked says nothing about "only accredit(ing)" DNP programs as of 2015. It talks about the AACN membership voting to endorse the proposal that the DNP become a requirement, and it talks about resources the AACN provides to help guide schools that choose to transition their MSN programs into DNP programs through the process, but nothing about any requirements.

    As already noted, the AACN is not an accrediting body; it is a voluntary professional organization that has no legal/statutory authority to make anyone do anything -- it can't even force its own members to do anything they don't choose to.
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    I, like you OP, have searched for some time with the same questions, without much of any answers. Thanks for posting it before me! =]
    However, I am already an RN with some experience so don't have a lot of time before 2015! You will probably be graduating at that time so try not to worry too much about this now and focus on your current studies =]
    Good Luck (while I shift through more posts)....!
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    I think requiring the DNP is a long way off. My perspective is I am in an ACPNP program. My certification exam has only been around since 2005. It is extremely hard to find appropriate faculty to teach my courses, because there simply aren't many experienced ACPNPs out there. To require all of the instructors be doctorally prepared would put a huge burden on the schools. I think most schools are working on a transition to a DNP program at some point, but it isn't something that can be done overnight. Nursing faculty is very difficult to recruit and retain. That is just 1 road block to mandating the DNP. I believe a DNP is mandated for CRNAs for 2025 (according to what I've read on AN), and while it may go that direction for NPs in the future, it won't happen by 2015.

    As to why there is so much resistance to the DNP, I think you can read through one of the many threads on it here. There are a lot of very good arguments with why the DNP in its current state is terrible.


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