Was going to earn my NP, but not anymore. - page 2

Now that the AACN is requiring nurse practitioners to have a doctorate's degree, I no longer plan to go on to become a nurse practitioner. Why? simple. Because some genious decided to force nurses that want to become an... Read More

  1. 0
    "According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf"

    It sounds like these decisions are based on the MSN prepared NP, not an NP w/ a doctorate degree.

    To Original Poster

    I'm with traumaRN---the BSN is still not a requirement, so don't get your knickers in a knot about a recommendation for a DNP. Based on history, it is HIGHLY unlikely a DNP will become a requirement any time soon.

    From a realistic standpoint- who would teach it? There are hardly enough MSN educators to teach BSN programs, let alone enough instructors for DNP programs.

    Perhaps, you would consider slowing down, taking a deep breath and reading more fact- based information from reliable sources and then decide what is best for you and your family.
    I wish you well in whatever you ultimately decide.
    Take care

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 1
    Quote from rmicu
    "According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf"

    It sounds like these decisions are based on the MSN prepared NP, not an NP w/ a doctorate degree.
    No it is based on a doctorate degree. I did some looking on the AMA website and it is targeted at anyone with a doctoral degree who is not a physician in a medical setting.
    BabyLady likes this.
  3. 1
    The more I read these, it is just another reason why the profession of nursing needs to GET ORGANIZED.

    There are more of us, than there are of them.

    Most RN's with a DNP, have spent JUST AS MUCH TIME in school as an MD grad, who has spent typically 4 years.

    So, why do they think they have more of a 'right' to use the title than we do? Clinical setting or not!!
    sandnnw likes this.
  4. 0
    In my research I have discovered that a university in my state offers a BSN to DNP track. The track lists three concentrations - ANP, FNP and PMHNP. I am still interested in becoming an advanced practictioner, but my interest is in Acute Care - ACNP. So, with the DNP, would that be ANP??

    The description given is for an "adult primary care" practitioner. I was really hoping to get ACNP as I have a very strong interest in working in ICU. Does anyone know what happens with the ACNP if/when the DNP requirement goes into affect?? Is that something that is regulated by the states as well?? Thanks as always for your helpful input. Be Blessed...
  5. 0
    Look at some other schools and see what others are offering in the way of DNP with concentration in ACNP...might be out there somewhere.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top