Was going to earn my NP, but not anymore. - page 2

by CrashVector 6,687 Views | 14 Comments

Now that the AACN is requiring nurse practitioners to have a doctorate's degree, I no longer plan to go on to become a nurse practitioner. Why? simple. Because some genious decided to force nurses that want to become an... Read More


  1. 0
    "According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf"

    It sounds like these decisions are based on the MSN prepared NP, not an NP w/ a doctorate degree.

    To Original Poster

    I'm with traumaRN---the BSN is still not a requirement, so don't get your knickers in a knot about a recommendation for a DNP. Based on history, it is HIGHLY unlikely a DNP will become a requirement any time soon.

    From a realistic standpoint- who would teach it? There are hardly enough MSN educators to teach BSN programs, let alone enough instructors for DNP programs.

    Perhaps, you would consider slowing down, taking a deep breath and reading more fact- based information from reliable sources and then decide what is best for you and your family.
    I wish you well in whatever you ultimately decide.
    Take care
  2. 1
    Quote from rmicu
    "According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf"

    It sounds like these decisions are based on the MSN prepared NP, not an NP w/ a doctorate degree.
    No it is based on a doctorate degree. I did some looking on the AMA website and it is targeted at anyone with a doctoral degree who is not a physician in a medical setting.
    BabyLady likes this.
  3. 1
    The more I read these, it is just another reason why the profession of nursing needs to GET ORGANIZED.

    There are more of us, than there are of them.

    Most RN's with a DNP, have spent JUST AS MUCH TIME in school as an MD grad, who has spent typically 4 years.

    So, why do they think they have more of a 'right' to use the title than we do? Clinical setting or not!!
    sandnnw likes this.
  4. 0
    In my research I have discovered that a university in my state offers a BSN to DNP track. The track lists three concentrations - ANP, FNP and PMHNP. I am still interested in becoming an advanced practictioner, but my interest is in Acute Care - ACNP. So, with the DNP, would that be ANP??

    The description given is for an "adult primary care" practitioner. I was really hoping to get ACNP as I have a very strong interest in working in ICU. Does anyone know what happens with the ACNP if/when the DNP requirement goes into affect?? Is that something that is regulated by the states as well?? Thanks as always for your helpful input. Be Blessed...
  5. 0
    Look at some other schools and see what others are offering in the way of DNP with concentration in ACNP...might be out there somewhere.


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