FNP vs ACNP in PA

  1. 0
    Can family nurse practitioners work in acute care in PA? I don't want to start the wrong program for what I actually want to do.

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 0
    From what I've been told in my current FNP program, we may be at risk if we accept certain positions in an acute care setting. I've seen many new grads accept positions within a hospital setting, or even ED. As an FNP, working in a fast track ED or urgent care setting is fine- working as a hospitalist is probably not, since our clinical hours are spent in primary care. A hospital can hire you, but chances are when push comes to shove, if there is a question about your education in a legal situation, you may be putting yourself at risk. Good luck!
  4. 0
    People need to stop pushing people into FNP programs just for "marketability"

    If you want to do inpatient hospital care, go to an ACNP program. Learning the skills you need to serve your patient population is more important than being marketable. FNPs learn a lot, but they do not do classes in critical care nor do they do clinicals inside the hospital. Become an ACNP.
  5. 0
    Quote from futureeastcoastNP
    FNPs learn a lot, but they do not do classes in critical care nor do they do clinicals inside the hospital.
    This is absolutely not true. I did almost 50% of my training in a in-patient and acute care setting. I work in both clinic and hospital settings now. I had both the education and experience to enter practice in both settings. The caveat is that while I cover unit patients, I do have an attending Intensivist sign off on them.

    Be careful about speaking so firmly about things you don't yet know or have experience with; it's dangerous for NPs to do that in practice.
  6. 0
    Boston -

    From your experience is 50% in acute settings higher than normal? I think the most I'll be able to do is about 25-30% in acute settings.
  7. 1
    Quote from zmansc
    Boston - From your experience is 50% in acute settings higher than normal? I think the most I'll be able to do is about 25-30% in acute settings.
    Probably. Depends on your program and your number of clinical hours; I graduated with double the "required" hours so this gave me extra flexibility with placements. Even at 25-30% you will be adequately prepared for entry to practice.

    As I have said before a novice NP is a novice NP no matter how you slice it. Clinical experience is nice but transition to practice is another game all together.
    zmansc likes this.
  8. 0
    I have no doubt that transition to practice will be another game, it's what keeps me studying when I want to do something else!
  9. 1
    Quote from zmansc
    I have no doubt that transition to practice will be another game, it's what keeps me studying when I want to do something else!
    That's the importance with picking the right practice to join, ideally one that has trained novice NP in the past and know what to expect! You will be well-prepared for entry but you won't know everything and the more supportive your environment the better you will be and the more you will enjoy your job.

    And remember by the end of your first year on the job you will have quadrupled your clinical hours. Lots of learning!
    zmansc likes this.


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