Which FNP programs are the shortest? - page 4

I have heard that Vanderbilt is one year? Georgetown is 16 months? Are there any other fast pace FNP programs out there that can be done in less than two years?... Read More

  1. by   Skudley
    If you knew anything which obviously you don't fast track is nothing to worry about worry about the people that spent 4 years to get their FNP. The top schools for nursing are fast tracked for future reference.
  2. by   JBMmom
    Quote from Skudley
    If you knew anything which obviously you don't fast track is nothing to worry about worry about the people that spent 4 years to get their FNP. The top schools for nursing are fast tracked for future reference.
    Wow, that was pretty harsh. People choose the programs they choose for any number of reasons, and suspecting their abilities based solely on that criteria is quite judgmental. There are probably excellent NPs from accelerated programs and four-year programs, conversely there are awful ones from both as well. People have different strengths and weaknesses across all professions, I would hope that those RNs that are choosing to further their education for some reason will find success in their new roles, however they completed their education.
  3. by   Skudley
    I agree with you what I said was more for the people stating that peop that are looking for a shorter program some how is less effective then a longer one. But if you have kids and working and what ever else factors that make you take longer to complete your NP is no problem but for people to say they wouldn't want to be treated by a student that did a one year program is porposperous. University of Pennsylvania Which is an Ivy League school FNP is 1 year full time program and many other great schools have 1 year programs.
  4. by   Dodongo
    Quote from Skudley
    I agree with you what I said was more for the people stating that peop that are looking for a shorter program some how is less effective then a longer one. But if you have kids and working and what ever else factors that make you take longer to complete your NP is no problem but for people to say they wouldn't want to be treated by a student that did a one year program is porposperous. University of Pennsylvania Which is an Ivy League school FNP is 1 year full time program and many other great schools have 1 year programs.
    Penn is 16 months for the FNP.

    I think either end of the spectrum is probably an issue. Too short and you obviously aren't getting enough clinical hours (an issue in all programs). Too long and you aren't going to be able to synthesize and integrate the information as it's coming in.

    Preposterous?
  5. by   RiaC
    Quote from Skudley
    I agree with you what I said was more for the people stating that peop that are looking for a shorter program some how is less effective then a longer one. But if you have kids and working and what ever else factors that make you take longer to complete your NP is no problem but for people to say they wouldn't want to be treated by a student that did a one year program is porposperous. University of Pennsylvania Which is an Ivy League school FNP is 1 year full time program and many other great schools have 1 year programs.
    I agree with you that a shorter level program does not necessarily mean it is less effective than a longer one, but I think you should also take into account the type of degree they are pursuing as well as what degree they have when starting. NP is a professional license and they can have either a MSN or a DNP.

    I've seen post-BSN to MSN NP programs start at about 1.5 years (give or take), but it may take longer for RNs without a BSN (e.g. Associate degree RNs) or shorter for RNs with a master's already getting their NP certification. Most post-BSN to DNP program I've seen start at 3 years full-time, 4 years part-time study. The NP program you are referring to from UPenn is a Master's degree (MSN) as opposed to a DNP which are longer.

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