FNP, pediatric rotation preparation

  1. 0
    Hi all,
    I will begin my pediatric rotation in August.
    Background, I have 5 years RN experience, 4 of which in the ICU. I have absolutely zero experience in pediatric nursing, besides my undergraduate rotation, which was not all that great.

    In between now and next semester, I'd like to review some topics related to peds so I can be somewhat prepared for clinical.

    Any advice on common illnesses that I should know, tips, tricks, the best resources, things you wish you knew before you started, etc?

    I love kids, and I'm thrilled to start a new rotation, but I have no children of my own yet, and my experience is seriously lacking (I don't even know normal pediatric vital signs, I feel clueless). Appreciate it!!!
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  4. 8 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    I would download a good drug information app so you can quickly look up pediatric dosages. As an NP student I found this helpful (that was back in the days of palm pilots!). Also, I would review abdominal complaints. I work in the ER and see a lot of kids for "tummy aches" while most of these just turn out to be GI viruses, there are some abdominal related complaints you need to be sure not to miss in kids (ex. appendicitis, intussusception).

    Last edit by DidiRN on Sep 10, '13 : Reason: Links removed
    moonischasingme1 likes this.
  6. 0
    Where will you be doing your peds rotation? Primary care? ER? Inpatient? A specialty?
  7. 0
    It isn't set yet, but more than likely primary care.
  8. 3
    If you're going to be doing a lot of well-child visits, the most important is to know the vaccination schedule inside and out, and developmental milestones for each age. You want to be very good at examining ears and throats and knowing normal from abnormal findings. We usually examine an infant or toddler in its mother's lap, and start with least invasive exams first (heart and lung sounds, tummy, then ears and throat).

    I learned from my ER preceptor to get a collection of small keychains that light up and make noise when you press a button. They really work magic at distracting and entertaining an uncooperative child.
    rgbrn, honeykrown, and moonischasingme1 like this.
  9. 2
    Quote from Jeanette73
    If you're going to be doing a lot of well-child visits, the most important is to know the vaccination schedule inside and out, and developmental milestones for each age. You want to be very good at examining ears and throats and knowing normal from abnormal findings. We usually examine an infant or toddler in its mother's lap, and start with least invasive exams first (heart and lung sounds, tummy, then ears and throat).

    I learned from my ER preceptor to get a collection of small keychains that light up and make noise when you press a button. They really work magic at distracting and entertaining an uncooperative child.
    Lol I had almost the exact opposite experience in pedi primary care.

    The first week I did a fair amount of well child visits. Knowing the developmental milestones is important. The vaccine schedules were in the room and the EMR so it wasn't essential to know the schedule, though you should definitely know the contraindications.

    After that it was largely sick visits once I was solo: I would do maybe 2-3 well visits and then 10-15 sick visits. Know manifestations, ddx, and tx/rx if the common ones: pharyngitis, croup, asthma, concussions, otitis, bronchiolitis, constipation, abd pain, sprains and strains, URIs.
    moonischasingme1 and nomadcrna like this.
  10. 0
    I'm doing pediatric np primary care. Ive always been a pediatric nurse so I'm
    Comfortable with kids. I would say get a copy of bright futures spiral pocket guide to help familiarize ur self with stages of development and well visits per age group.

    know ur vaccination schedules

    Common stuff I see are ear infections gastroenteritis, uti, asthma, allergies, strep, scabies, ringworm, fractures, eczema, uri, reflux, etc.

    And a ton of well visits



    I don't know what books ur using for your peds rotation. But pediatric ambulatory guide is good for common sick visits.
  11. 0
    There is always stuff you can look up in terms of conditions and treatments, but a lot of that you'll learn about from your preceptor depending on what types of patients you are seeing. I think the most important things to focus on before you start clinical is how to do a pediatric assessment and how it is different from an adult. Your approach to kids needs to be non-threatening and you need to not forget to assess things like the fontanel in 2 years and younger group. Also look over the different questions you have to ask for your history. You will need to ask a lot more questions regarding diet, birth history, vaccination history, family situation, etc. If you can do a good history and physical, your preceptor can help walk you through the diagnosis and plan part. I hope you enjoy your rotation. Kids are a challenge, but so fun!
  12. 0
    I bought a cheap otoscope on AMazon and practiced looking in the ears of friends's kids before the rotation started. Learning what normal vs abnormal throats and ears look like is pretty big but you'll get it. I'd agree that knowing milestones, vaccination schedules, and distraction are helpful. Of course, the schedule will probably be posted on the wall. I had a marked page of milestones in my pocket notebook. I learned a ton. Be prepared to write down useful little knowledge pearls!


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