Entry Level MSN

  1. 0
    upon completion of an entry level msn, will one automatically become an advanced practice nurse, more specifically, a nurse practitioner or would one have to go through a certification program for the desired advanced practice nurse roles (clinical nurse specialist, nurse practitioner, etc). i'm a bit confused about whether or not entry level msn prepare you for those certification or if you actually finish those certification upon completion of the entry level msn. can someone please clarify this for me and/or give me a better insight about becoming a nurse practitioner after an entry level msn?

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  2. 13 Comments...

  3. 0
    I applied to an accelerated BSN-MSN program for the fall and just went to their open house on Saturday. From the things they said at the open house, it sounds like you pick your specialization during your MSN courses and clinicals, and once you graduate with the MSN degree, you become a CNS, NP, CRNA, etc. I'm not positive about that, but that's the way the school presented it on Saturday. Hopefully there is someone on here that can give you a more confident answer!
  4. 0
    All NPs are MSNs but not all MSNs are NPs. Make sure your program is designed for perusing the NP certification exam at the conclusion of the program. This is a clinical focus vs a management or education focus.

    Also some programs offer only one NP track and others offer specialized training. CRNA programs are normally separate programs from NP.
  5. 0
    Moved to Pre-Nurse Practitioner Inquiry for more of a response.
  6. 2
    Ditto what de2013 said. There are some graduate entry level that are kindof akin to ABSN programs. They are intended for students who have a bachelors in another field, and the programs are quicker than those that are typical nursing programs. Might I also add, if it is a general master's degree, make sure it is a MSN if you intend to eventually be an advanced practice nurse (APN aka nurse practitioner, nurse midwife, etc). There are some master's entry level programs that grant the MN. The difference being that if you wanted to go from the MSN to an APN, you can simply go the post master's route. You cannot do this for the MN. There are extra classes required. This is simply a word of advice from a coworker who got her MN, was told she could simply do post-masters, and when she went to apply, found out that wasn't the case.... BUT that is all for the programs that include JUST the masters and NOT the specialty courses for a chosen field (i.e. pediatric NP, psych-mental health NP, family NP, nurse midwife, etc. etc. AFAIK there are barely any master's entry level programs to be a nurse anesthetist)

    Anywho! If you are interested in becoming an APN, most of these programs will have you indicate your specialty at the time of the application. These programs consist of 1 year to 1.5 years of general nursing courses before sitting for the NCLEX. THEN you take your master's level courses (the specialty courses in peds, midwifery, or whatever) to get your MSN. Then after graduation you take the boards to become whatever APN specialty you have chosen.

    Does that make sense? haha I wrote it kind of confusingly...I completed the application process last year and will be starting a similar program in the fall, so if you have any questions at all, feel free to let me know!
    vballtrumpeter and truth&love like this.
  7. 0
    Look at the master's degree the school confers.

    NP, CNS, CRNA (anesthetist), and CNM (midwife) are advanced practice nurses.

    CNL, or clinical nurse leader, is not an APN, nor are any of the management-type degrees or nurse educator.

    Some of the direct entry programs only have CNL as an option. Each individual school will be different. CNL is the advanced generalist and the one that makes the most intuitive sense to me to be a direct entry MSN (or even MN, master's in nursing).
  8. 0
    Hi folks,

    Thanks for an interesting thread. I have just applied for the MEPN (entry-level Masters) at UCSF. I would love to be a NP. I know it's a longshot because the program is so competitive but I have my fingers (and toes) crossed. I will also be applying to BSN programs.

    Does anyone have thoughts on the topic of the reputation of entry-level Masters nurses out there in the work world? I've heard some talk that it can be an issue if you don't have a BSN (which some programs, like UCSF, skip).
  9. 0
    Quote from scwolf
    Hi folks,

    Thanks for an interesting thread. I have just applied for the MEPN (entry-level Masters) at UCSF. I would love to be a NP. I know it's a longshot because the program is so competitive but I have my fingers (and toes) crossed. I will also be applying to BSN programs.

    Does anyone have thoughts on the topic of the reputation of entry-level Masters nurses out there in the work world? I've heard some talk that it can be an issue if you don't have a BSN (which some programs, like UCSF, skip).
    This will likely vary by school and area. Around here, there is a gradual trend that hospitals are not hiring masters students because they tend to get trained, work a year, and move to an NP job. The actual BSN issue isn't as big of a problem as you do have a prior BA/BS. If you can get a BSN on the way it's great but be aware that may effect your federal financial aid.
  10. 0
    I've heard similar issues with hospitals being wary of hiring MSN students, which makes sense from their standpoint (why invest in someone will leave soon). I'm currently applying for ELMSN programs, so hopefully I will be able to find a solid RN gig after the first year!
  11. 0
    Quote from scwolf
    Hi folks,

    Thanks for an interesting thread. I have just applied for the MEPN (entry-level Masters) at UCSF. I would love to be a NP. I know it's a longshot because the program is so competitive but I have my fingers (and toes) crossed. I will also be applying to BSN programs.

    Does anyone have thoughts on the topic of the reputation of entry-level Masters nurses out there in the work world? I've heard some talk that it can be an issue if you don't have a BSN (which some programs, like UCSF, skip).
    MEPN has an excellent reputation for producing quality NPs. I run into loads of MEPN grads working as NPs at all my clinical sites. You will not run into issues being hired as a NP without the BSN, as long as you have a MSN. However, if you're looking to work as a RN, I'd suggest another program for two reasons. One, we don't get the BSN, so that can hurt your chances at finding a RN position. Secondly, the market here (bay area) is a nightmare for new grad RNs and getting hired is extremely difficult, especially if you are starting advanced practice coursework and don't have time for a new grad residency.

    However, once you're a NP, I have seen few problems getting hired, especially in primary care or outpatient, especially if you're able to relocate. The market just sucks in the bay area, period. In-patient can be harder without RN experience, however, the MEPN program requires students who are likely going to work inpatient as NPs (like ACNPs) to work as RNs before completing the MSN. The people who have a hard time getting hired around here are those who come from professional programs (Kaplan, Phoneix, etc.)


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