Does it matter which FNP school I pick?

  1. Hello! I am getting ready to start an FNP program with Chamberlain University. I am just wondering - will it make a big difference if I go to a brand name school?

    I have also been in conversations with USC - which is a truly AWESOME brand name.

    The cool thing about USC is that they also take care of ALL clinical preceptors - which, from what I can tell, can be a MAJOR issue in NP school.

    I guess I am just a bit worried about reputation.

    If I go to Chamberlain - will I be less hire-able, coming out of FNP school? My goal is to be an ER-FNP, Urgent Care, or Hospice.

    Does Chamberlain have a reputation as being a second-rate school???

    Thanks for any advice!
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    What do you think is the answer to this? Easier to pick the program that has the best reputation for the tuition and fees that you can afford.
  4. by   llg
    The preceptor issue is huge. Don't take that lightly. I would never attend a school that expected me to find all my instructors (volunteers). I would expect the school to help out big time with arranging the required clinicals. The student is paying for an education -- the school should provide educational experiences -- and not just rely on the student to find volunteers to provide the actual clinical education.
  5. by   anne_marie_oregon
    Hi llg ... I agree about the preceptor issue. I currently work in the Emergency Department ... and I asked one of the ED physicians about this ... he said they are willing to precept students that would be interested in getting hired on with that ED group.

    I thought that was an interesting concept - and possibly a good way for me to get my 1st job!!!

    I dunno - lots of pros and cons. The cost of the Chamberlain FNP is very reasonable compared to the USC program!!!
  6. by   BCgradnurse
    Go to the best program you can afford. Hopefully that will be one that finds preceptors. I know of a few students who were not able to graduate on time because they couldn't find preceptors for clinicals. Keep in mind that you will need several preceptors and clinical sites.
  7. by   aprnKate
    If you ask me, you should pick a school that is accredited. Affordability is also an issue. Depends on how much loans you want to pay. Also, I don't think you would get paid any higher if you went to a super expensive school either that all depends on how you negotiate when you get your first job.
  8. by   newbieniks
    Hello! I went to an online school and had to deal with finding my own preceptors. It was tough getting a job but I don't know if it was because of the school or just because I was a new grad. If given the choice, I would go to a more established school. I'm thinking of going back for a DNP and looking at well respected schools. I wish you well on this new journey!
  9. by   GoodNP
    Quote from newbieniks
    Hello! I went to an online school and had to deal with finding my own preceptors. It was tough getting a job but I don't know if it was because of the school or just because I was a new grad. If given the choice, I would go to a more established school. I'm thinking of going back for a DNP and looking at well respected schools. I wish you well on this new journey!
    This!

    The value of school-provided and vetted preceptors can not be overestimated. I can't tell you how many requests I have received from would-be NP students from no-name online schools 10 states away...and these students don't know me. I had requests even in my first year of practice. They know nothing about me. I have been told "I have to find somebody by next week, I'm desperate!" They are just crossing their fingers and hoping for any NP to take them, with no prior knowledge of the NP's experience, proficiency, ability to teach, etc.

    Additionally, many employers do discriminate based on the school name recognition.

    You are asking for advice, and mine is go to USC.
  10. by   Dranger
    Quote from anne_marie_oregon
    Hello! I am getting ready to start an FNP program with Chamberlain University. I am just wondering - will it make a big difference if I go to a brand name school?

    I have also been in conversations with USC - which is a truly AWESOME brand name.

    The cool thing about USC is that they also take care of ALL clinical preceptors - which, from what I can tell, can be a MAJOR issue in NP school.

    I guess I am just a bit worried about reputation.

    If I go to Chamberlain - will I be less hire-able, coming out of FNP school? My goal is to be an ER-FNP, Urgent Care, or Hospice.

    Does Chamberlain have a reputation as being a second-rate school???

    Thanks for any advice!
    You are telling me USC will provide preceptors no matter where you live? Sorry I really don't believe that, as it isn't really logistically possible. Make sure it just isn't around the SoCal area....

    From their website "Our clinical placement team will work with you to secure placement sites near your community." This is a vague promise many online schools have. My first NP school said the same thing.

    This does not sound like a guarantee....
  11. by   BostonFNP
    In terms of your investment, absolutely it matters where you go to school. Go to the best quality program you can get into.

    Employment is important in the end, but in terms of your investment, the quality of the education is far more important over the course of your career.
    Last edit by BostonFNP on Nov 17
  12. by   traumaRUs
    I think too it depends on the market where you are looking for a job. In over-saturated markets new grads might have a hard time finding a job no matter what school they graduate from .
  13. by   boywithacoin
    For what it's worth, when I requested info about the NP program at USC, I received an email back that they are not yet approved to admit Oregon residents. I assume, due in part, to the fact that practitioners in Oregon can operate independently while in Cali NPs have to have a physician supervisor (such is my understanding? I dunno, I went to undergrad in CA, but am from/work in OR). This was back in June, so maybe things have changed in 5 months.
  14. by   RiaC
    I think the best school to go to is the right school for you and that includes considering factors such as cost, program curriculum, preceptors and clinical placement, location, etc. While some employers and some positions may favor graduates from renowned institutions, at the end of the day, it is the same license and letters at the end of your name. Go where it suits your needs and interests.

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