Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 53

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   SamHill
    This is just my personal opinion...If you take its personally, its on you. But to me one of the advantages of the NP role is that you have the nurse experience to guide you when diagnosing and treating a patient. Without it, its kinda like calling yourself a race car driver just because you got some speeding tickets.
    Last edit by SamHill on Jul 7, '13 : Reason: clarification
  2. by   myelin
    oh, good, this thread is back.
  3. by   BCgradnurse
    Quote from myelin
    oh, good, this thread is back.
    Yeah, guess this dead horse hasn't been beaten enough....
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from priorities2
    No comments on this thread since '11... any updates on people's thoughts on becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience? I'm thinking about taking the plunge and applying during my senior year of BSN to PMHNP programs. I would probably choose to spend more and try to attend a longer program (like OHSU or U of Washington) rather than an accelerated one like Vanderbilt.
    My thoughts haven't changed. I still think it's a bad idea. But why not start a new thread rather than resurrecting this old one?
  5. by   priorities2
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    My thoughts haven't changed. I still think it's a bad idea. But why not start a new thread rather than resurrecting this old one?
    Hm. I guess I've heard on other forums that bringing old threads back can be helpful in terms of consolidating information in one place. Is there a downside to bringing an old thread back rather than starting a new thread?

    It's easy enough to ignore the thread if you're not interested in the topic.
  6. by   NucRN
    I am a relatively new grad (01/12). I only had 6 months of med/onc experience and have been doing Anticoag management since then. I am currently in an acute care DNP program and just finished my first term.

    Patho/health assessment course were taken with all of the different NP programs. For what little experience I have, I was able to hang with the other students that had 10+ years of experience. I even passed my assessment final with 29.4/30. I was one of few students that didn't even use a "cheat sheet".

    So I think it can work even if you don't have experience.
  7. by   1TraumaNurse
    I'm not here to put negativity, but I do just have to say.... there is no short cut to being a good nurse/NP. Bottom line you have to do the time to get into practice and do it the safest and best way. Everyone is always looking for the fastest way to shortcut their way in! You have to do what the rest of us did and put the time in. I have been an RN with my BSN for 15 years and decided to start school for my NP because it took me time to become confident in my clinical skills and learn how every area of nursing works, not that you have to wait that long, that is just how long I chose to wait. Everyone is different. I think its great you want to further your education and change your path and chose nursing, but please don't think you can just fast track your way in, the truth is, it takes time and you need to gain the clinical skill needed to be a good practitioner. People are sue happy and you have to be careful and cautious. Not to mention, do you want your family to see an NP who had no experience? Best wishes....
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from NucRN
    I am a relatively new grad (01/12). I only had 6 months of med/onc experience and have been doing Anticoag management since then. I am currently in an acute care DNP program and just finished my first term.

    Patho/health assessment course were taken with all of the different NP programs. For what little experience I have, I was able to hang with the other students that had 10+ years of experience. I even passed my assessment final with 29.4/30. I was one of few students that didn't even use a "cheat sheet".

    So I think it can work even if you don't have experience.
    "Working even if you don't have experience" while you're in school is one thing. Being an effective NP without bedside experience is quite another.
  9. by   GM2RN
    Quote from NucRN
    I am a relatively new grad (01/12). I only had 6 months of med/onc experience and have been doing Anticoag management since then. I am currently in an acute care DNP program and just finished my first term.

    Patho/health assessment course were taken with all of the different NP programs. For what little experience I have, I was able to hang with the other students that had 10+ years of experience. I even passed my assessment final with 29.4/30. I was one of few students that didn't even use a "cheat sheet".

    So I think it can work even if you don't have experience.
    This proves that you are good test taker. I would not feel comfortable with a new grad nurse taking care of a critically ill family member regardless of her GPA, nor would I feel comfortable with a new grad NP without nursing experience.
  10. by   NucRN
    I don't think I am a good test taker. Wish I was a good test taker. It just means I was able to learn how to do a thorough head to toe physical assessment and do it in a way that allowed me to get an OK grade.

    I'm not sure how it is with other NP programs, but at our university, students work one on one with their preceptor for almost two years( 3 if you are in a DNP program) They are able to make decisions with an NP behind them. I think this is a great way to learn.
  11. by   GM2RN
    Quote from NucRN
    I don't think I am a good test taker. Wish I was a good test taker. It just means I was able to learn how to do a thorough head to toe physical assessment and do it in a way that allowed me to get an OK grade.

    I'm not sure how it is with other NP programs, but at our university, students work one on one with their preceptor for almost two years( 3 if you are in a DNP program) They are able to make decisions with an NP behind them. I think this is a great way to learn.

    Agreed, it is a good way to learn, but it doesn't replace the experience that comes with bedside nursing. You don't have to answer but something to think about: All else being equal, do you think an employer is more likely to hire a new NP with practically no acute care nursing experience or one with several years of acute care experience when competing for a position?
  12. by   zmansc
    Quote from GM2RN
    This proves that you are good test taker. I would not feel comfortable with a new grad nurse taking care of a critically ill family member regardless of her GPA, nor would I feel comfortable with a new grad NP without nursing experience.
    Than I guess you wouldn't feel comfortable with NPs who went through direct entry programs either, as they are designed to take a non-nurse college graduate through RN and NP training. Some do require some number of hours of RN work during the program, others do not.

    The fact is there are many NPs who do not have extensive RN experience who end up as good of NPs as those with many years of RN experience. I have seen no evidence that proves otherwise.

    I have seen students with many years of experience struggle and not make it, and I have seen them do very well. I have also seen both extremes from students with little to no experience. It really depends more on what you do with your time, how well you study the concepts and the underlying principles, and how good you are at applying what experience and knowledge you do have than some number of years.
  13. by   Jules A
    Quote from zmansc
    Than I guess you wouldn't feel comfortable with NPs who went through direct entry programs either, as they are designed to take a non-nurse college graduate through RN and NP training. Some do require some number of hours of RN work during the program, others do not.

    The fact is there are many NPs who do not have extensive RN experience who end up as good of NPs as those with many years of RN experience. I have seen no evidence that proves otherwise.

    I have seen students with many years of experience struggle and not make it, and I have seen them do very well. I have also seen both extremes from students with little to no experience. It really depends more on what you do with your time, how well you study the concepts and the underlying principles, and how good you are at applying what experience and knowledge you do have than some number of years.
    I am not a fan of any direct masters program, especially the Clinical Nurse Leader track. Bottom line is there are good and bad NPs, just like MDs, and while I can't offer statistics anecdotally the NPs I have encountered who are extra sharp ALL have significant experience as nurses in their field. The few I have encountered who are horrible do not. I believe there is a great value in spending time spending time assessing patients, administering medications and seeing the effects first hand while under the safety net of someone else actually prescribing those medications.

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