Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 44

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   Ellen NP
    Maybe this has to do with the state requirements or local preferences. I know a number of direct entry NP's who were hired as NP's as soon as threy graduated. I'm not recommending this, but they were legally able tp practice once they passed their NP boards. I still belive that NP students should have experience as RN's before acceptance into NP programs. The NP education assumes knowledge acquired in practice. If someone has no clinical experience prior to NP education, the NP clinical hours are really not adequate....my opinion, of course.
  2. by   magnolia nurse
    Quote from iHealth
    I know we are speaking a LOT about NPs being hired..but what about RN (ADN), for example, who went to an ADN-MSN program and ONLY have a goal of opening their own practice, afterward?

    I'm interested in entering an ADN-MSN program. I have the ability to take off 4-5 years, without having to work at ALL, and when I graduate, I ONLY want to open my own clinic. However, I was under the impression that, in order to do so, I would need to work as an RN a few years...or is that entirely true? I live in NY and would open my clinic here, Arizona, or Nevada. :-)
    I think the question is not when you open up a clinic, the question is when will you feel confident to take care of patients and know you have the critical thinking skills to make the decisions needed to provide excellent care.. when you work as an RN you learn how to take care of patients and develop critical thinking skills, as a NP you will be working as a provider and will have a different mindset ( i would hope) the RN expereince will enhance your skills.
    The Medical model is not the same as the nursing model., nurses are taught to take care of the whole patient, and not look at just a body part or system,...but as one post stated residents come out and have never been doctors, and I know you know all MD's are not in favor of NP's anyway and any enhancement you can have to make you a better provider I am say go for it.. nurses don't need to get physicans another reason to bash NP's for not meeting the educational standard to provide good patient care..
    Last edit by magnolia nurse on Sep 26, '10 : Reason: left a work out
  3. by   MBARN
    I graduated from the same accelerated program and in my humble opinion there is a great range of nurses with varying abilities. I do think experience is necessary b/c of the querkey things you learn as a nurse that are necessary to know that isn't taught in school. Also, something to consider, will employers hire you when they have to choose you or one of your classmates with several years of nursing experience? That can be a problem. It is all about marketability and competence!
  4. by   mtstringer
    Quote from Blurr156
    One program near me (Columbia University) has what they call an ETP (Entry to Practice) combined BS/MS program. The first year is full time to satisfy the BSN portion. The rest of the program is for the MS(NP) which may be done part time or full time. I was thinking of maybe going through this program and after finishing the BS part (hopefully) then working as an RN and continuing part-time with the rest. Lots to think about, but I'm eager to move on from where I have been for a long time. Thanks again.
    Hi Blurr,

    I saw that you posted this a few years ago. I've been looking into that exact program and event went to an info session at Columbia when I was in NYC last. Sounds like a solid program. Just wondering if you ended up going and what you thought?

    Thanks!

    Matt
  5. by   dberjac
    I know that there are many who say that you have to be a nurse first. I totally disagree. I went through an immersion program. There are 35 Family NPs that graduated from our program. Not one of us has been turned away from a well paying job due to lack of nursing experience. The job that you will do does in fact differ from being a registered nurse on the floor. I do not mean this in a bad way at all. You are being paid to evaluate and DIAGNOSE a particular problem. What is important is that you understand nursing philosophy and principles which you will get in your education.
  6. by   BCgradnurse
    Quote from dberjac
    I know that there are many who say that you have to be a nurse first. I totally disagree. I went through an immersion program. There are 35 Family NPs that graduated from our program. Not one of us has been turned away from a well paying job due to lack of nursing experience. The job that you will do does in fact differ from being a registered nurse on the floor. I do not mean this in a bad way at all. You are being paid to evaluate and DIAGNOSE a particular problem. What is important is that you understand nursing philosophy and principles which you will get in your education.

    I'm right there with ya!! I graduated from a Master's Entry program with no RN experience. All of my class found jobs very quickly and we're doing just fine as NPs. I think RN experience is definitely valuable, particularly in an acute care setting, but not imperative.
  7. by   Grnrn
    Hi,

    from reading the postings here and it looks like the RN experienceto be hired as an NP is not essential.

    I have worked as and RN for 7 years in acute care, then took about 7 yrs. off to raise family. Now, I am back in the hospital setting (critical care). I have one more year left to graduate as an Adult NP. I was under impression that the more critical care experience you get the better it is to be hired as an NP, hence my working in critical care setting. My work situation is VERY stressful to say the least: I am learning the hard way that critical care is not my cup of tea.

    Messages on this board make me question whether all that I am going through right now (combining a stressful job and demanding school curriculum) is worth doing to have better hiring prospects as an NP..... Fortunately, we are financially very stable and I do have opportunity to finish my NP program without having to work. Anyone has any opinions as to whether critical care experience will make a difference?


    (FYI: I am planning to work in primary care as an NP)

    Thank you!

    GrnRN
    Last edit by Grnrn on Oct 26, '10 : Reason: grammar
  8. by   Ellen NP
    If you are hoping to work as an NP in a critical care setting(and apparently you are NOT), the critical care experience is not going to make you more marketable as an NP. If you don't have to work while in school, be kind to yourself and focus on school. Maybe there's an opportunity to spend some additional hours in your clinical placement. More experience in the field in which you hope to work can only add to your skill and comfort in practice.

    If you find that you want to do some work in a less stressful setting you might try community health. The hours are flexible, you get to use physical assessment skills, do a lot of health teaching, etc. You also get a feeling for what people face at home when trying to make lifestyle changes. It can help you to ask important questions of patients when you see them in the office.

    Good luck with your studies. It will be worth all the work when you graduate.
  9. by   JoblessNewGradRN
    Hi everyone,

    I posted a comment on a post and didn't get any comments on why advanced practice nurses (NPs in particular) need to have years of RN experience to be hire-able or gain the respect of fellow medical professionals. I'm a new grad and still looking for my first RN job. In the future, I do plan to become a NP, but my goals right now are to start working and pay off my student loans. I also think that it would benefit me to pursue my master's degree while employed so that I can benefit from the tuition reimbursement most hospitals offer. However, if i find nothing after months of searching, then I may apply for grad school.

    Anyway, I do know some people who graduated with their BSN who went directly to master's programs to get their NP. A lot of nurses seem to look down on this and I don't understand why. Why is that PAs don't get the same criticism as NPs who have little or no RN experience. While I have been looking for jobs, I have seen job postings that state, "PA New Grad or NP with X years of RN experience." I don't get it. It suggests that NP programs are not as strong as PA programs. To me it's like saying a doctor shouldn't be a doctor unless he/she has been a PA first. Same goes for pharmacists... do they need to be a pharmacy tech first to be a good pharmacist? A lot of people go into nursing without a medical background and become successful nurses.

    Please share your insight because if master's programs are producing unhire-able NPs or NPs who don't deserve the respect of other health professionals simply because they haven't done their time as an RN, then maybe we should just do away with these programs.
  10. by   Up2nogood RN
    IMO advance practice nurses are experts in their field. How can you be an expert with no experience whatsoever?
  11. by   JoblessNewGradRN
    Quote from TittytatRN
    IMO advance practice nurses are experts in their field. How can you be an expert with no experience whatsoever?
    Do you feel the same way about PAs? Do you ask your pharmacist if they were a tech before they fill your prescription? Does experience necessarily equate to expertise?
  12. by   Up2nogood RN
    Quote from JoblessNewGradRN
    Do you feel the same way about PAs? Do you ask your pharmacist if they were a tech before they fill your prescription? Does experience necessarily equate to expertise?
    I don't see pharmacists in the same way, that they specifically need prior experience as techs. They do have many hours of hands on clinicals in a pharmacy (I know this since I've looked into a PharmD program).
    As for PA's, the only one I know employed in my hospital did have prior experience. Like they should have, but this is just my opinion, take it as you will.

    ETA: and my FNP did work on the floor as an RN (I asked) and thats why I still go to her.
  13. by   ebear
    PAs have hrs and hrs of practical clinical experience. Although nursing schools give you the basics to begin your career, you don't really understand how to put it all together until you've worked for a couple of yrs as an RN. Experience is the BEST teacher and there are just some things you can't learn from a book. When you get your first nursing job, you'll understand. Trust me on this one. Be patient. One step at a time...

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