Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 43

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   MBARN
    Thank you so much!
  2. by   t2krookie
    Quote from sugah britches
    is a vast difference in studying about the presentation of a dissecting aortic aneurysm and "knowing" one when a patient presents with "feeling kind of weak and a sharp pain between my shoulder blades, but i have been working in the yard and may have a pulled muscle"

    just mho!
    hmm, of the "three" i have seen in over a decade, the presentation was always the same. some ems guy sitting on his chest pumping away to no avail as they roll them into the room. i had not been so lucky to see/assess one with a chance in hades and still awake.
  3. by   Sugah Britches
    Quote from t2krookie
    Hmm, of the "three" I have seen in over a decade, the presentation was always the same. Some EMS guy sitting on his chest pumping away to no avail as they roll them into the room. I had not been so lucky to see/assess one with a chance in hades and still awake.

    Last month, 63 yo male.. presented with those complaints.. granted it was a 3.5 cm "leaking" aneurysm....

    But true.. most don't have a chance in hades as you put it... trying to make a point...
  4. by   t2krookie
    Quote from Sugah Britches
    Last month, 63 yo male.. presented with those complaints.. granted it was a 3.5 cm "leaking" aneurysm....

    But true.. most don't have a chance in hades as you put it... trying to make a point...
    Hehe,

    Often those complaints are worked up as a simple cardiac vs musc/skel screen. There was an angel sitting on his shoulder no doubt. Good catch.
  5. by   Ellen NP
    Graduates of direct entry MSN/NP programs do not have to take entry level RN positions. I know graduates who have quickly found NP positions. In my experience, those who are most successful are those with previous healthcare experience(Paramedicine, military medics, etc). I suspect that the job market for an NP without RN experience will depend on the area in which the individual is searching.

    It is my own opinion that NP programs should admit only experienced healthcare professionals.
  6. by   Sugah Britches
    Quote from t2krookie
    Hehe,

    Often those complaints are worked up as a simple cardiac vs musc/skel screen. There was an angel sitting on his shoulder no doubt. Good catch.

    I would love to take credit but.... I was working in the ED at the time and good ole Doc W gets the credit.. but to pat myself on the back, had already ordered the CT before ole Doc laid eyes on the man... .
  7. by   iHealth
    I know we are speaking a LOT about NPs being hired..but what about RN (ADN), for example, who went to an ADN-MSN program and ONLY have a goal of opening their own practice, afterward?

    I'm interested in entering an ADN-MSN program. I have the ability to take off 4-5 years, without having to work at ALL, and when I graduate, I ONLY want to open my own clinic. However, I was under the impression that, in order to do so, I would need to work as an RN a few years...or is that entirely true? I live in NY and would open my clinic here, Arizona, or Nevada. :-)
  8. by   tryingtohaveitall
    Honestly, I can't imagine being ready for the responsibility. I have been a peds critical care RN for 21 years now and still don't feel ready.
  9. by   orangepink
    Quote from Blurr156
    TI am a little surprised that people who graduate from NP programs (and hadn't worked as RN's) would have to take an RN position first and work for some time before being able to get an NP position. Why have these programs in the first place? It is misleading thinking that one can finish this program and start working as an NP. If my friend hadn't put that question in my head (and with the feedback here) I think I would have been in for a real shock after having worked so hard for those years only to find out I would be starting in an RN position.
    I'm glad you pointed this out because an NP with little or no experience has the same playing field as a resident who just passed their boards. There's not much difference there. Both underwent training, academically and clinically.
  10. by   Spacklehead
    Quote from orangepink
    I'm glad you pointed this out because an NP with little or no experience has the same playing field as a resident who just passed their boards. There's not much difference there. Both underwent training, academically and clinically.
    Except a resident is still technically supervised by and has to answer to an attending for at least a few more years; where new NPs are typically on their own as soon as they start working. It can be ok if their collaborating physician is on-site at all times; but can get scary if they are left alone to fend for themselves in a busy rural clinic, for example. This is where the prior years of nursing experience at the bedside helps tremendously.
  11. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from Spacklehead
    Except a resident is still technically supervised by and has to answer to an attending for at least a few more years; where new NPs are typically on their own as soon as they start working. It can be ok if their collaborating physician is on-site at all times; but can get scary if they are left alone to fend for themselves in a busy rural clinic, for example. This is where the prior years of nursing experience at the bedside helps tremendously.
    No matter how many years of nursing experience one has, NPs need several years of NURSE PRACTITIONER experience before going out on their own. I made sure I had 5 full years of experience with most of that time spent working side by side with physicians (who knew what they were doing) before I even considered opening my clinic. You never know what's going to walk through that door.
  12. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from iHealth
    I know we are speaking a LOT about NPs being hired..but what about RN (ADN), for example, who went to an ADN-MSN program and ONLY have a goal of opening their own practice, afterward?

    I'm interested in entering an ADN-MSN program. I have the ability to take off 4-5 years, without having to work at ALL, and when I graduate, I ONLY want to open my own clinic. However, I was under the impression that, in order to do so, I would need to work as an RN a few years...or is that entirely true? I live in NY and would open my clinic here, Arizona, or Nevada. :-)

    Honestly, you need to work as a nurse practitioner for several years before even contemplating going out on your own. Get a job with a busy internist who specializes in complicated patients, so you will be exposed to a wide range of diseases/illnesses/injuries. I can't emphasize enough how important this type of experience is, because you never know what you will see out there on your own.
  13. by   yelnikmcwawa
    i am a nursing student finishing up my accelerated bsn program for 2nd degree students. i plan on applying to pnp programs right out of graduation, but since i have a work commitment with the hrsa scholarship, i will have to work and go to school part time. so when i graduate with my pnp, i will have rn experience. but that is beside the point...

    what i have noticed in my short time in nursing school is that there are some very good and knowledgeable rns, and there are some very bad and quite frankly, dumb rns out there. i precepted one day with an endoscopy nurse and one of the patients was found to have a hiatal hernia. i was pretty sure i knew what one was but i asked this nurse for clarification. she told me i was wrong and continued to give me some other explanation for what it was. turns out later on, she was totally wrong and my previous assumption was correct. what was even more appalling was the fact that this woman had been and endoscopy nurse for 8 years. 8 years and she had no clue what a hiatal hernia was!!! i am in school with some brilliant students who quite possibly have better diagnosing and treating capabilities than some of the rns i've come across so far.

    bottom line, i get what many of you all are saying about how valuable rn experience can be for an np. and i don't doubt that in the least. but i would imagine that many students who have the ability to get accepted to an np program fresh out of their bsn, and then succeed in finishing it have adequate enough skills to be a good np.

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