Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 15

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    coreO - I was in the same boat in the ER! I moved from the ER at the age of 47 and I still love the ER! However, I couldn't see myself at that pace in my 60's! lol
  2. by   mom and nurse
    :spin:
    Quote from traumaRUs
    coreO - I agree that even as a new grad CNS, it was continually brought up that the physicians and other mid-levels liked the idea that I had done more than nursing.
    The above is good to know and has been true for me. I became an RN when I was 45 and I've almost completed 3 years as an RN at the bedside...(acute rehab...others think med/surg light.... though it is not "light" most days....) I'm halfway through a part-time ANP program and I am just beginning my clinicals. I've found that even as an RN, all that "life experience" is counting for something as I head toward my 50s. I went to school originally as a teen, received a BA in Communications disorders (Speech and Hearing), never worked as a Speech Pathologist (since a Masters was needed), learned sign language, volunteered with deaf kids as a teacher's assistant, and interpreted for deaf adults at my church, worked for a law firm doing data entry, worked at the State Department in D.C. as a clerk typist and doing administrative assistant work (before the internet, and e-mail...we used "white out" to make corrections and typed on IBM Selectric Typewriters) Married, raised 5 kids (3 biological, two adopted as older kids, 6 and 7, who both turned out to be bipolar....now all are adults, except my youngest who is 16) and as a mom and wife was cook, chauffeur, PTA mom, etc, etc. I told someone today I remember working from home doing data entry for the law firm, typing at 2am in the morning as I rocked my son to sleep in his rocker seat, by using the heel of my foot on the rocker seat's edge as I typed (he turned out fine and is a freshman in college....loves the sound of computer keys though.... I originally made the decision to go to graduate school after having 6, 7, etc patients at a time and missing lunch, etc due to the fast pace. One day, after checking a pulsox at work by placing it on myself and discovering my heart rate was 145, I realized I may not be able to keep up this pace forever.... I thought my age would be a hindrance and a disadvantage to becoming a nurse, but it appears to be working to my advantage that I'm in my middle age years....... I'm hoping and praying that I can survive at this fast pace as a bedside nurse and graduate from the ANP program in Dec 2007. And I'm hoping that this advantage as an "older nurse" with past experience continues as I strive to become an NP.....
    Last edit by mom and nurse on Jan 18, '07
  3. by   traumaRUs
    mom and nurse - I think you will have a distinct advantage. I became a nurse at 32, am a military wife, lived in Japan, Spain, Korea, Alaska, Las Vegas, etc. and have seen a lot. I've worked as a med transcriptionist, worked full time nights as an LPN while going to school full-time days for my RN and oh did I say that I also was wife and mother.

    That bit of experience forced me to become very organized and that has held me well as a nurse.
  4. by   mom and nurse
    Quote from traumaRUs
    mom and nurse - I think you will have a distinct advantage. I became a nurse at 32, am a military wife, lived in Japan, Spain, Korea, Alaska, Las Vegas, etc. and have seen a lot. I've worked as a med transcriptionist, worked full time nights as an LPN while going to school full-time days for my RN and oh did I say that I also was wife and mother.

    That bit of experience forced me to become very organized and that has held me well as a nurse.
    TraumaRUS - I'm sure being a military wife made you very organized My mom was a military wife and she raised I and my siblings as we were sent to the Philippines, California, Virginia, Texas, the state of Washington, Washington D.C., with pit stops in Oklahoma where most of her family lived. . I appreciate more of what she went through after I became a mom and stayed basically in the same area as my kids grew up. I dreaded the experience as a child...8 elementary schools, a couple of junior highs..... But I cherish the memories now as an adult, ...especially since most of our travelling was done by car and we saw the U.S.... Wow. You worked full time nights as an LPN while going to school full time days for your RN...and you were a wife and mom too. And I thought I had it rough when I was an undergrad in nursing school and a stay at home mom with 5 teens at home...... I send claps your way.... And I'll see my clinicals as an NP student as another adventure...I've had many....Guess this is just another one. Yep...guess life experience does count....
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Mom and Nurse - what a great attitude. You will certainly be an asset to whatever facility is lucky enough to hire you. Good luck.
  6. by   Psychaprn
    You cannot teach experience! Most of skills I learned and needed to become an NP were gleaned from years of experience as a nurse-the education as an NP and the certification, etc. were icing on the cake. I sure wouldn't want a direct entry MD-to imply that people with non nursing education and experience could be of the same caliber as a seasoned nurse and educated Np is an insult to all NP'S.
  7. by   mom and nurse
    Quote from Psychaprn
    You cannot teach experience! Most of skills I learned and needed to become an NP were gleaned from years of experience as a nurse-the education as an NP and the certification, etc. were icing on the cake. I sure wouldn't want a direct entry MD-to imply that people with non nursing education and experience could be of the same caliber as a seasoned nurse and educated Np is an insult to all NP'S.

    I agree. Of all the experiences I've had, yes my experience as a nurse would have to be the most valuable in order to practice as an NP.....
  8. by   np_wannabe
    Quote from Psychaprn
    I sure wouldn't want a direct entry MD-to imply that people with non nursing education and experience could be of the same caliber as a seasoned nurse and educated Np is an insult to all NP'S.

    I will not be applying to a direct entry program, but would if one were offered in my area...

    I agree that direct entry NP's are probably less knowledgable than experienced nurses who move on to NP, but I have to say...aren't MOST MDs direct entry? Everyone I know that went on to medical school did so immediately following their college graduation. If that's not direct entry, I don't know what is.
  9. by   core0
    Quote from Psychaprn
    You cannot teach experience! Most of skills I learned and needed to become an NP were gleaned from years of experience as a nurse-the education as an NP and the certification, etc. were icing on the cake. I sure wouldn't want a direct entry MD-to imply that people with non nursing education and experience could be of the same caliber as a seasoned nurse and educated Np is an insult to all NP'S.
    I am not sure I understand you here. What do you mean by a direct entry MD? Are you referring to someone who hasn't finished internship?

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  10. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from core0
    I am not sure I understand you here. What do you mean by a direct entry MD? Are you referring to someone who hasn't finished internship?

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    Can I jump in here? The previous posts means that med students and direct NP students aren't that different. IE, direct entry NP programs do not *require* previous healthcare experience. Neither does medical school. So, in a way, med students are similar to direct-entry NP students. Neither requires experience.

    Yes, I realize that med students are required to do a rather long internship, and nurses are not technically required to do that.
  11. by   core0
    Quote from mvanz9999
    Can I jump in here? The previous posts means that med students and direct NP students aren't that different. IE, direct entry NP programs do not *require* previous healthcare experience. Neither does medical school. So, in a way, med students are similar to direct-entry NP students. Neither requires experience.

    Yes, I realize that med students are required to do a rather long internship, and nurses are not technically required to do that.
    Umm if you are equating four years of med school and a minimum of three years of residency with NP programs you really should examine this.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  12. by   mvanz9999
    LOL! No, that's not what I mean.

    Nurses are trained as nurses and doctors are trained as doctors. It's apples and oranges.

    I think the point of the post that I was making is that med school students are not required to have medical experience in order to attend medical schools, nor are they required to have any health care experience to become physicians after their training.

    The poster is simply saying WHY are Nurse Practitioners allegedly required to have nursing experience before becoming mid-level nursing providers? Doctors don't need pre-training experience, so why do nurses insist that nurse practitioners must have pre-training experience?
  13. by   Tinker08
    Im a little confused...after i finish my BSN, and go 2 more years for my masters...do i have to again go to school for NP??

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