Are online ANP degrees destroying our credibility? - page 19

I was talking to a private practice doctor about an opening in his practice. Currently, I am employed by the hospital. He told me that they will only consider PA's due to having more of a hard... Read More

  1. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    Quote from VICEDRN
    I guess you have decided that insulting me is going to change my mind. Let me know when you even look at what the mds have done to midwifery in this country.I think my statements about my intentions are very plain. Shortly, I will move and attend a top ranked on ground graduate program. You ask by who? Well, who ranked yours? Probably us news and world report.As for why, I want to salvage something out of the absolutely idiotic choice I made to go into nursing. If the market changes, I will do something else.The only people that I think have a viable future are the crnas.
    Viced, are you speaking of regular midwives/ Licensed Midwives (LM, CM) or nursing midwives? Because in the case of the first, I can see a trend similar to what you speak, but not in the cast of Certified Nurse Midwives (CNM).
  2. Visit  SycamoreGuy profile page
    0
    Quote from SycamoreStudent
    I still remember a little of my "statistics for health care professionals" class. I must have either missed or forgot the part where one persons anecdotal observation, in one part of the country is sufficient to generalize a whole population. Maybe I should pull the old book out and review
    Come to think of it I took that class online, that must be why I never learned that.
  3. Visit  TraceyMarino profile page
    1
    Just a few comments. I have been caring for patients in some capacity since 1987. I have seen many changes, including DRG's, the introduction of PA's to mainstream hospital medicine, the rise and fall of the imported nurse from forgeign countries to solve the shortage, you get the point.

    I think PA's and NPS are both here to stay. Yes, they present a threat to the medical establishment because any time you take money out of a doctor's mouth they get ******.

    VicedRN, I remember when CRNA's were "taking over" in the late 80's and early 90's. Made the rich MD anesths at University of Michigan mad. They forced the closure of the U of M Ann Arbor CRNA program. Only program left, inner city Flint. Great place to do clinicals.

    There are good PA's, bad. Good NP's, bad. Good docs and bad. I will take someone with experience, compassion, and interest in my well being any day. You have these things, I don't care where you went to school.

    I am curious that you are chosing to go into NP, when you are certain of their demise. If you think CRNA's are the only APRNS here to stay, go to CRNA school. Last time I checked, you needed nearly a 4.0 to get in, it is now a DNP program, and you need about a hundred grand in your pocket to finish--cannot work during the program. However, I have a good friend who teaches in the CRNA program for Oakland university, and their grads are having a hard time finding jobs. That market is getting very tight.

    Just my two cents!
    VICEDRN likes this.
  4. Visit  VICEDRN profile page
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    Pun-leaze! The acceptance letter addressed to the hubby from a crna program is sitting on our desk. It says, "if you don't a have a year of experience after orientation by the date of program start..." He has three years but this program is happy to take someone with less than one year. According to this program, 100% of their grads have jobs at graduation.I believe nps are in decline but I have other skills and will move on as needed and am hopeful the decline (along with the decline of the rn) will take longer than what is left of my working life span.if nothing else, I can use the msn to teach Bsn clinicals. (At least around here that works) I refer to the certified nurse midwives who have seen their influence, numbers of schools and their skill sets limited by threatened mds. They were ready for us and learned from the crna thing. They will not let us get a foothold again.
    Added: gpas at the Grad programs are not as competitive as they want you to think. As long you are above 3.3, they really don't care.
    Last edit by VICEDRN on Jan 27, '13
  5. Visit  VICEDRN profile page
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    Ps. Every one keeps saying well there are good and bad in all professions but if I sit here and count...I count like two bad pas and like 95% of the nps I know. Emory and vandy are both close and considered top ranked programs.
  6. Visit  IrishIzRN profile page
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    Quote from VICEDRN
    Ps. Every one keeps saying well there are good and bad in all professions but if I sit here and count...I count like two bad pas and like 95% of the nps I know. Emory and vandy are both close and considered top ranked programs.
    And I can count 1 good pa and countless good nps...meaningless.
  7. Visit  VICEDRN profile page
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    Quote from IrishIzRN
    And I can count 1 good pa and countless good nps...meaningless.
    Not so meaningless when you come on here and see how many talking about how this and that office only wants pas, not nps. Not so meaningless when choosing your own educational pathway either. As stated, I would rather pa than np but that's not an option where we are going. The pa program is standardized, has more clinical hours at the provider level and is more flexible then np programs. We can round and round but you won't change my mind. I come from a family of business people and stock brokers and have been calling market trends since I was wee (successfully and much to the delight of my family). I have no doubt about what I see locally and what I suspect nationally.
  8. Visit  SycamoreGuy profile page
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    As enjoyable as reading everyone's anecdotal evidence is I think it is important to point out that in every study (that I am aware of anyway) comparing NPs and Physicians there is no significant difference in quality of care or patient outcomes, between the two. In other words, any difference between NPs and Physicians is perception and not fact, regardless of what method the provider used for their education.
  9. Visit  VICEDRN profile page
    0
    Quote from SycamoreStudent
    As enjoyable as reading everyone's anecdotal evidence is I think it is important to point out that in every study (that I am aware of anyway) comparing NPs and Physicians there is no significant difference in quality of care or patient outcomes, between the two. In other words, any difference between NPs and Physicians is perception and not fact, regardless of what method the provider used for their education.
    Actually not true. Death rates for deliveries:

    .37 per 1000 md
    .64 per 1000 cnm
    1.31 per 1000 midwife, non nurse

    And that's just to start...
  10. Visit  IrishIzRN profile page
    1
    Quote from VICEDRN

    Actually not true. Death rates for deliveries:

    .37 per 1000 md
    .64 per 1000 cnm
    1.31 per 1000 midwife, non nurse

    And that's just to start...
    Can you please provide references for your "data"?
    SycamoreGuy likes this.
  11. Visit  SycamoreGuy profile page
    1
    Quote from VICEDRN
    Actually not true. Death rates for deliveries:

    .37 per 1000 md
    .64 per 1000 cnm
    1.31 per 1000 midwife, non nurse

    And that's just to start...
    I thought this thread was about NPs? Yes, I too would be interested in your sources.
    myelin likes this.
  12. Visit  zenman profile page
    3
    Quote from VICEDRN
    Actually not true. Death rates for deliveries:

    .37 per 1000 md
    .64 per 1000 cnm
    1.31 per 1000 midwife, non nurse

    And that's just to start...
    Any differences in the population? The MD may have a lower risk population while the midwifes may be delivering high risk population with little to no prenatal care. My exwife was a CNM and I remember at one time Louisiana had one of the highest rates of infant deaths. The CNMs helped with that until the physicians drove them away and the rates returned.
    SHGR, SycamoreGuy, and sirI like this.
  13. Visit  Leah236 profile page
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    I have not read through each response, but one thing that I don't see mentioned here is the fact that even "brick and mortar" NP programs are transitioning their courses to online format! We also must differentiate between "online diploma mills" and "distance accessible MSN programs" from accredited universities. I am in my second semester of a distance accessible NP program. My didactic courses are delivered online, I must travel to campus for onsite skills evaluations, and I must complete clinical preceptorships with NPs and facilities approved by my program. Depending on the type of learner you are, this option may not be ideal, but the point is... now a days with webcam lectures etc., it is not much different than the "on-campus" programs (who deliver much of the program online anyway).

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