Advice - Is this for me?

  1. 0
    ever since i started my bsn i have really considered keeping it going to obtain my msn - fnp. here's the thing, over the years i haven't come across many happy np's. many i have spoken/shadowed seemed disgruntled with their choice. i don't want to end up that way! now that i am finished with my bsn (yay, me!), i really need help to decide if i am seeing this thru rose colored glasses or if maybe those i have had contact with expected something it isn't.
    these are my honest reasons for getting my anp certification:

    • i enjoy preventive and a holistic approach to healthcare.
    • i really want to be a big part of patient teaching and spend time with my patients.
    • i am hoping for a specialty to concentrate in, but am okay with primary care once i feel comfortable with it.
    • i am in my early 30ís, getting married, and want to have a family. i would like to work part-time while our kids are young, and still make enough money to contribute to the house hold.
    its now or never for me. people keep questioning why i would want to do this, and can't i just get a job doing those things without my masters. okay, so tell me, iím crazy??

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  2. 3 Comments...

  3. 0
    Sorry, typo - *am I crazy? *
  4. 0
    Quote from lostnneuro


    • i enjoy preventive and a holistic approach to healthcare.
    • i really want to be a big part of patient teaching and spend time with my patients.
    • i am hoping for a specialty to concentrate in, but am okay with primary care once i feel comfortable with it.
    • i am in my early 30’s, getting married, and want to have a family. i would like to work part-time while our kids are young, and still make enough money to contribute to the house hold.
    if it is what you want to do, then just do it. however, from what you posted it doesn't sound like it really fits what you're looking for. there are rn jobs that focus on prevention and all rns take a holistic approach to their patients. of course it varies by practice, but i don't know that you will have a lot of time for pt teaching and spending time with your patients. most clinics are busy and you have to have productivity levels that justify your salary. as for the last part, many rns take a pay cut when they become nps. the salaries generally are not that good and have stagnated. nps have a lot more responsibility and a lot more continuing education stuff to keep up on to remain competent. also, nps are generally salaried, so you aren't paid for all of the extra meetings and trainings you have to come in for. specialty clinics often have required call too which takes time away from your family.

    imo, if you want your family to come first and have a part-time job to just help contribute to the family then you are much better off as an rn. you have a lot more options when it comes to jobs and hours, it's easier to find jobs, and you generally don't take work home with you. that's just my take on things.
  5. 0
    Thank u! This is what I need to hear - honest opinions!


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