ACNPC-AG vs. AGACNP-BC

  1. what's the difference between these two credentials? I'm lost.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   juan de la cruz
    Graduates of Adult Gerontology ACNP programs have two options for national board certification examination. These two credentials basically correspond to the specific board exam the NP took and passed. ACNPC-AG is a credential awarded by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. AGACNP-BC is a credential awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center.
  4. by   nursingsprettycool17
    ahh i see, so there's no difference practice wise? like both of these credentials allow the np to do the same things and see the same patients ?
  5. by   juan de la cruz
    National certification from either ANCC or AACN is just one step in being able to practice. Both certification credentials are similar in that they are the first step a new graduate would do to start a practicing. They are also both widely accepted across all 50 states. The next step is usually obtaining state licensure as an NP. Each state has their own practice scope and that really determines what NP's could and could not do.

    In order to get paid for our services, there is also insurance credentialing which in most cases involve getting an NPI number, CMS application, and approval from a number of private insurances. As ACNP's, many of us practice in hospital setting that also require application for hospital privileges.
  6. by   diprifan
    Like Juan said, it's just one step. They both get you to get licensed in your state. Being "allowed" to do a procedure or skill is a part of the credentialing and hospital privileging process. Not sure about every state but mine makes mention of seeing the population that you were educated for... so the adult-gerontology acute care population is what I am educated for.
    There are other posts that mention the differences in the actual exams; but they are generally the same in terms of content.
  7. by   nursingsprettycool17
    Thanks for your help, I notice that you said you're also an ACNP. So I have another question. I've been wondering. Lets say that you get tired of acute care; so since you're an ACNP could you also, like for the heck of it, open up your own primary care clinic under your license? Or are FNPs the only APRNs that are allowed to open up a primary care clinic? if you couldn't do primary care could you then instead decide to open up an emergency room clinic? or an urgent care clinic? or any other type of independent clinical practice? is any of this possible? or are ACNPs forever bound to work as hospital employees?
  8. by   AnonymousACNPCAG
    I'm pro Acnp -ag! Just because I'm a CCU nurse at heart lol. But your scope of practice is the same for both. Also most states say you can't do primary care as an ACNP but you can open an urgent care or work in an internal Med clinic depending on your state. If you want to do "family" med you could go back to school to get the family portion and sit for FNP boards ... or you could do like me and go through a dual role course and sit for both boards (FNP and ACNPC-AG)
  9. by   nursingsprettycool17
    ahhh okay, so fnps open up primary care clinics and acnps open up urgent care clinics? am i understanding you right? what about midwives? do they fall under primary or urgent care? i would assume both, primary during the pregnancy and urgent during labor right? could a midwife open up a labor and delivery clinic? do those even exist lol? what about crnas? can they open up some type of independent practice? or psych nps? can they open up their own detox or rehab centers?
  10. by   AnonymousACNPCAG
    My understanding is that you are referring to opening an outpatient private practice to work there as well. I don't know whether or not midwives can open like private birthing centers or CRNAs opening private practices since I can only speak for my certifications and state requirements. There are many outpatient Psych clinics run by NPs, but not sure of the others. Again this is if you plan to practice there, I'm sure technically you can open any kind of business you want since medicine is essentially a business with providers as employees, but if you plan to practice there of course it would need to be within your scope of practice... hope this helps

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