2015 DNP Requirement for APNs - page 5

Hey everyone, Is it true that all NPs and other APNs will have to finish off their DNP in order to achieve NP status after 2015? I'm currently applying for FNP school and I'm getting worried... Read More

  1. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    0
    So PMFB-RN do I understand you correctly that the DNP program was the same length as the MSN
    *** No, the DNP is a year longer than the MSN program.

    Does this require applicants to already have their MSN (as I've seen some programs do) or is it a BSN-DNP that someone else mentioned?
    *** No, like nearly all DNP programs desinged to train APNs no masters degree is required.

    I'm confused. If the DNP goes straight from a BSN, then what's the difference between it and an MSP
    *** Cost and length. The DNP is dramaticaly more expensive and is a year longer. There are no clinical or clinicaly related classes added beyond what was offered in the MSN program.
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  3. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    0
    Quote from priorities2
    Unfortunate. I would actually be really interested in attending Minnesota's NP program because I'm in the Midwest and get reciprocity tuition with UMN - but their in-state, reciprocity and out of state tuition costs for the DNP are all identical! It strikes me as kind of a rip off.
    *** Their NP & CRNA students do clinicals in one of the hospitals where I work. They are well trained from what I can see.
  4. Visit  scwolf} profile page
    0
    Thanks, PMFB-RN, and others for the information. I feel like a traveler who is arriving at the station after the train pulled out. Instead of 3 years schooling to become an NP, I'm looking at 5-6!

    I do think NP should be well trained. This just seems wrong-headed. For one thing, it seems like it really makes things hard for low-income students or those with families.

    Ah, well. Onward.
  5. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    0
    Quote from scwolf
    Thanks, PMFB-RN, and others for the information. I feel like a traveler who is arriving at the station after the train pulled out. Instead of 3 years schooling to become an NP, I'm looking at 5-6!

    I do think NP should be well trained. This just seems wrong-headed. For one thing, it seems like it really makes things hard for low-income students or those with families.

    Ah, well. Onward.
    Why no attend one of the many masters NP programs?
  6. Visit  scwolf} profile page
    0
    I'm considering a masters NP program but two things:

    1. They seem to be rolling up their rugs one by one. Three schools I was considering have already closed their masters NP programs. (And started DNP programs.)
    2. I'm wondering if, by the time I graduate, I will not be qualified to be an NP (without a doctorate).
    Oh, and it does also seem that, as programs close, the remaining ones are bound to become more competitive.

    I'm not giving up entirely, just feeling a little disheartened at the moment. I keep hoping that the pressure of Obamacare's need for NPs might reverse this trend, in order to get more NPs ready in time to meet the need.
  7. Visit  LiLoRN} profile page
    1
    I don't know if this point has been brought up as I just read the "last" page of this thread, but scwolf, my school no longer has just a MSN program so I am in the DNP program. They give us the option of obtaining the MSN along the way, which I am getting in August and will not be returning to complete the DNP. Point being, even though there are few schools that only offer the MSN you can still get it and stop there. I don't think there will be a doctorate mandate any time soon.
    C-lion likes this.
  8. Visit  OnceMore} profile page
    2
    The NP MSN is going to come back. The University of Central Florida, 2nd largest school in the nation, just returned the FNP and ANP MSN programs to their offerings. They still offer a DNP, but it is a different program. The MSN is no longer an "opt out" from the DNP.

    What does that tell you? DNP by 2015 is dead (but, I suspect, will remain alive as a rumor for a very long time...).

    I bet that many other schools will return to MSN programs. Why? Allowing students to opt out of the DNP at the master's level is killing degree completion rates. Since the DNP is NOT going to be required by 2015, few students are doing the whole program.
    Last edit by OnceMore on Mar 23, '13 : Reason: can!t typ#&e
    scwolf and priorities2 like this.
  9. Visit  jlynn2303} profile page
    1
    Ok, so what does this mean - American Association of Colleges of Nursing | Frequently Asked Questions

    I'd just like to be able to figure this out once and for all!

    Inquiring Nurses want to know!

    Who actually has the final say, for everyone, for all time?

    Where does the buck stop?
    kalevra likes this.
  10. Visit  kalevra} profile page
    0
    Quote from jlynn2303
    Ok, so what does this mean - American Association of Colleges of Nursing | Frequently Asked Questions

    I'd just like to be able to figure this out once and for all!

    Inquiring Nurses want to know!

    Who actually has the final say, for everyone, for all time?

    Where does the buck stop?
    I am also interested on who has the last word on education requirements. I have my own theory, which is there is no actual single body.
  11. Visit  wtbcrna} profile page
    1
    Quote from kalevra
    I am also interested on who has the last word on education requirements. I have my own theory, which is there is no actual single body.
    It depends on the type of APN you are on who has the final say in the type of degree needed for certification. With CRNAs it is our Council of Accreditation (COA). The COA determined that all new CRNAs graduating in 2025 or later would graduate with a doctorate degree. With NPs it would be determined by their accrediting center. State BONs can also determine that a minimum degree is needed. The AACN DNP requirement statement is only a suggestion. The statement from the AACN carries no binding weight other than the influence that the AACN has.

    The DNP is not designed to give students more clinical experience. It is supposed to be designed to make APNs experts in the utilization of EBP. Most APNs or other healthcare providers will rarely change their practice from the way they are taught. Currently, it takes 17+ years for research to make it into practice, and for most healthcare providers they will only make a change in their practice when they are forced to.

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing | DNP Fact Sheet

    "INTRODUCING THE DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    • In many institutions, advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), including Nurse Practitioners, Clinical Nurse Specialists, Certified Nurse Mid-Wives, and Certified Nurse Anesthetists, are prepared in master's-degree programs that often carry a credit load equivalent to doctoral degrees in the other health professions. AACN's position statement calls for educating APRNs and nurses seeking top systems/organizational roles in DNP programs.
    • DNP curricula build on traditional master's programs by providing education in evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems leadership, among other key areas.
    • The DNP is designed for nurses seeking a terminal degree in nursing practice and offers an alternative to research-focused doctoral programs. DNP-prepared nurses are well-equipped to fully implement the science developed by nurse researchers prepared in PhD, DNSc, and other research-focused nursing doctorates.

    WHY MOVE TO THE DNP?

    • The changing demands of this nation's complex healthcare environment require the highest level of scientific knowledge and practice expertise to assure quality patient outcomes. The Institute of Medicine, Joint Commission, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other authorities have called for reconceptualizing educational programs that prepare today’s health professionals.
    • Some of the many factors building momentum for change in nursing education at the graduate level include: the rapid expansion of knowledge underlying practice; increased complexity of patient care; national concerns about the quality of care and patient safety; shortages of nursing personnel which demands a higher level of preparation for leaders who can design and assess care; shortages of doctorally-prepared nursing faculty; and increasing educational expectations for the preparation of other members of the healthcare team.
    • In a 2005 report titled Advancing the Nation's Health Needs: NIH Research Training Programs, the National Academy of Sciences called for nursing to develop a non-research clinical doctorate to prepare expert practitioners who can also serve as clinical faculty. AACN's work to advance the DNP is consistent with this call to action.
    • Nursing is moving in the direction of other health professions in the transition to the DNP. Medicine (MD), Dentistry (DDS), Pharmacy (PharmD), Psychology (PsyD), Physical Therapy (DPT), and Audiology (AudD) all offer practice doctorates."
    kalevra likes this.
  12. Visit  priorities2} profile page
    0
    Quote from jlynn2303
    Ok, so what does this mean - American Association of Colleges of Nursing | Frequently Asked Questions

    I'd just like to be able to figure this out once and for all!

    Inquiring Nurses want to know!

    Who actually has the final say, for everyone, for all time?

    Where does the buck stop?
    It's not the AACN, but actual state law. Right?
  13. Visit  wtbcrna} profile page
    0
    Quote from priorities2
    It's not the AACN, but actual state law. Right?
    It is the APNs accrediting organization and the state BON requirements (state law) that can determine the degree needed to practice as an APN.
  14. Visit  tryingtohaveitall} profile page
    0
    I find PNCB's statement reassuring- http://www.pncb.org/ptistore/resourc.../forms/DNP.pdf


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