Tired of certain teachers

  1. I have to vent real quick. Here I am on a Friday at 4:00 still at work when school got out a half hour ago. A teacher that I am close with told me how the 7th grade teacher was complaining about me because I wasn't up in her classroom to escort the student with the knee injury on crutches (see other post) down the stairs exactly at 3:15. Excuse me but that was not the time I said I would be up there, I was currently writing up an accident report on an injured preschooler (my school is prek-8th) and I have basically been running around all day or on the phone with parents.

    No lunch, no twenty potty breaks (the teachers all use my bathroom) and I had to skip a pumping session because I was babysitting an autistic student acting up in class. So now on a Friday when I want to be going home to my five babies, I'm sitting in my closet pumping and then documenting everything from today because I'm behind on a lot of documenting because the teachers send me every bruise and runny nose under the sun!

    And I know nurses stay late often, I always did at my other nursing job and here as well. But don't you dare talk about me behind my back when I go completely out of my way for everyone here. Sorry for the vent, I had to get it out. It's something with the middle school teachers lately. The 8th grade teacher complained last week because I have to pump for my four month old. You bet I printed out articles about the right to pump at work!
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   KKEGS
    I feel ya. Today a middle school student came in and said, "My teacher sent me here because this thumb feels like it needs to pop. Also when I make a fist, this thumb doesn't go down as far as this thumb and it's kind of blue right here."

    First of all: Who the heck is this teacher that sent you to the NURSE for such a ridiculous reason?!? Secondly, that area that is "blue right here" is a vein! And third, I don't "pop" joints. I am not a chiropractor! Want an ice pack? No? Go back to class.

    She walked out mumbling, "Well that was a waste of a pass." UGH!!!!!
  4. by   abc123RN
    Pre K teacher brought me one that cried all morning, because the other kids wouldn't play with him. Yes I talked to the child and asked a few questions to find out why he was crying, the teacher said he would not talk to her, I think he is pretty smart kid, I don't want to talk to her either!!
  5. by   NurseBeans
    I feel ya--tough week with my teachers. At the end of the day I think they just do not understand our job. And how could they? You could always offer to let them observe you for a day. Then they might sort of understand why you aren't johnny-on-the-spot for the kid on crutches. Which, by the way, does not require a nurse. Hello? It's crutches.
  6. by   jaderook01
    Quote from momto5RN
    I have to vent real quick. Here I am on a Friday at 4:00 still at work when school got out a half hour ago. A teacher that I am close with told me how the 7th grade teacher was complaining about me because I wasn't up in her classroom to escort the student with the knee injury on crutches (see other post) down the stairs exactly at 3:15. Excuse me but that was not the time I said I would be up there, I was currently writing up an accident report on an injured preschooler (my school is prek-8th) and I have basically been running around all day or on the phone with parents.

    No lunch, no twenty potty breaks (the teachers all use my bathroom) and I had to skip a pumping session because I was babysitting an autistic student acting up in class. So now on a Friday when I want to be going home to my five babies, I'm sitting in my closet pumping and then documenting everything from today because I'm behind on a lot of documenting because the teachers send me every bruise and runny nose under the sun!

    And I know nurses stay late often, I always did at my other nursing job and here as well. But don't you dare talk about me behind my back when I go completely out of my way for everyone here. Sorry for the vent, I had to get it out. It's something with the middle school teachers lately. The 8th grade teacher complained last week because I have to pump for my four month old. You bet I printed out articles about the right to pump at work!
    I'm sorry you've had a rough time. We all need to vent sometimes. However, I see it from both sides. I was a teacher for many years.

    Just to caution you though: Just because you're "close" to someone doesn't mean that they aren't misrepresenting other people to you. Unless you hear it from the source in question, I'd take it with a grain of salt.

    Teachers are stressed out just like you are. Teachers are not always in the know as to what constitutes a medical problem, et cetera. Some likely just want problem kids out of their hair and are willing to cling on to anything for a break, so you're the unwitting victim of their desperation. The school administration and their lack of support is largely to blame for most of your woes (and theirs).

    Plenty of teachers also wind up staying way past time to do their own work. Lots of them wind up taking their work home. They aren't compensated for it. They also have families. They are also on the phone with parents, can't use the bathroom when they like, and have to document every bit of foolishness that comes along.

    I have found that there is no difference in my bathroom habits as a nurse and as a teacher. I have found that there is no difference in the number of annoying phone calls I must engage in. I have found that I have to stay late sometimes as a nurse, except I now get paid for that time whereas I didn't before. I still must document everything to cover my @**. There is still stress. There is still pettiness. The only difference is my work doesn't go home with me now.

    ETA: I'm not trying to attack you. My district didn't even get school nurses until after I left- and only the elementary schools and the school for teen mothers has them even now. We actually had to go through in services where some of us were trained in how to deal with basic first aid. I had to get CPR training in order for my team to even go on field trips. I was the one that dispensed meds to the students on my team. There was never a school nurse for me to ever send students to.
    Last edit by jaderook01 on Mar 11
  7. by   moreoreo
    It's not feasible but I wish I could shadow a teacher for a day and they could shadow me for a day. Same with office staff, social worker, principal, everyone else!

    One day last week, a teacher came in with a question about a student who had come in to see me earlier and remarked as I looked through my visit cards, "are those all from today?!" Or sometimes, a teacher will walk in and look surprised at the 7 kids filling the room as I am trying to document their complaints. Or, someone will witness my being called out of my lunch to take a wheelchair to the gym and voice their pity of me. And in these moments, I feel oddly vindicated! But I feel badly that I have no insight into what the teachers are dealing with on a daily basis from my secluded office. And this mutual lack of awareness of each other is probably why nurses and teachers sometimes clash.

    As for teachers talking behind your back, that is just wrong and petty. I am new and as far as I know everyone's been very welcoming but I do still feel like it's "me against the world" (even though I work with a health aide so I'm not actually alone). To be honest, in your shoes I would probably reach out to each teacher and tell her upfront that I heard she had a concern, in order to address it and try to at least end with us understanding one another. But it's still wrong and I'm sorry you have gone through that!
  8. by   OyWithThePoodles
    You pump. Do not skip a pumping session again. You legally have the right to, now granted they don't have to pay you for it, but you must pump. (I myself have printed out breastfeeding laws when working in the hospital)

    I'm not sure why it requires a nurse to walk the student down the stairs? I am also unsure as to why you were "babysitting" the autistic child having a meltdown, that sounds like the teachers job. Or behavior therapist. Maybe the other staff at your school need a wake up call and need to realize that some of the things you are doing (and missing out on pumping) aren't your responsibility. (Unless of course in your district you do in fact have to sit with a child while they have a meltdown-in which case that's crazy).

    I know how frustrating it can be and I wish there was more I could say to help you. I had people asking me why I was still pumping, "She's 12 months old, I think it's time to cut the cord." Some people are jerks, and some people just don't understand what all we have to do. Enlighten them.
  9. by   DEgalRN
    I'm sorry that you had a rough day. When everything just piles on, it can feel overwhelming. And I'll be honest, I'm livid on your behalf about the losing your pumping session! It's one thing to have a medical emergency where you can't pump. But babysitting? Uh no, not gonna fly. There needs to be something in place so if that happens again, there is backup for that 20-30 minutes.

    And why are you pumping in a closet?!? Can we get you a nice space to pump?

    I agree though, don't put too much stock in a game of telephone. Who knows what kind of day either one of those teachers was having. Unless it impacts you somehow (like, you get reported for, I don't know, having to do nursing things so slightly inconveniencing a teacher who needs to learn to suck it up?), try and forget it.

    Many, many hugs!
  10. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    I have seen it from both sides - I teach health, so currently I am managing my clinic and teaching 8 classes a week. And nope, I do not get a designated prep period for any of my classes. So I'm at work usually one hour early when I teach and stay late. I can never get to the copier because it is upstairs and almost every time I try to go to it, I meet a child on the stairs. On a day I teach 4 class periods (out of 7), I have still had 30+ visits, most non-urgent. Teachers were given my schedule multiple times and very few acknowledge it. It is on my door. Students know it better than most of the teaching staff . My admin are awesome and supportive, thankfully.

    But I know how frustrating it can be to how a student ask multiple times to see the nurse while trying to get through a lesson. Students do this TO ME while I am teaching and they KNOW I am the nurse. I do get to smile and say, "Good thing you're in my class, so you can sit tight and I'll keep an eye on you while you learn."

    But...I was pulled out of health class for a student that lost a baby tooth. No active bleeding by the time I reached the student, student rinsed mouth, got envelope for tooth. Could have checked in with me after class.

    And I'm sorry you have to pump in a closet! That is terrible. My school actually have a small room called the "mom" room and you can sign-up for uninterrupted pumping time. I forget that other places don't do the same even thought they should be required to. ::hugs::
  11. by   nursetlm
    Ridiculous. I'm sorry.
  12. by   SchoolNurseTXstyle
    I think we can all say there is a disconnect between teachers and nurses as we have not walked in each other's shoes. However, at the end of the day -WE ARE ALL HUMAN. I think we would support any staff member that needs to eat, utilize the bathroom or provide food for their baby. It just doesn't seem like that support is reciprocated. We must take care of our own basic needs to care for others.
  13. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Remember that teachers, with a few exceptions, have been in schools their whole life. They do not comprehend the real life work world and their worldview is reflective of it. Now, add on the martyr cloak that both nurses and teachers love to wear and it provides for a myopic and sometimes egocentric worldview. Not being mean or condescending, just trying to give a better view of what you are dealing with. The only control we have is our response, and that can be tempered through understanding. They will never understand our view, most don't even want to, all we can do is approach them from where they live and try to find a common ground.
  14. by   momto5RN
    Thanks for listening!! After a day off for snow and a delayed opening today, I'm feeling better. I read back what I typed and feel like I came off snotty or bratty! Just a tough day. I do agree with the above that I don't exactly know what a teacher's day is like and they don't know what mine is like. I sometimes feel like they must think that I just sit and twiddle my thumbs waiting for students to come in. I'm hoping the rest of the week flies by!! And the best part of this week is that all of my screenings are finally done!!!

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