Tips for....

  1. ....screening hearing and vision on Kinder through 2nd grade.

    And GO!!
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  2. 31 Comments

  3. by   GdBSN
    Do they know their alphabet??? Have you tried the tumbling E. Are your students having problems understanding the directions? Is there a language barrier? Or are you just having problems logistically scheduling the screenings?
  4. by   dakotadenise
    I had our Lion's club come and use their Spot Screener for vision this year. It works great with the little ones. Sorry I can't help with hearing - our SLP's do them.
  5. by   WineRN
    I just did Kinders for the first time... and oh my goodness. It's like wrangling a bunch of puppies and getting them all to listen at the same time (and I only had 3 at a time sent to me!)

    My biggest tips are:
    *Do the minimum requirement for them unless there is a request for more. Since this was my first time I just used all of the testing things we had at first (wall chart, near vision, color blind and bincoular test) and it took me 15 mins a student. I called another nurse in my district who explained that we ONLY test far vision because it is just a screening and that is all our state requires.

    *Put out books for the others who are waiting or have a parent come and help by reading to the ones waiting to distract them. They all want to help each other.

    *I drew a smiley face on the tape I had on the ground and I would tell them "Toes on the face" and that helped.

    A lot more than I expected didn't know their letters OR shapes. So I'm rescreening with a SPOT machine
    Last edit by WineRN on Sep 28 : Reason: I forgot something
  6. by   C.MackeyRN
    Quote from GdBSN
    Do they know their alphabet??? Have you tried the tumbling E. Are your students having problems understanding the directions? Is there a language barrier? Or are you just having problems logistically scheduling the screenings?
    Per their teacher, most don't, so I plan on using the Tumbling E chart. Since I haven't started yet (I wanted to go in with as much arsenal as I could) I haven't determined their level of understanding directions. I shouldn't have any language barriers and scheduling isn't a problem. I was just wanting tips to make it go as easy as I could!
    Last edit by C.MackeyRN on Sep 28 : Reason: Hit "save" too soon
  7. by   C.MackeyRN
    Quote from WineRN
    I just did Kinders for the first time... and oh my goodness. It's like wrangling a bunch of puppies and getting them all to listen at the same time (and I only had 3 at a time sent to me!)

    My biggest tips are:
    *Do the minimum requirement for them unless there is a request for more. Since this was my first time I just used all of the testing things we had at first (wall chart, near vision, color blind and bincoular test) and it took me 15 mins a student. I called another nurse in my district who explained that we ONLY test far vision because it is just a screening and that is all our state requires.

    *Put out books for the others who are waiting or have a parent come and help by reading to the ones waiting to distract them. They all want to help each other.

    *I drew a smiley face on the tape I had on the ground and I would tell them "Toes on the face" and that helped.

    A lot more than I expected didn't know their letters OR shapes. So I'm rescreening with a SPOT machine
    I really like the smiley face on the tape idea! Since I only have 1 kinder class, I'm actually just going to go to them so they'll be in their class room and maybe feel a little more comfortable. Plus, their teacher will be there so she'll help with those who are waiting
  8. by   GdBSN
    Try to get an aide to help you, might help with the chaos. When I did elementary, I would screen 3-5 at a time. Also, try to do their Acanthosis at the same time. When I was putting the headphones on them, I would examine their neck, literally like 2 seconds, and you are done with all three exams at once.
  9. by   BethG73
    Quote from GdBSN
    Do they know their alphabet??? Have you tried the tumbling E. Are your students having problems understanding the directions? Is there a language barrier? Or are you just having problems logistically scheduling the screenings?
    I read somewhere that the Tumbline E chart isn't recommended, for a reason I can't recall right now.

    I know you're not supposed to, but for first grade I have a pointer that I use as necessary, and put a post-it under the line I want them to read on the near chart. For little kiddos who may not know all their letters I have a chart with house, circle, square & apple shapes.
  10. by   OldDude
    Use the tumbling E for KG and the Letters chart for the others. Pass the "E" chart and some headphones that resemble your audiometer headphones to the KG teachers the day before you screen and ask them to "practice" with the students. Hopefully when you screen they'll have some idea of what's going on. You only need to screen 1st graders for AN so, as GdBSN mentioned, don't miss that opportunity while you have them in front of you.

    I use paper water cups for occluders and toss them into the trash after each kid.

    It would be helpful if you had someone to help wrangle and herd the kids for you.
  11. by   OldDude
    Quote from BethG73
    I read somewhere that the Tumbline E chart isn't recommended, for a reason I can't recall right now.

    I know you're not supposed to, but for first grade I have a pointer that I use as necessary, and put a post-it under the line I want them to read on the near chart. For little kiddos who may not know all their letters I have a chart with house, circle, square & apple shapes.
    In Texas the only charts approved for vision screening are HOTV, Tumbling E, and Sloan Letters; no symbols or picture. SPOT screener for age 5 and younger.
  12. by   Kittery
    My school is all pre-K and we have to use the HOTV chart, the kids get a card with HOTV on it and just point to the one that matches. But maybe that's only valid in TX ...
    I got this from the previous nurse but she got kid sunglasses, popped out the lenses, and covered one side with a fun shape. Way easier than having little ones try to hold an occluder or cup to their eye.
    I get 3-5 kids at a time with a teaching assistant, explain the directions to the group, and give each kid a chance to show me they're able to match the letters up close. Having the TA or teacher there really helps.
    I start with just a few of the really large letters to build their confidence and ensure they're understanding the matching part.
    I've found that with hearing, I have to help a lot of them understand the procedure by playing the tone and raising their hand for them a few times before they catch on.

    It takes FOREVER for me to screen these littles! This is probably the only time I miss my middle schoolers who breezed through screenings.
  13. by   Riley RN
    Are you in New York?
  14. by   C.MackeyRN
    Quote from OldDude
    Use the tumbling E for KG and the Letters chart for the others. Pass the "E" chart and some headphones that resemble your audiometer headphones to the KG teachers the day before you screen and ask them to "practice" with the students. Hopefully when you screen they'll have some idea of what's going on. You only need to screen 1st graders for AN so, as GdBSN mentioned, don't miss that opportunity while you have them in front of you.

    I use paper water cups for occluders and toss them into the trash after each kid.

    It would be helpful if you had someone to help wrangle and herd the kids for you.
    Passing the equipment around the day before is a great idea. I'll definitely do that. Also, this is the first year I've had K-2nd. I was not aware of the AN screening, so I'm glad y'all mentioned it. Is it just a quick look and you're done, kind of thing?

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