Strange hearing screening question

  1. I have a student that I screened his hearing earlier in the year. He failed my screening. I visited with mom. She was great to work with. She said he had already had tubes and had been under the care of an ENT for a long time. Since it was for a Special Ed. referral, she went ahead and took him for another hearing test, which he passed.
    Today, I screened the rest of his class, and even though I didn't really need to. I re-screened this student. Today, it was much quieter and better conditions for an even more accurate screen. This student indicated the ear that he heard the "beeps" in was the opposite side that the machine actually did. I re-positioned the ear phones, made sure that I wasn't crazy and had them on the correct way. I even turned the head phones around and he still indicated the exact opposite of what he should have been hearing according to what buttons I was pushing.
    I visited with his teacher. He is in Title 1 reading and they are beginning to wonder if he may be dyslexic or have some other "wiring" problem.
    Have any of you ever heard of anything like this with the hearing screening?
    I am stumped and wondering if there may be a connection with a "wiring" problem as associated with possible Dyslexia? or am I just over-thinking this with my "nurse brain"?
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   MrNurse(x2)
    This may seem like it is out of left field, but is he left hand dominant? Being left handed myself (really ambidextrous), I find I switch my left and right directions frequently. I have learned to self correct this, but was an issue in my youth.
  4. by   Farawyn
    Whoa...

    *gets the popcorn and prepares to learn something*
  5. by   Cattz
    Good question. I will check. When I was visiting with the teacher. We were talking about a couple students. I know she said that one, if not both of the students in question actually are left handed. That's good info. Thanks for sharing that.
  6. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Another thought, you may want to find out if the ENT tests only for sound heard as opposed to right/left differentiation. Maybe he has some neural pathway issue going on.
  7. by   Cattz
    Quote from Farawyn
    Whoa...

    *gets the popcorn and prepares to learn something*
    Meee Toooo Far! This fascinates me. I am kind of wondering if this may be somehow complicated and comparable to my kiddos that pass my vision screenings, and the teacher and I still don't think that something is right with the students vision. We convince the parent to take them to our local optometrists. They pass there. But, we continue to pursue it, and low and behold.....I have had more than one student end up needing vision therapy. Which requires a specialty Optometrist in functional and developmental vision care.
  8. by   OldDude
    You're overthinking it. I don't care which hand they raise for which ear or if they raise both hands at the same time as long as their reaction is appropriate. If this was the one in a million anomaly the ENT would most certainly recognize it. The bottom line is the kid can hear the beeps. Mr probably has the best explanation above.
  9. by   Cattz
    I hope so OD. These kinds of things make me crazy(er).
  10. by   Farawyn
    Quote from OldDude
    You're overthinking it. I don't care which hand they raise for which ear or if they raise both hands at the same time as long as their reaction is appropriate. If this was the one in a million anomaly the ENT would most certainly recognize it. The bottom line is the kid can hear the beeps. Mr probably has the best explanation above.
    Party Pooper.
  11. by   ctate
    (I it the quote button on OD's comment)

    My thoughts, too. Here on the high school level, if they raise a hand when I push the button it's a pass for me.
  12. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from ctate
    (I it the quote button on OD's comment)

    My thoughts, too. Here on the high school level, if they raise a hand when I push the button it's a pass for me.
    Yep, same.
  13. by   aprilmoss
    I've had audiograms done over the years. Only had to indicate (either by button press or by verbal statement) that I heard something. Never had to indicate left versus right.

    My daughter (a former GT who went on to excel in college), never could tell left from right without a lot of difficulty.
  14. by   tining
    Recheck your screener handbook (at least in Texas). Raising right/left with beep is not necessary, any kind of response with beep is the rule. I have had kids say beep, or even high five as a response.

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