Staff Hysteria - page 4

I'm a school nurse and I'm going crazy! I feel as if some kind of mass hysteria has settled over this school, and it's not the kids. It's the staff! I'd like to hear some thoughts about one of my... Read More

  1. by   AdobeRN
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    What does it say on her IEP...?
    My husband has 2 employees - young people in their 20's that have legal paperwork on file with HR regarding their asthma issues - these 2 employees are allowed to miss work quite frequently due to their "asthma" issues and not be penalized or written up for it. He finds it absolutely ridiculus when they are out.

    I think its funny that they have basically an IEP/504 for adults in the workplace.
  2. by   OldDude
    Quote from AdobeRN
    My husband has 2 employees - young people in their 20's that have legal paperwork on file with HR regarding their asthma issues - these 2 employees are allowed to miss work quite frequently due to their "asthma" issues and not be penalized or written up for it. He finds it absolutely ridiculus when they are out.

    I think its funny that they have basically an IEP/504 for adults in the workplace.
    HMMM, I think I'll get a note from my MD stating I've developed pedophobia and I can only work from home.
  3. by   HyzenthlayLPN
    Quote from AdobeRN
    My husband has 2 employees - young people in their 20's that have legal paperwork on file with HR regarding their asthma issues - these 2 employees are allowed to miss work quite frequently due to their "asthma" issues and not be penalized or written up for it. He finds it absolutely ridiculus when they are out.

    I think its funny that they have basically an IEP/504 for adults in the workplace.
    That sounds like FMLA intermittent leave. There is a limit on the amount of time that can be taken under FMLA. Does your husband know who tracks their FMLA time?
  4. by   AdobeRN
    Quote from HyzenthlayLPN
    That sounds like FMLA intermittent leave. There is a limit on the amount of time that can be taken under FMLA. Does your husband know who tracks their FMLA time?
    It must be HR that does the tracking - he feels his hands are tied and can never say anything to these people about missing work - it just drives him crazy. I told him he needed to tell these people to find a new doctor to treat their asthma because whatever they are doing is not working if they are missing that much work.
  5. by   HyzenthlayLPN
    Quote from AdobeRN
    It must be HR that does the tracking - he feels his hands are tied and can never say anything to these people about missing work - it just drives him crazy. I told him he needed to tell these people to find a new doctor to treat their asthma because whatever they are doing is not working if they are missing that much work.
    He could get into trouble for that. Asthma can be considered a disability (so ADA) and with FMLA any absences covered by FMLA can't be considered as absences in things like performance reviews, etc. But again, there is a limit. FMLA covers 12 weeks...so 480 hours per 12 months or 60 8-hour shifts.

    I will say that some employers are more strict about tracking time than others...
  6. by   Irish_Mist
    What about her students? This woman needs to get her act together and take her medications as prescribed. You are not there to be her personal nurse. I would be furious if I was in her position. I would also be furious if she was my son's teacher. Her stupidity is a distraction to her students and a menace to you.

    ETA: I also believe this is an attention seeking pattern. I think she enjoys the spotlight. I also agree if you throw around words like liability, danger, risk, and those sort of things that administration will change their tune. I suggest calling 911 in the future.
    Last edit by Irish_Mist on Oct 25
  7. by   Kooky Korky
    Your director needs an enema.
  8. by   janetpa
    Please be sure to document everything encounter you have with her. If you have a conversation regarding this, send a follow up email summarizing what was said and be sure to keep a hard copy in a safe place. You want to be sure that you have covered yourself in case she says "oh nurse so-so never told me that"
    I agree that the administration should be brought into the conversation too. If she has a seizure and is alone with students , that could be a safety issue as well.
  9. by   schoolnurse61
    I had an employee like this once who had migraines and a list of other diagnosis and would come shuffling into school most days with sun glasses on and always come straight to my office and expect me to care for her medical needs. She had injectable meds that she at times could not even give to herself so i had to develop a policy related to administering employee medications during the day which required a doctor signature.
    She also took some narcotics if the injectables did not work for her.
    She was in an itinerant position so she had kids on and off during the day. It became a true safety issue for the children as she at times was so impaired she couldn't walk, talk, drive. Thank goodness i had full administration support and documented every encounter with her and they eventually was able to terminate her position. This took years though.
    I would document, document, document and let admin know each and every time you have to care for her. Your first and foremost responsibility is to the students and if she is non-compliant with the medication regimen i would call 911 EVERYTIME she comes in. Sounds very much attention seeking as well so the paramedics can give her all the attention she craves!
  10. by   mudd68
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    OP, if you hit the "quote" button instead of the "reply" button, it will copy the text of the person you are responding to - it makes it a little easier to follow the conversation. Just trying to give a helpful hint!

    Secondly, are you calling 911 every time she has a seizure? I don't know if it would help or not, since she might just enjoy the fuss...but maybe she would get tired of the medical bills. And more people would be telling her to take her darn meds. I'm not a school nurse (I just like it here), so my suggestion might not apply. What a frustrating situation!
    THIS! I work teletriage in an office setting with a large group of non clinical staff that take non symptom based calls, schedule appointments, print reminder letters and so forth. Now and then - a staff member becomes "too ill to work" and they always want to run to one of us nurses to "triage" them. Administration has said our staff nurses cannot be held responsible for ill staff. We don't have the resources of a clinic/ED/urgent care! We work in an office setting! It's a huge liability issue. We are now told that if a staff member is too ill to work and or drive home - they need to arrange to be picked up or we call 911. A couple have been caught off guard with complaints of "chest pain" "asthma attack" "feeling dizzy" thinking they would be given the pass to just go home for the day. NOPE - 911 IS called - we can't let someone report those type of symptoms and just look at them (no assessment tools in the office) as an RN and determine if it's something serious or not. Maybe check with someone in your "legal" department regarding this issue?
  11. by   Jedrnurse
    Are you in a union (and have a contract)? Being "required" to provide services to a co-worker on a regular basis might be grievable...
  12. by   BeckyESRN
    Any updates OP?
  13. by   kidzcare
    Quote from schoolnurse61
    I had an employee like this once who had migraines and a list of other diagnosis and would come shuffling into school most days with sun glasses on and always come straight to my office and expect me to care for her medical needs. She had injectable meds that she at times could not even give to herself so i had to develop a policy related to administering employee medications during the day which required a doctor signature.
    I'm glad you worked out a plan! I don't think I'd be covered to give injections to an employee without orders! A couple years ago I had a pregnant teacher who needed an injection once a week and her husband was taught how but squeamish. She asked if I would do it and I told her that I could do it as a friend (who happens to know how to do it), in the health office, after school hours.

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