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sex education in school

  1. 0 i was on the dr.phil site (i am a chronic phil watcher) and I was reading the replies to the show about sex education in schools. I was SHOCKED to read how many people believe that sex education should not be taught in school at all, but instead left entirely up to the parents. From a nursing point of view, I found this disturbing. Sex ed is more than just about a moral decision but medical consequences such as STDs, pregnancy, etc.

    What are your opinions?
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  2. 61 Comments

  3. Visit  Aneroo profile page
    #1 1
    I think it needs to be taught in schools. And I think ALL of it needs to be taught, not just abstinence.
    I live in the bible belt, and the kids are basically told "Just don't do it". What good is that doing? I had a high school classmate who took sex ed while she lived in NYC. She said if she had seen the pictures before she had sex, she never would have. They actually showed them pictures of genital warts and herpes and other diseases!
    I don't think parents would do a hot job of teaching it. I would fear too many would say "Just don't do it" and let that be it.
  4. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #2 1
    I realize that it's part of the teen makeup to think they are immune to consequences and that denial rules. But I still think the sex education system in America is in need of improvement as evidenced by the high cost of teen pregancy and STDs.

    But we've improved, when I was a kid people thought you could get an STD from a doornob and kissing could make you pregnant. But in an age where unprotected sex can literally kill, people need to get off their high horse and teach the nitty gritty down and dirty truth.

    It should be tough as a part of science and health classes. Leave the morality and religion for the home.
  5. Visit  tencat profile page
    #3 1
    I hate to break it to those who think sex-ed shouldn't be taught in schools but: Kids aren't listening to the "Just Say NO" message. And their woeful lack of knowledge is leading them into STD's and teen pregnancy. I've seen girls as young as 12 having babies. I've seen kids as young as 12 have STD's. If the equipment works, they're gonna use it. I don't like the idea of my daughter having sex at 12, but I like the idea of her having AIDS, pregnancy, or other associated STD's a lot less. I don't like Dr. Phil (he seems like an arrogant, pompous a$$), but I agree with him on this point.
  6. Visit  txspadequeenRN profile page
    #4 1
    I am 30 and when I turned 17 I asked my mom what sex was and this was her response " You need to be 18 before you learn about sex or anything that goes with it" ....I had a baby before I was 18. I taught my oldest daughter when she started her cycle age 10. I continue to teach her and I am not shy about it either. I have 4 daughters and there is no way I will let them start there teens years wth out knowing about sex and STD's. I strongly encourage sex ed in schools. The more trusted people teens see talking about safe sex, STD protection or abstinince the more likley they are to listen. Show them pics of warts and disease... It is reality. If you dont want your penis to fall off then keep it out of stuff..... It is real life and truthfully some parents may not always have correct information about sex and diseases. When I taught my daughter I brought out the body atlas and all kinds of books. We had ourselves a regular old fashion , gonna get down to the nitty gritty, no holds bar sex ed class. But I am a nurse and not everybody is ... SO TEACH THEM YOUNGANS!!!!!!!
    Last edit by txspadequeenRN on Oct 10, '05
  7. Visit  ZASHAGALKA profile page
    #5 0
    And now for an alternate POV:

    Sex is one of the more spiritual aspects of who we are. As such, it has serious religious implications. Teaching sex ed in school w/out the approval of parents is a violation of the first amendment.

    The first amendment prohibits establishing a religion OR PREVENTING THE FREE EXERCISE THEREOF.

    Teaching my children concepts that run contrary to my religious beliefs is the act of preventing my free exercise of religious beliefs - and as long as my children are minors, my beliefs extend to their upbringing.

    If you insist on making the classroom a religious entity, don't be surprised if the right continues to push for 'intelligent design' and 'abstinence only'. Think it through - if we are now teaching religious concepts in school, then why shouldn't my view on religion dominate?

    And you're kidding yourself if you don't think sex isn't a religious concept.

    What is the purpose of school? If the answer is to educate our children in the 3 R's, then sex ed doesn't belong. If the answer is social engineering, then the gov't doesn't belong - and we should immediately privitize all schools and start issuing school vouchers.

    Hey, wait a minute, what a great idea!

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  8. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #6 0
    Timothy, I'm not advocating that schools change their policy about getting parental permission prior to teaching sex education. I'm saying reduce it biology and leave the spiritual out of it. Teach what it is, how reproduction works, what STDs are, and the consequences, and leave morality and religion for the churches and parents to teach.

    I may be kidding myself, but I think sex can be taught as a health/science and not a religion.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 10, '05
  9. Visit  ZASHAGALKA profile page
    #7 0
    Quote from Tweety
    Timothy, I'm not advocating that schools change their policy about getting parental permission prior to teaching sex education. I'm saying reduce it biology and leave the spiritual out of it. Teach what it is, how reproduction works, what STDs are, and the consequences, and leave morality and religion for the churches and parents to teach.

    I may be kidding myself, but I think sex can be taught as a health/science and not a religion.
    In that limited context, as a part of a biology class, with my consent, that would be acceptable (and has been - I've signed off on that before).

    But when you say 'sex ed', that implies separate content and 'programs' than just biology. Sexual reproduction and 'sex ed' are two different topics. There are programs out there that want to teach how to put on condoms, etc. That goes too far.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  10. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #8 0
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    In that limited context, as a part of a biology class, with my consent, that would be acceptable (and has been - I've signed off on that before).

    But when you say 'sex ed', that implies separate content and 'programs' than just biology. Sexual reproduction and 'sex ed' are two different topics. There are programs out there that want to teach how to put on condoms, etc. That goes too far.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I say guys need to read the inserts about how to put on a condom to prevent unwanted disease and pregancy.

    We shouldn't turn a blind eye that teens are going to have sex. Parents live in denial sometimes and rather than teach about condoms, just trust their kids will follow their teachings and not have sex. They're afraid that if their kids learn how to prevent unwanted pregancy and disease, that is the same as saying "go out and have sex". Gets a little shakey. I'm glad I don't have kids. My poor mom had to face the agonizing realization that my sister was having sex at age 16 and put her on the pill. Knowing that all the lectures in the world about making her stop were going to fall on deaf ears, and she was legal at that point.

    No, a "how to do it course" is not what I'm talking about, so perhaps we're more on the same page than we realize.
  11. Visit  ZASHAGALKA profile page
    #9 0
    Quote from Tweety
    Parents live in denial sometimes and rather than teach about condoms, just trust their kids will follow their teachings and not have sex.
    I agree with this and it is my responsibility as a parent to provide my children a variety of tools to deal w/ their sexuality. I even believe that 'abstinence only' is naive.

    But, at the very moment the gov't decides, that because what parents teach about religion is inadequate - sex outside of marriage is a sin and shouldn't be engaged in - and that the gov't should take steps to override that teaching, at that moment, the gov't has violated my religious freedom to teach my children a basic concept of religious faith without gov't interference.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  12. Visit  nurse4theplanet profile page
    #10 0
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I agree with this and it is my responsibility as a parent to provide my children a variety of tools to deal w/ their sexuality. I even believe that 'abstinence only' is naive.

    But, at the very moment the gov't decides, that because what parents teach about religion is inadequate - sex outside of marriage is a sin and shouldn't be engaged in - and that the gov't should take steps to override that teaching, at that moment, the gov't has violated my religious freedom to teach my children a basic concept of religious faith without gov't interference.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I admire your religious values and I commend you on incorporating them into your parenting. Your children are very blessed.

    However, there are children in the public school system that do not have the same guidance. Your children go to school with children of all cultures, religions, and socioeconomic backgrouds. Where do these children get guidance if mommy or daddy doesn't talk to them? Many kids come from broken homes without any role models, rules, or spiritual guidance. The only sex ed that may be available to them is through school, tv, and peers. Which of those do you think is going to provide the most correct view on sex, STDs, and such.

    I don't think the gov't is trying to control religion by addressing the need for sex education. In fact, I think it is based on a public health issue, due to the rising rate of STDs, too much sexual undertones in tv programming, and the teen pregnancy/abortion statistics. I do think it is an issue that the parents need to be involved in to make sure the information given is age appropriate. But if it is left entirely to the parents and sex ed is pulled from the education curriculum then we are doing a disservice to the children who need it the most.

    Just my two cents.
  13. Visit  ZASHAGALKA profile page
    #11 0
    I guess it comes down to my basic mistrust of the gov't 'indoctrinating' instead of educating my children.

    If the gov't wants schools to be in the social engineering business, then the gov't should get out of the business of running schools.

    That way, I can choose the philosophy of the school that I wish to 'engineer' my kiddos.

    Oh, and not only would it be cheaper on taxpayers, but teachers would get paid more because the gov't would no longer have virtual monopoly on salaries. Competition is good for both cost control and salaries.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  14. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #12 0
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I guess it comes down to my basic mistrust of the gov't 'indoctrinating' instead of educating my children.


    ~faith,
    Timothy.

    I would have the same fears if I was a parent. I don't trust the government for not allowing religious teaching back into the schools and indoctrinating them in matters of faith rather than educating them. (Teaching that sex is a religious act or from a moral standpoint, for instance.). It's happened in the past and it's it's been a struggle to get rid of it, and I'm still not trusting. Interesting the two perspectives isn't it?

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