Seizure plan and PE swimming? - page 2

This is the situation: we have two students with seizure care plans that specify they are to have 1:1 supervision while swimming. Our kids start their PE swimming after spring break. They are... Read More

  1. by   MrNurse(x2)
    So are you in a swim suit, ready to recover the student if a seizure occurs? Are you comfortable with your lifeguard skills to do that? Just wondering out loud mostly.
  2. by   kidzcare
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    So are you in a swim suit, ready to recover the student if a seizure occurs? Are you comfortable with your lifeguard skills to do that? Just wondering out loud mostly.
    I was not. I did not even know I was going on the field trip until I was on my way to work that morning.

    At the facility, there were two lifeguards for our group of 12-15 students and the two students with seizure disorders had life jackets on and at least 1:1 assist at all time. These are very high needs students. Both in wheel chairs so if they seized any day it would be a production to get them out of the harness in the wheelchair and in position to administer diastat. Another really strong argument for the nasal medication.
  3. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Flashback: When I was in high school (1970s) we had a glassed-in pool area and during lunch would routinely watch the poor freshmen in swim class. A girl DID have a seizure while in the water, in the deep end, and my math teacher and the PE teacher tried desperately to get her out of 12 feet of water. They finally got her, and she died.
    That is horrible
  4. by   BeckyESRN
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    So are you in a swim suit, ready to recover the student if a seizure occurs? Are you comfortable with your lifeguard skills to do that? Just wondering out loud mostly.
    That would be my issue with the RN being the 1:1. I'd much rather have the RN in a nursing role; clearing the area, getting medication ready, timing the seizure, ensuring safety of the student once out of the water. The few times this has come up in our schools, we've been very clear that the RN is not a chaperone, nor a babysitter, nor a 1:1, the RN is there for medications and medical emergencies only.
  5. by   chasinRT
    Quote from BeckyESRN
    That would be my issue with the RN being the 1:1. I'd much rather have the RN in a nursing role; clearing the area, getting medication ready, timing the seizure, ensuring safety of the student once out of the water. The few times this has come up in our schools, we've been very clear that the RN is not a chaperone, nor a babysitter, nor a 1:1, the RN is there for medications and medical emergencies only.
    I discussed with admin; I have not heard what they have come up with but I know that they have a plan, and it isn't me.

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