School Nurse Gives Wrong Medication

  1. This was a story on our local news last night. Would love to know what really happened.

    Parents: Child Gets Wrong Medicine at School Nurse's Office in Blackstone | NECN
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  2. 37 Comments

  3. by   kidzcare
    I can't get the link to open but I googled it and found stories from late August. Is that the same incident? A nurse that gave Ritalin instead of an inhaler?
  4. by   Flare
    Indeed - I have a thousand questions about this.
  5. by   MHDNURSE
    Quote from kidzcare
    I can't get the link to open but I googled it and found stories from late August. Is that the same incident? A nurse that gave Ritalin instead of an inhaler?
    No, a nurse gave Ritalin instead of Motrin. Happened yesterday , 7 year-old girl. Kid is totally fine. Went into office b/c hurt elbow, and news reported the nurse thought she was a different kid and gave her another kid's ritalin. Parents "don;t want to have disciplinary action taken against nurse, but want school to be aware so nurses can have better medication protocol". My question is, why alert the media and have news coverage then?
  6. by   kidzcare
    Hm. I wonder why I can't get the link to open. And I don't see any other news stories on it.
  7. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Every nurse's nightmare.
  8. by   NutmeggeRN
    I don't really understated the over the top reaction (IMHO). The nurse addressed it, owned it, didn't just let it slide, which could be easy to do. The potential is huge, but thankfully the kiddo will be ok.
  9. by   GdBSN
    I'm curious if it was a sub nurse or someone covering the clinic. It's almost December, I would think the nurse knows her students by now.
  10. by   EllBowRN
    I did a paper on Medication Errors in School Health when I was getting my BSN. There is basically NO research out there, and NO standardized approach to stop it. I agree w/ the other poster, it's every nurse's nightmare.
  11. by   kidzcare
    Quote from GdBSN
    I'm curious if it was a sub nurse or someone covering the clinic. It's almost December, I would think the nurse knows her students by now.
    I think this would depend on how large the school is. I work in a school of 1100+ and there is no way I know every student.

    But if Ritalin was given, I will guess (but not assume) that it is for a daily medication. So that student it seems like the RN would be familiar with. Seems like it would be very difficult to confuse motrin with Ritalin. I wonder if the students have very similar names? there is more to know here
  12. by   MHDNURSE
    Quote from kidzcare
    I think this would depend on how large the school is. I work in a school of 1100+ and there is no way I know every student.

    But if Ritalin was given, I will guess (but not assume) that it is for a daily medication. So that student it seems like the RN would be familiar with. Seems like it would be very difficult to confuse motrin with Ritalin. I wonder if the students have very similar names? there is more to know here
    Exactly- Ritalin is a daily medication, given at the same time every day at school. Wouldn't she have been getting it fir a while? Just weird story...
  13. by   kidzcare
    Quote from MHDNURSE
    Exactly- Ritalin is a daily medication, given at the same time every day at school. Wouldn't she have been getting it fir a while? Just weird story...
    The only exception that I can think of is that I have a couple students who keep 2 or 3 pills here in case the morning dose is forgotten and they don't take an afternoon dose. I get a PRN order from the dr saying "administer X mg of Y medication if pt forgets to take dose at home"

    However, I don't take the kid's word for it. I always call to confirm with a parent that the dose was forgotten before administering.
  14. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    I don't really understated the over the top reaction (IMHO). The nurse addressed it, owned it, didn't just let it slide, which could be easy to do. The potential is huge, but thankfully the kiddo will be ok.
    Because it is scary. Scary for the nurse, scary for the public.

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