Pittsburg in the news - page 3

I know there has to be more to this story. I really hope that nurse documented everything she saw and did. Early on in my school nurse career I went to a workshop put on by the local children's... Read More

  1. by   peacockblue
    Totally off topic and don't want to be sassy but those of us who live here like to point out that Pittsburgh is spelled with an "h". We are quirky like that.
  2. by   CelticGoddess
    Quote from peacockblue
    Totally off topic and don't want to be sassy but those of us who live here like to point out that Pittsburgh is spelled with an "h". We are quirky like that. ������
    My first thought was "where the "h"" and don't live there. I'm just a Pens fan!
  3. by   aprilmoss
    I've been on both sides of this being both the School Nurse and the mother of a diabetic student. I'm sorry but I have to side with the parent. There are certain times when a child of reasonable competence should be able to carry and self-administer medication without bureaucratic interference. It took the threats of a 504 lawsuit to budge the bureaucracy in our student over my son carrying his insulin and meter. It's an abuse of the student's right under IDEA and ADA and it's medically unsound and dangerous to the child.
  4. by   OldDude
    Quote from aprilmoss
    I've been on both sides of this being both the School Nurse and the mother of a diabetic student. I'm sorry but I have to side with the parent. There are certain times when a child of reasonable competence should be able to carry and self-administer medication without bureaucratic interference. It took the threats of a 504 lawsuit to budge the bureaucracy in our student over my son carrying his insulin and meter. It's an abuse of the student's right under IDEA and ADA and it's medically unsound and dangerous to the child.
    I don't know about your state but in Texas all we need for a student to self-carry is a note from his/her doctor along with the management plan. Bingo - done!!
  5. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from GdBSN
    ^^^Yes!^^^ If this student has had this condition since 1st grade, why did Mom not have the proper paper work completed in the clinic. Parents get lazy and don't do what they are supposed to, and then want to blame someone when something happens. Our policy clearly states, that a student is not to have an inhaler at school unless proper documentation has been submitted. Not to say, I would not let them use there inhaler if they were having an asthma attack and address the paperwork issue with parents when they came to pick them up. Technically, I could probably lose my job for letting them use the inhaler, but I guess I would take that chance if the attack was severe enough.
    And a nurse should not have to work under those conditions. Parents need to get the paperwork to nurses or come give the inhaler themselves or 911 should be called. Of course, will anyone back up the poor nurse?
  6. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from aprilmoss
    I've been on both sides of this being both the School Nurse and the mother of a diabetic student. I'm sorry but I have to side with the parent. There are certain times when a child of reasonable competence should be able to carry and self-administer medication without bureaucratic interference. It took the threats of a 504 lawsuit to budge the bureaucracy in our student over my son carrying his insulin and meter. It's an abuse of the student's right under IDEA and ADA and it's medically unsound and dangerous to the child.
    The least the parent can do is get you the written orders. Very rude and disrespectful to do do so.
  7. by   moreoreo
    Like others, I have to admit I would have allowed the student to use the inhaler if he was wheezing, or even if he simply c/o symptoms that warranted its use. Especially if I managed to get mom on the phone verifying that it was his inhaler. Especially if he had documentation on file for previous years allowing use of the same medication. It would be a lengthy visit note but I would rather stand up for why I violated a school policy than why I withheld medication from a child in distress. However, I do think the parent has to shoulder some blame in this situation. Yes, parents are busy and it's hard to get paperwork turned in on top of other busyness, but if the school has "known about his severe asthma since first grade," then she should also be aware of their policy by now. I am sure there is more to this story than the article reveals.
  8. by   aprilmoss
    Quote from OldDude
    I don't know about your state but in Texas all we need for a student to self-carry is a note from his/her doctor along with the management plan. Bingo - done!!
    Alas, such was not the case in our district. A student can't even carry a glucose tablet, but rather it had to be dispensed by the nurse. It was a particular issue with my son as he had a split day, half at a regular high school, and half at an "academy" (what we used to call vo-tech).
  9. by   OldDude
    Quote from aprilmoss
    Alas, such was not the case in our district. A student can't even carry a glucose tablet, but rather it had to be dispensed by the nurse. It was a particular issue with my son as he had a split day, half at a regular high school, and half at an "academy" (what we used to call vo-tech).
    You can fix that.
  10. by   Windchaser22
    Quote from aprilmoss
    Alas, such was not the case in our district. A student can't even carry a glucose tablet, but rather it had to be dispensed by the nurse. It was a particular issue with my son as he had a split day, half at a regular high school, and half at an "academy" (what we used to call vo-tech).
    The law trumps policy.
  11. by   SullyRN
    Quote from Windchaser22
    The law trumps policy.
    With the mom of the diabetic student, the policy from her district is crap, if there's an order, they should be able to carry it.

    BUT... Law states I cannot dispense medicine without a doctors order. This is from NSO.com (because that's all I had time to google)
    In an emergency, you may think you do not have enough time to obtain a physician’s order before providing life-saving medication to a hospitalized patient. This is not sufficient reason to provide the medication, however, because in doing so you could be stepping outside the scope of your clinical privileges. Depending on your facility’s procedures, you may well be taking a risk that jeopardizes your patient, your facility and your ability to practice nursing. If at all possible, get an order first.

    If you provide emergency care to a patient outside of your place of employment, however, a different standard applies. According to Joanne Sheehan, JD, RN, BSN, an attorney with Friedman, Newman, Levy, Sheehan and Carolan in Fairfield, CT, every state has Good Samaritan laws that protect healthcare providers from liability if they provide emergency care in good faith. Such care would include giving a man who had a heart attack nitroglycerin if he had it with him, for example. These laws have certain “gray” areas and vary slightly from state to state. So it is up to you to familiarize yourself with and understand those laws in your state.


    While we have all said that we would've given the kid the inhaler. It was her place of employment, and she would've been breaking the law and jeopardizing her license. (In the event of a kid struggling...license schmicense, but we don't know the full story)
  12. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from moreoreo
    Like others, I have to admit I would have allowed the student to use the inhaler if he was wheezing, or even if he simply c/o symptoms that warranted its use. Especially if I managed to get mom on the phone verifying that it was his inhaler. Especially if he had documentation on file for previous years allowing use of the same medication. It would be a lengthy visit note but I would rather stand up for why I violated a school policy than why I withheld medication from a child in distress. However, I do think the parent has to shoulder some blame in this situation. Yes, parents are busy and it's hard to get paperwork turned in on top of other busyness, but if the school has "known about his severe asthma since first grade," then she should also be aware of their policy by now. I am sure there is more to this story than the article reveals.
    This!
  13. by   CoffeeRTC
    [QUOTE=peacockblue;9579861]Totally off topic and don't want to be sassy but those of us who live here like to point out that Pittsburgh is spelled with an "h". We are quirky like that. ������[/QUOT

    I've been avoiding the news lately and haven't heard about this event. My first thought was, it probably was the Pittsburg in Kansas....the one without the "h"

    School nurse wanna be here~

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