parents won't pick up sick kid! - page 2

I have never had this happen before, and don't know what to do. The parents and both secondary contacts refuse to come get a sick child from school. They say that none of them can leave work. This... Read More

  1. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from nursekoll
    I have never had this happen before, and don't know what to do. The parents and both secondary contacts refuse to come get a sick child from school. They say that none of them can leave work. This child is 8 years old with a 103* fever. I told them they need to find someone to pick up the child, they say they have no one else to call. What else can I do?
    Tell them that if they refuse to pick up their sick child you will call department of children's service and report neglect. That's usually gets someone to come pretty quick.

    Hppy
  2. by   kidzcare
    Quote from hppygr8ful
    Tell them that if they refuse to pick up their sick child you will call department of children's service and report neglect. That's usually gets someone to come pretty quick.

    Hppy
    to maintain a good working relationship with families who we will likely be dealing with for years, this is seldom a first, second, or third line defense.
  3. by   Farawyn
    Quote from kidzcare
    to maintain a good working relationship with families who we will likely be dealing with for years, this is seldom a first, second, or third line defense.
    Nor is calling an ambulance for a fever.
  4. by   scuba nurse
    When this happens, I tell my social worker, and she talks to the parents and threatens with DCF and that usually takes care of the problem!

    I know not a popular option, but you have to do what you have to do. We can't have a sick child hanging around the office all day. And this is only in extreme cases.
  5. by   nursekoll
    Quote from moreoreo
    So nowadays, when a student has a fever and is symptomatic, I let the parent know upfront, if they say it will be a while, that I will call an ambulance if the fever continues to rise or the student's condition warrants it.
    Do you have a number that fever has to get to before calling EMS? Is that in your school policy?
  6. by   WineRN
    Quote from nursekoll
    Do you have a number that fever has to get to before calling EMS? Is that in your school policy?
    We have a few steps before EMS.

    We have a standing order for tylenol is the fever is over 101.0 and the parent will not be able to come for more than one hour.
    If after that hour mark has pasted and the student is become worse despite nursing interventions (med, rest and hydration), the parents are called again and told that they have 30 mins to get someone to the school or EMS will be called.

    Now that being said, I don't think any of the nurse's in my district has got to that point. Usually the tylenol helps and the little one falls asleep. Unfortunately my office isn't always the most quiet place in the school, so the quality of the rest isn't great.

    I have heard of other nurses using their SROs to go to the house if it is KNOWN the parents are home and just ignoring our calls.
  7. by   moreoreo
    Quote from nursekoll
    Do you have a number that fever has to get to before calling EMS? Is that in your school policy?
    In my district EMS calls are based on nurse judgment/assessment so there is not a specific number. I have seen plenty of fevers in my first year and have yet to call as parents have arrived before the need but have been told that I should if it gets to that point. Again, we do not have stock meds or a standing order so waiting indefinitely is not always feasible or safe.
  8. by   Farawyn
    Quote from scuba nurse
    When this happens, I tell my social worker, and she talks to the parents and threatens with DCF and that usually takes care of the problem!

    I know not a popular option, but you have to do what you have to do. We can't have a sick child hanging around the office all day. And this is only in extreme cases.
    Why can't you have a sick child in the nurse's office?
  9. by   Jen-Elizabeth
    Quote from moreoreo
    In my district EMS calls are based on nurse judgment/assessment so there is not a specific number. I have seen plenty of fevers in my first year and have yet to call as parents have arrived before the need but have been told that I should if it gets to that point. Again, we do not have stock meds or a standing order so waiting indefinitely is not always feasible or safe.
    I do have stock meds, but I prefer to take a parent first before medicating a child with a fever.

    But ditto to ambulance calls. It is nursing judgement at my school. I won't call unless the child's condition warrants it. It is no fun for child with a fever that can be managed at home to take an ambulance ride either.

    I work with the older students and if I'm not getting a response, I'll ask the student to whip out their cell phone and call/text parent/guardian with my permission. Suddenly folks are available!

    But I did have one poor sick kid one time. Student was high-functioning autistic and clearly not feeling well (temp over 100), causing a very large sensory overload. Parent - only contact I had - would not answer phone, texts, email, anything. It was not a good idea for this student to go home on the bus, so an admin drove to parent's home, rang the bell, and found parent was at home, not answering the phone.
  10. by   scuba nurse
    Quote from Farawyn
    Why can't you have a sick child in the nurse's office?
    No I can and i do. But we don't want it to be ALL day, (not a babysitting service) (if they can't come for like and hour or 2 , then OK) but not all day, I cannot have kid with a fever walk home or take the bus. If they are sick enough with a fever to go home, that is where they should be.
  11. by   Farawyn
    Quote from scuba nurse
    No I can and i do. But we don't want it to be ALL day, (not a babysitting service) (if they can't come for like and hour or 2 , then OK) but not all day, I cannot have kid with a fever walk home or take the bus. If they are sick enough with a fever to go home, that is where they should be.
    Yes. I agree.
    Sometimes I am a babysitting service.
  12. by   Amethya
    I only had one student with this issue, and took the whole day for his mom to get her. The mother came in later crying, saying sorry because she couldn't get off work. I got it and told her it's fine, but take the child to the doctor and don't bring him to school until his fever is gone completely, which she did but I felt horrible for the child and mother.
  13. by   Penelope_Pitstop
    This was me about 20 years ago - I was the sick kid. I hadn't been feeling well for a few days and my mom was convinced I was faking to get out of giving an oral presentation. (I love the woman, but she to this day guilts me over missing work for illness). Her go-to was "well, if you don't feel well, go to the nurse." Now, she knew full well that my social anxiety/chronic bashfulness meant that I wasn't going to the nurse. That would mean asking the teacher then talking to the nurse.
    So, I walked in to school and presented myself to the nurse before first period. I had a fever and she wanted to send me home. My mom consented to Tylenol but that was it. I trudged back to class, only to head back during third period. But there was an emergency with a special needs student and the office had to be cleared out. The nurse had noticed that I had been one of the students waiting and had me called down to her office. By this time it was fourth period. She called my mom *again* and my grandmother ended up picking me up. I'm really thankful that she advocated for me like that, although I guess I would have been okay for the rest of the day after that nonsense!

    Anyway, sorry to make this a tangential story but I wanted to share.

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