No, I'm Not a Beauty Shop! - page 6

I should probably preface this post with some facts.......It was 3pm, I had just about EVERY frequent flyer in my office, I hadn't eaten my lunch yet and I just sat down to eat when in walks one of... Read More

  1. Visit  mysixlittleones profile page
    2
    Wow! I had no idea this post would get so many replies. Thank you everyone. In hind sight it was technically a small request, but one of frequency and it came at a time where I had just had enough for the day. A PP hit the nail on the head when she said "if the little girl had manners". If this little came in and asked instead of demanded, I would have been happy to help as I do with a lot of other small not in my nursing description tasks. I have to have some boundaries, I found it very disrespectful on the teachers behalf as if HER time was more valuable than mine. I appreciate all the perspectives!
    Kim O'Therapy and Tina, RN like this.
  2. Visit  Flare profile page
    2
    for the record, i had a little one come in today with a stray earring right at my busy med time - she was promptly turned away.
    uthscsa2011 and Tina, RN like this.
  3. Visit  tictac profile page
    0
    I had this happen a couple weeks ago again and thought of this thread. I had the time, so I tried to help her. I did ask if her teacher tried, and she said yes, so I wasn't annoyed at the teacher. Unfortunately, I couldn't get it to go through the back, so it went home in a ziplock.
  4. Visit  ob-rnc profile page
    3
    Remember, it was the straw that broke the camel's back....not the whole bale. It is okay to go above and beyond, but it is also okay to draw boundary lines. The earring may have just been the final straw for that particular day...totally understand.
    tictac, NutmeggeRN, and Tina, RN like this.
  5. Visit  CherylRNBSN profile page
    0
    Quote from Nik3rn
    You have a set number of patients that are assigned to you but if a fellow nurse constantly called on you to do their task it would infringe
    on your boundaries and inhibit the care YOUR patients receive. The teacher can put the earring in. Let the nurse eat her lunch for once this week.
    This happens EVERY DAY. I work on a floor with LPN's who are not allowed to do IV pushes, hang blood, TPN, or start chemo.We each have 6 pts., but I must do those tasks. And the LPNs usu. leave work before I do, as a result.
    My girls have some male teachers.
    I doubt they would be comfortable inserting ear rings.
  6. Visit  uthscsa2011 profile page
    0
    Quote from morte
    If you are serious???? Boundaries, please!
    ^^^^ made me laugh out loud.
  7. Visit  Tina, RN profile page
    2
    Quote from CherylRNBSN
    This happens EVERY DAY. I work on a floor with LPN's who are not allowed to do IV pushes, hang blood, TPN, or start chemo.We each have 6 pts., but I must do those tasks. And the LPNs usu. leave work before I do, as a result.
    My girls have some male teachers.
    I doubt they would be comfortable inserting ear rings.

    But, an LPN may not be able to *legally* do a certain task, and that is fine. The LPN is not simply pushing it off on you to avoid it (hopefully). This is a weird comparison, IMO. I would never expect a teacher to give out my meds. And I would never expect to teach math to a classroom of students (although they'd probably let me if I asked- ha!) It is not illegal for a teacher to insert an earring or untie a knotted shoelace or tape broken eyeglasses together. They just choose not to, because it isn't their "job". And nobody questions it.

    And as I sit, getting the knots out of a shoelace, I watch the teachers all file down to the faculty room for lunch. Which I know I will certainly not be able to do, unless I am willing to deal with a million interruptions.IMO, this is in the same vein as your LPNs leaving on time, and you having to stay later.

    Both male and female teachers refuse to deal with earrings. Teachers refuse to do a lot of non-education related things. They can do this, and don't experience any backlash. We, however, are the "angels of mercy" and are expected to do anything and everything to make others happy. Even non-nursing things, even if it means no bathroom breaks or lunch breaks for us.

    Everyone needs to be flexible at work, clearly. I know I am like Gumby sometimes, I am so flexible! It would just be nice to see some reciprocation. I have been told numerous times at work, "Nobody here can do the things that you do as a nurse." I totally understand that. It's a big responsibility, and I have to take care of the whole school. A teacher has one classroom of students they are responsible for. I just wish that sometimes, they would take the initiative to solve some of these little problems themselves, before automatically saying, "Go to the nurse."

    Sorry, another rough week at work.

    PS: I, too, have helped little ones with homework while they wait to be picked up. Imagine I sent the child back to the classroom, instead, to ask the teacher that math question?? I'd look like an ogre! No, I am not a "teacher" but I do use common sense. That's all I ask of my coworkers: Common sense.
    Kim O'Therapy and wooh like this.
  8. Visit  nightie-night nurse profile page
    1
    Quote from Tina, RN
    That's all I ask of my coworkers: Common sense.
    I said that same thing to my principal last week when I came to her with a concern. Her reply was that it we could give people common sense or figure a way to teach it, we would be millionaires.

    Needless to say, that conversation with the principal did not resolve my concern and left me feeling dissatified with my job.
    Tina, RN likes this.
  9. Visit  kegreat profile page
    0
    DO you recommend any home health agencies. I am desperate to get my foot in the door! Thanks in advance!!
  10. Visit  Kim O'Therapy profile page
    0
    I can understand your frustration. I had to draw the line when a teacher sent a 5th grader to me because his nails were dirty. He wrote me a note asking me to clean and cut the student's nails. With the principal's permission, I sent an email out that afternoon and it has not happened again.
  11. Visit  Kim O'Therapy profile page
    0
    I agree. Under normal circumstances, I would probably help with the earring. However, under the circumstances described in the OP, I would have done what the OP did.
  12. Visit  Kim O'Therapy profile page
    0
    Just like any type of nursing, school nursing requires prioritization. Most days (99%), I would not have time to teach a child how to put in an earring. I've got diabetics and emergencies to take care of. Yes, there are moments where I can (an enjoy) helping with the "small stuff", but most days, no.
  13. Visit  Tina, RN profile page
    0
    Quote from Kim O'Therapy
    I can understand your frustration. I had to draw the line when a teacher sent a 5th grader to me because his nails were dirty. He wrote me a note asking me to clean and cut the student's nails. With the principal's permission, I sent an email out that afternoon and it has not happened again.
    Ugh, you have to be kidding me!! A fifth grader? He can clean his own nails, IMO. I'm glad you nipped that in the bud.

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