Munchausen on the increase? - page 3

It is my observation that many parents strongly advocate for their children to the point of excluding the rights of the rest of the students. I would love to hear from experienced school nurses if... Read More

  1. by   SchoolNurseTXstyle
    Quote from OldDude
    This is too on the rise. I get many more SS requests for records now than I did 10 years ago. I often wonder how this affects these kid's future when they graduate and seek careers or other employment and carry this "disabled" status with them? I wonder if it disqualifies them from some professions?
    Half the time I get these requests, I pull up their file and parents have written "no known health problems." I get a kick out of sending a copy of that.......
  2. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from OldDude
    This is too on the rise. I get many more SS requests for records now than I did 10 years ago. I often wonder how this affects these kid's future when they graduate and seek careers or other employment and carry this "disabled" status with them? I wonder if it disqualifies them from some professions?
    Or even (depending on the always-changing health care laws), disqualifies them from insurance coverage because everything they've added to the list is now a pre-existing condition.
  3. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from OldDude
    Facebook...for example, "Need prayers, at the emergency room with LD"
    1 like = 1 prayer
  4. by   WineRN
    Quote from FolksBtrippin
    I think it stems from this totally false idea we hold culturally, that if you do everything right as a parent, your kid will be perfect, or at least very well behaved. This causes parents to look for excuses instead of solutions.
    I think this is perfectly stated.
  5. by   NurseBeans
    Quote from OldDude
    I often wonder how this affects these kid's future when they graduate and seek careers or other employment and carry this "disabled" status with them? I wonder if it disqualifies them from some professions?
    We have run into this. The military sometimes asks for health records from the high school and suddenly, parents want all of the "parent reported" diagnoses removed. If we have no documentation of the diagnosis and parent says they "no longer have that" then we have no choice but to remove it.

    I get a kick out of telling a parent who had a doctor write all sorts of allergies on the physical form that now I need a doctor's note reversing it. "Why can't you just give my LD milk in the lunchline??!!!"

    Because in KN you insisted they were lactose intolerant. And some doctor wrote it down.
  6. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from NurseBeans
    I get a kick out of telling a parent who had a doctor write all sorts of allergies on the physical form that now I need a doctor's note reversing it. "Why can't you just give my LD milk in the lunchline??!!!"

    Because in KN you insisted they were lactose intolerant. And some doctor wrote it down.
    I have a parent who listed allergies to cherries, coconut, etc. Dislikes, not allergies.
  7. by   WineRN
    Quote from NurseBeans
    Because in KN you insisted they were lactose intolerant. And some doctor wrote it down.
    This is something I HATE dealing with.
    I feel like our MD/OD/NP/etc colleagues need to toughen up when it comes to ridiculous parent requests. I've received doctor's notes stating that "little bobby requires a 504 in place" or "little Suzy needs to learn in a carpet free environment which the school must provide". "Johnny can use his fidget spinner whenever he wants".
    And I have even received permission from the families to call and talk to these professionals about their rationale and usually what I get is off the record comments about how the PARENTS acted in the office.
  8. by   NurseBeans
    I can't believe I forgot this earlier, but I have a family with two kids who are allergic to Arby's roast beef. It's on the physical, signed by a physician. I couldn't just ignore that so I put it in our system, and a teacher was saying how ridiculous this was...I said yes I know, but IT WAS ON THE PHYSICAL so what can I do but put it in our allergy alert list? I told her to hold off on serving Arby's at the class parties. She just gave me a look and a snorty noise. DOnt even think there's an Arby's within 30 miles of here but still.

    I was thinking it was likely the horseradish sauce they had a reaction to but seriously, a doctor asked this mom about allergies, heard her say "Arby's roast beef", and put it in the physical?
  9. by   River Song, RN
    Quote from lifelearningrn
    The more things they can find wrong with their children, the higher the chance of getting a SSI check for them. It's sad, but I'm seeing this happen quite a bit.
    I got my first request for this last week. The kid has ADD and asthma, he's actually quite sweet despite his Mom constantly telling him he's not smart (she said this in FRONT of me!) and other negative self talk that I hear from him in my office every day.

    Working in NICU, I had lots of micropreemies where parents receive checks while the babies are still in the hospital. I would have parents that rarely visited, barely called but by golly they needed to get the SSI paperwork certified quickly Super sad
  10. by   catsmeow1972
    My cousin unfortunately grew up like this. If his mom spent half the time working an actual job as she did at convincing everyone the kid had problems worthy of an SSI check, they'd have lived quite comfortably. She did drink like a fish while pregnant so he has some effects of FAS but is otherwise not a bad guy. He struggled a little in school but not near to the extent she claimed. SS figured her out as he got older and she had to pay some money back. He's now married with a family of his own, works and does okay.....not bad for a kid SHE labeled as "retarded." Sometimes the system does work.
  11. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from SchoolNurseTXstyle
    I bet same kid has been at the mall with somebody drinking a hazelnut coffee in the vicinity. Did they sue the mall??? Did they even realize or care?
    This is a bit extreme, but I'll bite and play devil's advocate for a minute. (Don't shoot me!)

    I work at a peanut free school. We don't have a cafeteria and students eat in homerooms, so we went fully peanut and tree nut free. Made in facility with foods are okay for lunch, but not class-wide distribution for celebrations, etc. I had a student eat a peanut butter protein bar next to a student with a severe peanut allergy. I ended up having to use an epi-pen on that student with the severe peanut allergy.

    In the real world, the student would have just left the room, but teacher didn't allow it at the time as it was simply protocol for lunch and even student wasn't aware of airborne nature of allergy that became apparent. Since then, student's allergy plan was updated to reflect needing to leave room in allergen in place. And reminder went home to parents/staff/students about school being peanut free and that if a student did bring in peanut butter, we can go that student a peanut-free lunch easily if needed.

    Now parent was great about this! Parent is one that realizes she can't protect her child from everything, nor can I police the entire school all the time. But at the same time, the school environment is not one students can usually freely room/leave if needed. It is a balance and man, it sucks to manage it sometimes. I have students sneaking Reese's in the bathroom, for example.

    Of course, there are extreme parents. Many more of them than I wish there were.
  12. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    I have a parent who listed allergies to cherries, coconut, etc. Dislikes, not allergies.
    We now need a prescription from the MD and a very long form to be filled out for the "allergies"
  13. by   kidzcare
    Quote from Jen-Elizabeth
    I work at a peanut free school. We don't have a cafeteria and students eat in homerooms, so we went fully peanut and tree nut free. Made in facility with foods are okay for lunch, but not class-wide distribution for celebrations, etc. I had a student eat a peanut butter protein bar next to a student with a severe peanut allergy. I ended up having to use an epi-pen on that student with the severe peanut allergy.

    In the real world, the student would have just left the room, but teacher didn't allow it at the time as it was simply protocol for lunch and even student wasn't aware of airborne nature of allergy that became apparent. Since then, student's allergy plan was updated to reflect needing to leave room in allergen in place. And reminder went home to parents/staff/students about school being peanut free and that if a student did bring in peanut butter, we can go that student a peanut-free lunch easily if needed.

    Now parent was great about this! Parent is one that realizes she can't protect her child from everything, nor can I police the entire school all the time. But at the same time, the school environment is not one students can usually freely room/leave if needed. It is a balance and man, it sucks to manage it sometimes. I have students sneaking Reese's in the bathroom, for example.

    Of course, there are extreme parents. Many more of them than I wish there were.
    Then this falls on the teacher. If students are eating in the classroom, it is up to the teacher to be sure that students with allergies are not seated by students eating the allergen. I have also had to give an epi-pen to a child who was next to someone eating peanuts and I worry about that child's long term future in the real world. Going peanut/tree nut free gives a false sense of security to parents.

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