Med Schedule

  1. This is my first full year working at the school. The way the school has it set up is that the parents tell me what time to give their child med. I have found it to be a little crazy since I am leaving the office a lot throughout the day. I have to go to majority of the students because they do not want the kids to miss class time. The only students that come to me are JR/HS during their lunch hour. I do not mind going to the class, I like walking but I am away from the office too much. I am thinking about asking the head of school about having block time for parents to pick from. I was thinking either 9AM, 10:30AM, LS Lunch, US, Lunch, and 2PM or 10AM, LS Lunch, US Lunch, and 2PM.

    What does your med schedule look like? Any recommendations?
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  2. Visit MegWorth profile page

    About MegWorth

    Joined: Nov '16; Posts: 33; Likes: 33

    22 Comments

  3. by   grammy1
    We have to go by the time the doctor orders it to be given. ADHD AM med-given at home before school; lunchtime-student comes to me at lunchtime; we have 1 3pm med, again student comes to me. Meds ordered TID are given at home--before school, after school, bedtime; QID meds (rare) are usually given by me at lunchtime. All meds have to be in the original pharmacy bottle and the time is usually on there.
  4. by   Eleven011
    Most of my meds are morning and after lunch. Both times the students come to my office and they don't miss class time. There are a few afternoon meds, but I try to time them for between classes for high school, or at a recess time for elementary. I don't go to classrooms and deliver meds. And I go by what the bottle and dr. order says for meds as far as times.
  5. by   River Song, RN
    Our medication policy states that only medications that are required to be given during school hours are administered- a once a day morning med is given before schools, three times a day meds are before school, after school and bedtime. Basically unless it's a QID med or something with a specific time by the doctor ... i.e. Ritalin at noon, we don't give routine medications.

    I have made a few exceptions and do give some morning only ADHD meds for children who have non-compliant parents and these kids really need it to be successful. I don't however simply give medications for the parents' convenience. Other than that I just have some lunchtime ADHD or psych meds that kids pick up from me on their way to or from lunch.

    I would not be ok with leaving my office to administer medications routinely as I need to be available for emergencies and everything else that walks into my office. I sure don't want my asthmatic needing their albuterol for an attack to wait because I've left to give someone a medicine that they could have come to me for.

    I would work on adjusting admin times to avoid the student missing class, so beginning of day, lunch, on the way to or from recess or specials etc. You need to be in one location so make it work for you.
    Last edit by River Song, RN on Mar 22
  6. by   tining
    I'm curious, besides ADHD meds what are you giving routinely?
  7. by   ArryOtter
    We go by a Medication Authorization form signed by the doctor, cannot be strictly parent's word. Students travel to me so I don't walk all over campus with ritalin in my pockets. Most of my meds are morning and noon, but I have a few seizure and asthma meds scattered through out the morning.
  8. by   OhioBPH
    Ours have to be given within 30 mins of the ordered time, so my 11am meds can be given from 10:30-11:30. In this window I work with the student to figure out the best time. Ideally it will be during their lunch, but some students come between classes, so they will leave a class about 3 mins before the bell. I only go to a student in special circumstances and it is not routine. For example I had a kiddo very upset about being wheelchair bound for a while, and I went to him for 3 days. After that he had to come to me. I also would occasionally go to a student who was avoiding math class so that he would miss less class, but that was twice. Then I told him the importance of coming at the scheduled time.

    It is the policy of the department that meds should be given in the clinic when possible, so even in a lower school I would be calling for kids to be sent to me, not going to them.
  9. by   OldDude
    I'll accept "noon" or "each am" as a time designation but otherwise I require a note from the kid's MD with a specified time. Parents can some to school and administer the medicine any time they want to.
  10. by   AdobeRN
    I prefer and will request actual times on the prescription or a note from the physician - but sometimes the Rx's are not written that way. Between myself, teacher and parent we try to make the med times easy for the kids to remember with as little class interruption as possible but at the same time adhere to what the RX states. For example if RX is written to be given at noon but the kid will change classes or whatever at 11:45 - I will make admin time 11:45am (with parent permission) because it will be alittle easier for the student to remember and they are not having to stop 15 minutes into the next learning lesson.

    I have K-5 and for the most part everyone remembers to come see me. I do have a couple with severe issues that will never remember - so I go to them or if they are being pulled out of class for extra resource things the teacher will escort them to me.
  11. by   Flare
    most of my meds are given at noon - i have one given at 13:30. None are given outside of my office. If a parent comes with a forgotten dose of whatever I make them give it in my office and ask what they are giving. (if i happen to be in the main when they are there, i'll just have the student come down - point is it needs to be given in front of me)
  12. by   MegWorth
    I have to give 1 student a medication for a heart condition, a few take medication for depression and/or anxiety, and one student takes his inhaler every four hours (once at school).
  13. by   MegWorth
    I am really liking the way all of you handle your medication policy. The medication policy at my school doesn't require a doctor note stating exact times to give medications during the day. I do have one student med direction is to take 1 tablet by mouth at 11:30, this med is for a heart condition. All the others are QD, BID, or TID. I feel several of the parents do not want to deal with giving their child medication, so they have me give it to them when the arrive to school and a few minutes before leaving school.
  14. by   OldDude
    Quote from MegWorth
    I am really liking the way all of you handle your medication policy. The medication policy at my school doesn't require a doctor note stating exact times to give medications during the day. I do have one student med direction is to take 1 tablet by mouth at 11:30, this med is for a heart condition. All the others are QD, BID, or TID. I feel several of the parents do not want to deal with giving their child medication, so they have me give it to them when the arrive to school and a few minutes before leaving school.
    I get that too but I tell the parents, for instance, BID means every 12 hours, TID means every 8 hours. Many ADHD meds are written BID but meant to be given in the morning and at noon. So, you're within your nursing scope of practice to obtain clarification of actual times.

    I have one ADD med I have to give at 3:00 pm - AHHHHHHH! Drives me crazy.

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