Major Kiddo Accomplishment!

  1. One of the things I adore about being a school nurse is the wide variety of tasks we do daily. There is no such thing as a "typical" day!

    Today marks a MAJOR accomplishment for one of my more profoundly disabled kiddos!

    Background is failure to thrive, g-tube since infancy, low functioning, middle school age. We bolus feed TID at school, but student has clearance to take food & fluids by mouth... But they won't do it. Not only not used to flavor and texture, but also has an extreme gag reflex. So we've gotten as far as the tiniest nibbles on a fig Newton cookie, sucking the cheese off of Cheetos, and eating yogurt if it doesn't have any fruit pieces in it. Student also will not drink juice from a cup, only from the individual foil packs, because it doesn't look like water. So we have a lot of sensory issues going on. (Student has only been drinking from juice packs since Feb!)

    And today... Student drank a blueberry and cherry smoothie that was made in the classroom!!! Now by drank, that means took 4 small spoonfuls, but that alone is such a miracle! It was dark purple, strongly flavored, had minute chunks, and was thick. So far outside of their comfort zone.

    We weren't beyond bribery to get it done either. So of course the assistant principal walks in while the student is swiping through all of the pictures on my cell phone. Whatever it takes! I'm so proud of our team that educates and cares for this kiddo.
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   Farawyn
    You sound so excited and emotional about this. I love when "our" kiddos met some only imagined goal. Good for all of you!
  4. by   WineRN
    Super awesome accomplishment
  5. by   audreysmagic
    Ahhh, that's so awesome! When I did school nursing, I was primarily tied to the severe/profound disability classrooms, and I just reveled in their accomplishments! I know how GREAT it feels and you just want to scream to the heavens about it. <3

    The first one that always comes to mind with me was when a selectively verbal kid (he only talked when he felt like it, and almost NEVER in English) took a toy out of my hands as I was trying to show him how to work it and said, "ME DO IT!" - the first full sentence we'd heard him speak. I might have cried a little.
  6. by   Nurse in MT
    Quote from audreysmagic
    The first one that always comes to mind with me was when a selectively verbal kid (he only talked when he felt like it, and almost NEVER in English) took a toy out of my hands as I was trying to show him how to work it and said, "ME DO IT!" - the first full sentence we'd heard him speak. I might have cried a little.
    Such a great feeling!! I have had similar experiences with verbalization too. After praising the student, I always ask the paras "Did you hear THAT?!" LOL

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