Emergency Calls- How long do we wait? - page 3

We had this child with respiratory problems, and could not breathe. Under protocol, we call parents first and let them know what's going on. Mom didn't answer, so I called grandma. Grandma came, and... Read More

  1. by   Amethya
    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    Neither is she...
    But I'm the only medical aide here, so I'm the only one to do the assessments on this.
  2. by   Jolie
    In our district, the nurse's decision to call 911 is respected. A call to parents follows immediately. If the parents arrive before the child is transported by EMS, they can interveve and decline the transport, assuming responsibility themselves. Unless documentation is in place in advance, grandparents can't do that. Granny's job should have been to comfort & calm the child. If she wasn't doing that, I would have sent her out of the office so I could focus my attention on the child.
  3. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from Amethya
    But I'm the only medical aide here, so I'm the only one to do the assessments on this.
    You are in a unique position. Your school has decided to do the CMA route to save costs, apparently. It puts you, specifically, in a hard place as you have found by the need to hear condescending remarks and a justifiable knowledge deficit as you are not a nurse. This isn't your fault at all. I applaud your decision to come here and use us for a sounding board and resource. Your learning curve is not unlike the nurses on here. Stick with it and never hesitate to consult on here. You have always been upfront about your experience and certification here and it seems at your school. Keep up the good work, you seem to be doing what you should.
  4. by   Amethya
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    You are in a unique position. Your school has decided to do the CMA route to save costs, apparently. It puts you, specifically, in a hard place as you have found by the need to hear condescending remarks and a justifiable knowledge deficit as you are not a nurse. This isn't your fault at all. I applaud your decision to come here and use us for a sounding board and resource. Your learning curve is not unlike the nurses on here. Stick with it and never hesitate to consult on here. You have always been upfront about your experience and certification here and it seems at your school. Keep up the good work, you seem to be doing what you should.
    Thank you for that. I will keep doing what I'm suppose to be doing and hopefully things end up well here.
  5. by   grammy1
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    You are in a unique position. Your school has decided to do the CMA route to save costs, apparently. It puts you, specifically, in a hard place as you have found by the need to hear condescending remarks and a justifiable knowledge deficit as you are not a nurse. This isn't your fault at all. I applaud your decision to come here and use us for a sounding board and resource. Your learning curve is not unlike the nurses on here. Stick with it and never hesitate to consult on here. You have always been upfront about your experience and certification here and it seems at your school. Keep up the good work, you seem to be doing what you should.
    I agree, never hesitate to ask or vent here. The rude and condescending remarks have really irritated me. Some people just aren't nice.
  6. by   foggnm
    If there's an emergency you call 911, no waiting. If the child is blue, respiratory rate >40, poor cap refill, O2 sat <90 if available, etc. Follow the student's asthma plan. If the student is just tachypneac, having mild-moderate breathing difficulty but otherwise stable, then waiting for the parent is not a problem.
  7. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Amethya
    I think the same way, but stupid grandmother was like "Insurance this, insurance that." And would keep calling some random person and talking bad about me in front of me and I'm like, really? What I say, goes. So I'm thinking that I'm going to say this to the next safety committee meeting that I don't care what family says, if the child is having an emergency, I will call 911 then call parents.
    If that child had died, Tobacco Granny would have had no qualms talking bad about you on the witness stand. She would tell the press she begged you to call 911 while you callously stood there. You wouldn't be able to publicly clear yourself because of HIPAA.

    OK, that's a worst-case scenario. Policy or no policy, when you start to feel acutely uncomfortable about 911 not being called, you call them.
  8. by   TriciaJ
    And I agree with others, don't hesitate to come here with your concerns. There are always those who will chide you for your lack of compassion, or you must hate your job, etc etc. But hopefully you've found a lot of good expertise and support. We're here for you.
  9. by   traumaRUs
    Agree you are in a dicey situation - when in doubt and it sounds like this child was in extremis - call 911.
  10. by   NurseLife88
    My oldest son has asthma, that gets particularly bad in winter. I set up a personal protocol with his school nurse in order to prevent any confusion during an attack, or worse. I should mention that the first severe attack he had at school the nurse called 911 FIRST then informed me, she apologized so many times i can not count. I assured her she did her job and did it well. I would never want something horrible to happen to my child because someone felt as though they could not call 911. I would recommend speaking with your school board about putting personal plans in place for known students with asthma and another one for breathing difficulty with no diagnosed problems. But agree with many posters here, if a child can not speak then 911 should NEVER wait. Children can only compensate for so long and when they tank they usually tank fast.
    Last edit by NurseLife88 on Feb 16
  11. by   Tencat25
    Absolutely you did right by calling 911. In fact, if it had been me I would have called first, then dealt with fallout from granny, parents, etc. Our district has a call 911 first policy, THEN contact parent. I've had parents really mad a me for calling an ambulance, but my license is too important to worry about a parental hissy fit.
  12. by   WoosahRN
    OP, your gut instinct was right. Just call 911.

    I will share my horror stories. I'm in PICU. 100% of the kids I've had come in that were "found down" asthmatics did not survive. Once that airway shuts its hard to get them back in the field. All of them had CPR in the field. One coded in the back of her parents car as they drove around looking for a fire station. Every single family said "I didn't think they could die from asthma." They were all very haunting situations.
  13. by   3ringnursing
    Oh, dear Lord. God bless you and all school nurses. I would think your judgement trumps family members who may be thinking in terms of dollars & cents, and not what may be best for their little one based upon their own limited medical knowledge. The internet makes everyone a doctor these days.

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