504 for students with Chron's?

  1. Hi,

    Wondering if any of you have students with Chron's, and if so, do they have 504's? None of my students have a Chron's diagnosis, but if they did, I am sure we would make any accommodations for them. A friend with a child with Chron's is asking if it is typical for schools to fight/deny a 504 for a Chron's diagnosis. Curious what your experience has been.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   aprilmoss
    I can't vouch for Chrons, but we don't "fight" 504s for recognized disease that a doctor will certify, though, I'll ask if a simple accommodation can be made (like being more liberal with the bathroom access or whatever), would be easier than starting a whole 504 on the child.
  4. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    I do, and yes, they have a 504. I'm the one who suggested it and wrote it, actually, as I usually write all of our more medical 504 plans.

    A few major accommodations a student with Crohn's - easy and fast access to a private restroom if needed. In the 504 plan, for example, it is noted that student should not be penalized for needing to leave classroom suddenly to use the restroom and that student can ask for seating near the classroom exit for this. And "stop-the-clock" testing, so that student is not penalized for needing a break during testing. Also, make-up work plan for extended absences due to flare-up.

    This guide is awesome: http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.o...chersguide.pdf

    The 504 plan may be important for teens specifically - they can take some of these accommodations to college to get some things they may need, like a private restroom in a dorm.
  5. by   KKEGS
    We don't deny or fight 504s either for a legitimate diagnosed medical condition. I've seen 504s for all kinds of things including anxiety and allergies.
  6. by   NutmeggeRN
    Why would they fight it? A kid needs access to bathroom without question. Extended time for work makeup and flexible deadlines if they are out for an extended amount of time. Access to a more private toilet if possible. All of those can be done either with or without a 504 plan. I think they should have the plan.
  7. by   WineRN
    We had one for a student with Crohn's, and thankfully the parents were AWESOME and provided all lunches and snacks so the school cafeteria didn't have to provide anything for that child. And we don't allow food for class parties or birthdays, so the major accommodations were for bathroom use and teaching the kids in the class not to share food at lunch.
  8. by   BeckyESRN
    I always like to err on the side of having a 504 in place, even if the accommodations aren't necessarily needed at the moment. You just never know when those accommodations will become crucial and having that plan in place beforehand prevents a lot of headaches. Plus there is always that one teacher...
  9. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from JenTheSchoolRN
    I do, and yes, they have a 504. I'm the one who suggested it and wrote it, actually, as I usually write all of our more medical 504 plans.

    A few major accommodations a student with Crohn's - easy and fast access to a private restroom if needed. In the 504 plan, for example, it is noted that student should not be penalized for needing to leave classroom suddenly to use the restroom and that student can ask for seating near the classroom exit for this. And "stop-the-clock" testing, so that student is not penalized for needing a break during testing. Also, make-up work plan for extended absences due to flare-up.

    This guide is awesome: http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.o...chersguide.pdf

    The 504 plan may be important for teens specifically - they can take some of these accommodations to college to get some things they may need, like a private restroom in a dorm.
    ooh yes! Stop timed testing!!! I forgot that one.
  10. by   Farawyn
    2 students with crohn's, both with 504s.
  11. by   mmc51264
    I had the school system fight us on a 504 plan for a T1 diabetic. SMH. He ended up with an IEP once we had him tested because he had writing issues as well (OT sessions).
    Sometimes the school administration just likes to be contrary. Last year, the principal where my youngest goes (both sons have T1), wanted to write my child up for not following a direct order. They were trying to get him to drink a juice because his BG was 38 and he was very symptomatic. I think she was scared because she had never seen anything like this before. But that is not an excuse. The nurse happened to be there and was a mom of a T1 too so she knew how to treat, thank goodness.

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