Rhode Island College School of Nursing-- BSN Program - page 5

by RhodyGirl, RN

34,685 Unique Views | 130 Comments

i just wanted to start a thread for the ric bsn program. if anyone has questions on pre-req classes, admission, what the program is like.....this is the place to ask! the whole nursing school process can be overwhelming, so... Read More


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    Good points, Chris.

    I know that second degree students and transfer students are placed at the bottom of the "list" when the admissions committee decides on new nursing students. This is because RIC gives priority to students who started their freshman year at RIC as an intended nursing major. However, it is definitely possible to get in as a transfer or second-degree. Chris and I were both transfer students and are graduating from the program this year. Just keep your grades (very) high and work hard.
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    Quote from fetta818
    thanks! yes i am aware that i would have to devote all my time to studies if i did this. i guess that also rules out starting 340 next summer if they offer it (because i will be taking 223, 224 during spring 11). i want to graduate asap, but don't want to sacrifice the quality of my education...

    a couple more questions for you senior level nursing students at ric:
    have you ever (or do you know of anyone who has) had to put off a certain clinical for a semester because there was no space? i am very good friends with the person chris referred to. this is a rare situation, and luckily she is still graduating with us, since she was able to take the maternity course this summer.

    does nursing 223 take place on or off campus? for the first part of the semester, you'll be doing lots of classroom time and also lab time for practicing skills. there's a few hurdles to get over before you can go to clinical-- the fundamentals exam, dosage exam, injections test, etc.... then you'll go to clinical once a week in a nursing home for the last 6 or 8 weeks (can't remember exactly). you only get one patient, and do very basic care on them (i did do a few injections, an enema, and some oral meds).then there's a big paper for the clinical component- the gerontological assessment paper and careplans. there is also a drug profile assignment, among other things.

    would you recommend getting a pda or is it not necessary? waste of money, for the most part. i bought a pda and nursing software for it and have barely touched it. your reference books can answer all of your questions.


    i read about an honors program during senior year in the nursing student handbook, is anyone involved in that?
    is there anything i should buy before starting 220 and 222? (besides books - haha) i'm not involved in an honors project. between my internship and getting ready to knock out this last year of school, i can't even imagine adding something else to the plate. you could always ask your advisor for more information if you're interested, though. you should be all set for 220/222 with just the books. i have to be honest, 220 and 222 are very simple courses. you read the chapters and powerpoints, and then you take the exams. the courses get progressively more difficult after that first semester, so don't stress about 220/222.

    i just have so many questions and i am so nervous to start this fall so i am trying to prepare myself as much as possible.. so glad i found this site and thread! it's normal to be nervous, but try and relax a little. there's not much you can do to prepare, so enjoy your time off.



    also - what is on the teas test? i am taking it the 24th. think i'll be fine for math and english but i'm a little worried about what kind of science is on it..
    the teas is basic english and math, no science on it. it's used as an assessment tool for your learning. if you have low scores on the teas, your advisor will meet with you to assess what additional help you might need so that you can be successful in the program. good luck!
    fetta818 likes this.
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    Wow! Thank you both for the information. Extremely helpful. Can't wait to start classes!




    Quote from Jules777

    Out of curiosity...has anyone transfered to RIC-Nursing from out of state?
    I'm from CT and I have my undergrad in a non-health related field. I decided to go back to school for nursing and I'm about halfway through with my science pre-reqs...however I may need to move to RI due to my husband's work.
    I thought about transfering to RIC and wanted to know if anyone had any recommendations or thoughts...
    Thanks!
    I transferred to RIC after two years studying science at a private school in MA. My grades were pretty low at my old school (about a 2.8 or 2.9) and I was terrified that I wouldn't get into the program. I think the most important thing is to take your prereqs at RIC and get A's in the three classes they stress the most (Chem106, Anatomy, and Psych - Human Development). It takes about a year to get your prerequisites done before you can apply to the program.
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    Thanks for the info fetta818 and Chris....I'll contact the school for more info too. I really like the structure of the program from what I viewed on the RIC website.
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    I agree with Fetta818 on this one. Get really good grades in the Chem 105 & 106, Human Development and Bio 108 (Take it even if you don't have to, its easy and gives you a good GPA boost). I would suggest that if you took Anatomy, Physiology or Micro. or anything like that at your other school and got below a B- you should probably consider retaking it at RIC but get your Chem 105 & 106, Human Development and Bio 108 out of the way first and apply after you've done them. Every time you apply (if you meet the miniumum requirements) and you are deferred because there isn't enough space, it moves you further up the list for next time. Note that I said deferred and not denied because denial means that you haven't even met the minimum requirements and if you try to apply and get denied twice then you can't be allowed into the program. The point is, make sure that before you apply your GPA is above the minimum requirements (I think its a 2.7 right now but I haven't heard of anyone getting in without at least a 3.0 or above) and make sure that you have done the required pre-reqs before admission. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

    !Chris
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    Quote from cjcsoon2brn
    I agree with Fetta818 on this one. Get really good grades in the Chem 105 & 106, Human Development and Bio 108 (Take it even if you don't have to, its easy and gives you a good GPA boost). I would suggest that if you took Anatomy, Physiology or Micro. or anything like that at your other school and got below a B- you should probably consider retaking it at RIC but get your Chem 105 & 106, Human Development and Bio 108 out of the way first and apply after you've done them. Every time you apply (if you meet the miniumum requirements) and you are deferred because there isn't enough space, it moves you further up the list for next time. Note that I said deferred and not denied because denial means that you haven't even met the minimum requirements and if you try to apply and get denied twice then you can't be allowed into the program. The point is, make sure that before you apply your GPA is above the minimum requirements (I think its a 2.7 right now but I haven't heard of anyone getting in without at least a 3.0 or above) and make sure that you have done the required pre-reqs before admission. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

    !Chris
    Good post, just wanted to correct one thing you said: the thing about moving up the "list" next time, after you've been deferred, isn't true anymore. It used to be that way, though. You'd apply, get deferred because there was not enough space, and apply again with better chances. Now, they are strictly comparing you to the pool of applicants at that time.

    So, if you have a 3.2 and get rejected on your first application... you apply again... they don't take into account that you've already applied previously. Your GPA and prereq grades are compared to this new pool of applicants. The only reason I know this is because it's now printed on the newer school of nursing applications, and I've heard some of the faculty discussing it.
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    Quote from RhodyGirl-SN
    Good post, just wanted to correct one thing you said: the thing about moving up the "list" next time, after you've been deferred, isn't true anymore. It used to be that way, though. You'd apply, get deferred because there was not enough space, and apply again with better chances. Now, they are strictly comparing you to the pool of applicants at that time.

    So, if you have a 3.2 and get rejected on your first application... you apply again... they don't take into account that you've already applied previously. Your GPA and prereq grades are compared to this new pool of applicants. The only reason I know this is because it's now printed on the newer school of nursing applications, and I've heard some of the faculty discussing it.
    Ohh ok that's cool. I didn't get a chance to read the new nursing application form. I guess that's more of a fair way to choose applicants.

    !Chris
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    I posted a whie back and have been reading over the posts here. I've completed all my pre-reqs except chem 106 and have gotten an A- in everything else. My gpa is just under 3.7 and I swear all I think about is my gpa and getting in, whether it's good enough, etc. I am so nervous that I won't get in because of what I've heard about transfer students. It seems like I would have a good shot if I do well in 106, but I don't really know. Along with 106, I'll be taking core 1 and 2 this fall - so I'll be in for lots of studying and writing.
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    Quote from Nu_2_Nursing
    I posted a whie back and have been reading over the posts here. I've completed all my pre-reqs except chem 106 and have gotten an A- in everything else. My gpa is just under 3.7 and I swear all I think about is my gpa and getting in, whether it's good enough, etc. I am so nervous that I won't get in because of what I've heard about transfer students. It seems like I would have a good shot if I do well in 106, but I don't really know. Along with 106, I'll be taking core 1 and 2 this fall - so I'll be in for lots of studying and writing.
    If you have a 3.7 for a GPA and you get a good grade in Chem 106 I am sure you will get in without a problem. I was a transfer student and I had a 3.8 when I applied and got in on my first try, keep in mind the minimum is 2.7 but they really only take people with a 3.0 or above. I'm sure you will be just fine.

    !Chris
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    I agree, you seem like a good candidate. I don't see why you wouldn't get in. Good luck with your application!


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