Research Nurse Coordinator???

  1. 0
    What do you think this would entail?? Im curious......

    Curiosity is a good thing, right???

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  2. 22 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from CardioTrans
    What do you think this would entail?? Im curious......

    Curiosity is a good thing, right???
    This is my job title. It involves the coordination of clinical research studies. You see patients for study visits, obtain informed consent, conduct study procedures (could be anything from a survey to and EKG, blood draw, etc.), complete case report forms, prepare and submit study protocols to an Institutional Review Board. Basically you are the ringleader for everything involved in a study or (as most common, SEVERAL different studies!). Every so often you meet with a study monitor who comes to check you and your institution/department/docs out to be sure you are in compliance with FDA regulations.

    I really enjoy my job. It gives me a chance to get close to my patients and their families. You also get to be involved the "cutting edge" of new medications and treatments for patients who often have no choices left. The hours are great for me. I work days 9-5, no nights, weekends, holidays, or call.

    There are some downsides. Research means you follow some of the same patients for several months or years (some nurses dont like that). Also my patients have 24 hr access to me (pager).

    If you are very unlucky, you may also receive visits from an FDA inspector for either routine monitoring of a study or--worse, for "cause". We had a routine one last year and I can honestly say it was one of the most stressful experiences in my life. Mistakes or ANY suspicious/missing/inconsistent data can lead to anything from a slap on the wrist to jail time and fines for anyone involved. So Research, while an enjoyable job, comes with a lot of responsibilities that are tied up with ethical treatment of people and responsibility to uphold the federal and state laws.
  4. 0
    Are your studies grant based?

    I met a nurse that was doing interventional cardiology research, but she was having to find another job because the grant was almost up. I think that in itself would be stressful, knowing that when the grant ran out, you were out of a job.
  5. 0
    Quote from CardioTrans
    Are your studies grant based?

    I met a nurse that was doing interventional cardiology research, but she was having to find another job because the grant was almost up. I think that in itself would be stressful, knowing that when the grant ran out, you were out of a job.
    Our NIH studies are grant-based and federally funded. We do HIV studies so the money is always there. In the 10 year research history of our dept, we have never even been close to firing anyone over budget short-falls. We also do some pharmaceutical/industry sponsored studies for other infectious diseases/childhood vaccines.
  6. 0
    I've been reading about a master's program for clinical research administration. Have you thought about pursuing a masters in this specialty?
  7. 0
    Quote from BSNgrad2004
    I've been reading about a master's program for clinical research administration. Have you thought about pursuing a masters in this specialty?
    Hi, I have seen it too. Frankly, I really don't see the need for it right now. I am thinking of trying to become a Clinical Research Associate, a "monitor" who basically audits other research sites and involves frequent travel. The pay is outstanding. I can't justify spending money to back to school to for what is most certainly a low-paid position. My direct supervisor is Director of Research and only has a BSN. My last supervisor was a PA. I know they don't make that much money because we are in academia. Realistically, in the research world I don't see a need for such a specialized degree, unless you live somewhere that research opportunities are abundant. What it comes down to is experience--if you put someone who has this degree up against the vast majority of nurses who have research experience, the BSN will beat the Master's prepared nurse for the job.

    I spoke to an Associate's Degreed (RN) CRA (monitor) last week who told me she once made $102,000 a year working for one of the drug companies!! Recently she switched companies and took a pay cut (down to $85,000 a year) because she needed a job with less stress. It sounds good to me, and if I can get my foot in, I won't bother with going back to school.
  8. 0
    Since I work in diabetes/hypertension research, do you think it would be more relevant to get a masters in CNS rather than Research?
  9. 0
    I can't justify spending money to back to school to for what is most certainly a low-paid position. My direct supervisor is Director of Research and only has a BSN. My last supervisor was a PA. I know they don't make that much money because we are in academia. Realistically, in the research world I don't see a need for such a specialized degree, unless you live somewhere that research opportunities are abundant. What it comes down to is experience--if you put someone who has this degree up against the vast majority of nurses who have research experience, the BSN will beat the Master's prepared nurse for the job.
    I understand why an individual would not want to spend money going back to school only to be in a lower paying position when you come out. But why is education valued so little in nursing? I think that their should be higher educational standards in terms of who is hired into certain posts and it would bring up the public's opinions and respect for nursing in general. Experience is always more valuable than no experience but if we were more standardized in terms of which type of education is required for which job I think nursing as a profession would benefit in the long run. I think if nurses valued education for the sake of knowledge as well, and then aimed for a position that required their combination of education and past experience instead of just the position where they could make the most money maybe there would be more nurses satisfied with their careers.
  10. 0
    Quote from shouldhavebeenapoet
    I understand why an individual would not want to spend money going back to school only to be in a lower paying position when you come out. But why is education valued so little in nursing? I think that their should be higher educational standards in terms of who is hired into certain posts and it would bring up the public's opinions and respect for nursing in general. Experience is always more valuable than no experience but if we were more standardized in terms of which type of education is required for which job I think nursing as a profession would benefit in the long run. I think if nurses valued education for the sake of knowledge as well, and then aimed for a position that required their combination of education and past experience instead of just the position where they could make the most money maybe there would be more nurses satisfied with their careers.
    I agree with you, however, I was speaking of my own personal plans. I have three children, ages 12, 10 and 2, and my husband is currently finishing a college degree. Going back to school does not currently fit into my budget or my schedule, however, earning 80K definately would. This is my personal goal, but I understand that other nurses may want to achieve something different.

    Quote from BeachNurse
    I agree with you, however, I was speaking of my own personal plans. I have three children, ages 12, 10 and 2, and my husband is currently finishing a college degree. Going back to school does not currently fit into my budget or my schedule, however, earning 80K definately would. This is my personal goal, but I understand that other nurses may want to achieve something different.
    Let me also say that I am not only in nursing for the money, however, it has been my experience in talking to friends and colleagues that getting the degree is often expensive and sometimes doesn't lead to a better career or better pay. I have done the low paid, high demand jobs and it's just not where I want to be right now. I want to make the big bucks without slaving away at the bedside.
    Last edit by BeachNurse on Oct 25, '05 : Reason: Automerged Doublepost
  11. 0
    I can understand that you aren't interested in going back to school at this point in your life. I also agree that making $80,000 would be really nice. I am thinking of getting out of hospital nursing and have thought about pharmaceutical companies, but I don't want to be a sales rep or anything related to sales. What was your friend doing who was earning the big bucks? How do you plan to get your foot in the door?

    Sarah


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