Patient satisfaction RT nurse satisfaction

  1. Some of us have been discussing the recent 'customer service' buzzwords and the additions of customer satisfaction to the nurses' role. More than ever nurses are made responsible for improvements on the 'customer service surveys'.

    Our question was how to use this to nurses' benefit. Have studies been done linking nurse satisfaction to patient satisfaction? Would this kind of study be useful to our profession? Any input or advice from our research nurses among us?

    Thanks for your input and time.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   live4today
    Well.......where I work, a couple of nurses are picked to round on certain alert and oriented patients where they take a survey as to how well their treatment is or NOT....etc., etc. This just started, so depending on whether you made a good impression on the patient or not, you may have a counseling statement in order as I'm sure they do something with those reports they document patient satisfaction on.

    Why ask the nurses how their patients are treating them, or if they feel their services as a nurse are appreciated and worth them coming back shift after shift after shift. I mean....we're "just digits on a payroll that most hospitals seem to enjoy sending through the revolving door of their hospitals anyway just so they can cry to the public that they lack sufficient nursing staff. Well GEEEEEE....I wonder why!

    Then, their only solution to sending nurses flying out their doors is to recruit overseas. Boy would I love to be a fly on the walls of those recruiting sessions to see how our own Human Resources or Nurse Recruiters downplay the fact that thousands upon thousands of USA nurses were abused and that's why they are now overseas recruiting them to come save the day. Whatever!

    Yeah......it would be nice to read how your question gets addressed, mattsmom. I'll be watching!
  4. by   WashYaHands
    I'd have to do a literature review to find specific studies. I have a friend who is doing her graduate school thesis on this topic.

    I went to a conference last Friday that focused on Quality Patient Outcomes. One of the speakers was an administrator, one a surgeon. Their topic was a concept called "Inspirational Leadership" or "Higher Ground Leadership"

    Apparently, the facility that sponsored the conference is implementing this new concept into the workplace from the top of the organizational chart down. Lance Secretan developed the concept. The facility hired Mr. Secretan to consult with administrators regarding increasing patient satisfaction. The first thing Mr. Secretan did was go straight to the nurses to find out what would increase their job satisfaction. He listened to them and took steps to implement their needs overall in the hospital. Then he went to housekeeping, nutrition services, etc. When the administrators asked, "why are you addressing employee satisfaction when we need to improve patient satisfaction?" He replied, "You cant begin to increase patient satisfaction until your employees are valued and listened to. You have to take care of them first, the rest will follow". Here is what happened in that facility (from his web site, do a google search):

    "Centura Health, two years into their Higher Ground Leadership journey, has already achieved significant reductions in employee turnover - annualized turnover has dropped from 34% to 19%, saving the organization an estimated $135,000,000 this year over last, and the positive trend continues. Why? Higher Ground Leadership is the largest cultural transformation initiative in Centura's history, relationships among employees, patients, physicians, regulators and suppliers and treating them all as sacred beings, has contributed to dramatic increases in satisfaction and retention, resulting in a huge boost to the bottom line. Effective leaders literally "take care" of business, caring for and fostering the potential of their employees, which in turn results in positive outcomes for the organization.

    It sounds like a wonderful change to me. The challenge is that the cultural workplace change has to begin with administration. I hope this concept catches on.

    Lance Secretan has written a few books on the topic: Inspirational Leadership: Destiny, calling & Cause, and Reclaiming Higher Ground: Creating Organizations that inspire the soul.

    I know I didnt specifically answer your question, but I hope this information helps.

    Linda
  5. by   ainz
    People in the business of customer satisfaction have known the equation for success goes like this:

    satisfied employees = satisfied customers = success

    Doubt you will find anything on this in the nursing literature in terms of research, a quality study that is.

    On the business side, employees that have the most contact with customers have the greatest impact on the success of the business. If these employees are dissatisfied with their employer it shows through to the customer in the employee's comments, actions, attitude, willingness to do little extras that boost customer satisfaction. Nurses and members of the nursing department such as aides, have the most direct contact with patients and doctors so nurses are key to any hospital's customer service program. Problem is that most hospital administrations try to force it on the nurse and create a "do it or else" type situation which is destined for certain and absolute failure. Then administration walks around blaming the nurses for the failure of their program when actually it is the administration's lack of understanding of the principles that caused the failure.

    Quint Studer has also done a lot of work in this area and has a track record with data to show the results.
  6. by   altomga
    What a novel concept!! (with a little sarcasm in my voice..sorry)...it is so true though.....if the employees are happy and appreciated by the employer it will pass along in their work and interaction with "the customers".....
    Wouldn't it be nice if ALL EMPLOYERS realized this!!!
  7. by   mattsmom81
    Thank you so much for those references Linda and Ainz...I will followup, definitely. I have a few ears on my management team and will ask them to consider presenting this Higher Ground Leadership model to the CEO next administrative meeting. I will include Quint Studer's data to back it up.

    My facility's workers have very low morale and the 'do it or else' attitude definitely prevails. We could benefit from this novel approach....the entire facility AND our patients could benefit....I will attack from this angle and see if we can get anywhere.


    Thanks again guys for the good info!!
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Aug 6, '03
  8. by   live4today
    Originally posted by ainz
    People in the business of customer satisfaction have known the equation for success goes like this:

    satisfied employees = satisfied customers = success

    Doubt you will find anything on this in the nursing literature in terms of research, a quality study that is.

    On the business side, employees that have the most contact with customers have the greatest impact on the success of the business. If these employees are dissatisfied with their employer it shows through to the customer in the employee's comments, actions, attitude, willingness to do little extras that boost customer satisfaction. Nurses and members of the nursing department such as aides, have the most direct contact with patients and doctors so nurses are key to any hospital's customer service program. Problem is that most hospital administrations try to force it on the nurse and create a "do it or else" type situation which is destined for certain and absolute failure. Then administration walks around blaming the nurses for the failure of their program when actually it is the administration's lack of understanding of the principles that caused the failure.

    Quint Studer has also done a lot of work in this area and has a track record with data to show the results.
    I SECOND this comment! (applauding you ainz).

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