How to get into Research Nursing?

  1. Hello, everybody. I need help from my fellow nurses working in research!

    I am a telemetry nurse working a night shift in a very busy unit with a high turnover rate. To be frank, I didn't like floor nursing ever since I started working, but at this point I feel that my whole life is twisted around this position that takes away every breath of energy long before the beginning of my shift. Although I have my small victories, interesting assignments, good relationship with some of the workers, and an opportunity to learn new concepts, I softly saying do not enjoy this position. Although I had a number of opportunities to leave the position and work as a dialysis nurse, a school nurse, psyche nurse, or even transfer to a different unit, I staying on the floor hoping to change my attitude. Those highly specialized positioning didn't appeal me either. But as time goes by, my aversion and burnout grows stronger. It's been nine months since I worked here, and every night i battle myself to go to work and remain productive. I am also working on my BSN, and it will be about a year before I graduate.

    Just recently I have learned about research nursing, and upon closer look realized that this could be a good match for me. I enjoy working with people, meticulous, and in my opinion possess good clinical judgment. Dilemma: I don't have experience, and most of the positions I applied didn't consider me due to lack of that experience: back to new grad syndrome. Those of you who were able to get into the field, could you give me an advice to maximize my chances to be considered for a position?

    PS Those of you who live in IL. Perhaps, you are familiar with some of the research organizations that are open to hiring nurses aspiring to contribute to research?
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Been there,done that
    Let me google that for you.
    I understand your desire to move away from the bedside. I have been there, done that.

    There are many threads here on AN. Start there. Search job engines. You need to do your own (haha) research.

    Best of luck, let us know how it's going.
  4. by   OnOn2NICU
    Quote from nataliyaslmn
    Hello, everybody. I need help from my fellow nurses working in research!

    I am a telemetry nurse working a night shift in a very busy unit with a high turnover rate. To be frank, I didn't like floor nursing ever since I started working, but at this point I feel that my whole life is twisted around this position that takes away every breath of energy long before the beginning of my shift. Although I have my small victories, interesting assignments, good relationship with some of the workers, and an opportunity to learn new concepts, I softly saying do not enjoy this position. Although I had a number of opportunities to leave the position and work as a dialysis nurse, a school nurse, psyche nurse, or even transfer to a different unit, I staying on the floor hoping to change my attitude. Those highly specialized positioning didn't appeal me either. But as time goes by, my aversion and burnout grows stronger. It's been nine months since I worked here, and every night i battle myself to go to work and remain productive. I am also working on my BSN, and it will be about a year before I graduate.

    Just recently I have learned about research nursing, and upon closer look realized that this could be a good match for me. I enjoy working with people, meticulous, and in my opinion possess good clinical judgment. Dilemma: I don't have experience, and most of the positions I applied didn't consider me due to lack of that experience: back to new grad syndrome. Those of you who were able to get into the field, could you give me an advice to maximize my chances to be considered for a position?

    PS Those of you who live in IL. Perhaps, you are familiar with some of the research organizations that are open to hiring nurses aspiring to contribute to research?
    Check the medical universities and teaching hospitals. Also look up information on SOCRA training
  5. by   nataliyaslmn
    Thank you
  6. by   CrunchRN
    Super hard to get into research. And yet me and my ADN managed it and it has been difficult and wonderful
    You can do it, but you have to really be dedicated and hard working about it.
  7. by   KEC87_RN
    I graduated from my ADN program in spring 2014 and was able to land a Clinical Research Nurse position as my first "official" nursing job.

    It was difficult for me to land a hospital position (I live in Southern California, where it is oversaturated with new graduates trying to find work), and it took me over a year to finally find work. I never knew i could pursue research as a nurse in the first place until a friend of mine told me I could, especially because in addition to my RN, I also have a bachelor's degree in biological sciences (research-based). I could see myself doing this for a while.

    I second OnOn2RN's advice, to check out medical universities and teaching hospitals, as they are always conducting research. Also look up clinical research organizations and pharmaceutical companies in your area. Try to network as much as you can. Do you know anyone working in research who could refer you?

    Hope this helps.
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Moved to the Research Nursing forum for more replies.
  9. by   nataliyaslmn
    Thank you. Can I ask you whether they take nurses with ADN pursuing BSN. And the other question is whether salary comparable to bedside nursing?
  10. by   mdcp
    Salary is NOT comparable to bedside. Research nursing is a salaried position with a huge cut from bedside where u earn a hourly pay plus differentials. Work is completely different. Bedside nursing you will get paid more because you don't know what your schedule will be, you don't know when you will get a lunch or if you will get a lunch and you deal with patients and family's that are unhappy.... Oh and you clean up bed bound patients like every 30 mins.

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