Rehabilitation Nursing: A Specialty In Its Own Right - page 2

by TheCommuter 19,363 Views | 23 Comments Senior Moderator

Rehabilitation nursing is a fast-paced specialty that involves helping patients and their families deal with short-term, progressive, or long-term impediments and disabilities in ways that constructively facilitate the highest... Read More


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    Quote from juan de la cruz
    p.s. not to be nitpicky, but cpm actually stands for continuous passive motion. the cpm equipment provides passive rom.
    thanks for the correction and your insight!
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    I didn't know there was specific certification for Rehab nurses. I am working in a Rehab facility attached to LTC. I love it. I was going to look into the Gerontology specialty, but now have a new view. Thanks!!!!!
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    I am A CRRN who worked on a rehab unit and I was dismayed to find that the Hospital I worked at seemed to value the specialty of Rehab nursing less and less. In 1987, when I started there, we were a closed unit and no other nurses floated in or floated out. When Iowa health System took over our hospital in 1995' things began to change. We were floating out to other units and even worse' non-rehab nurses were floating in. Many of these nurses felt that rehab was beneath them and were not expected to do any of our rehab paperwork, such as FIMs scoring or to attend patient staffings. Most did not know proper transfer techniques and were used to their patients being in bed all day. In 2010 there were 3 CRRNs on the Rehab unit. Now there are none. In an effort to decrease payroll costs, they fired 2 of us last year. We both suspect that it was because we had been there many years and were both near the top of the pay scale. Our certifications seemed to have no value for management. It is sad that Hospitals are allowed to fire good nurses that have certifications and many years of experience, in order to hire new grads at a lower rate of pay, but as they reminded us, we were "at will employees". At present I am hunting for a job, but a 58 year old that has been fired is not seen as a good catch. I know whatever job I find will not pay near what I was making. DOES ANYONE VALUE REHAB CERTIFICATION? DOES ANYONE VALUE EXPERIENCE?
    Wise Woman RN likes this.
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    Quote from mmc51264
    I didn't know there was specific certification for Rehab nurses. I am working in a Rehab facility attached to LTC. I love it. I was going to look into the Gerontology specialty, but now have a new view. Thanks!!!!!
    Yes, the certification for rehab nurses (CRRN) definitely exists, and nurses at my workplace who have this certification receive a pay raise and are promoted to the level of 'CRRN.'
    LadyFree28 and mmc51264 like this.
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    Quote from BrendaCRRN
    DOES ANYONE VALUE REHAB CERTIFICATION? DOES ANYONE VALUE EXPERIENCE?
    My place of employment, a freestanding rehabilitation hospital, gives all CRRNs a pay raise and promotes them. In addition, nurses who have many years of experience receive a significantly higher rate of pay per the HR wage grid. So, to answer your question, some facilities still do value certification and experience.
    LadyFree28 and Wise Woman RN like this.
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    Quote from BrendaCRRN
    I am A CRRN who worked on a rehab unit and I was dismayed to find that the Hospital I worked at seemed to value the specialty of Rehab nursing less and less. In 1987, when I started there, we were a closed unit and no other nurses floated in or floated out. When Iowa health System took over our hospital in 1995' things began to change. We were floating out to other units and even worse' non-rehab nurses were floating in. Many of these nurses felt that rehab was beneath them and were not expected to do any of our rehab paperwork, such as FIMs scoring or to attend patient staffings. Most did not know proper transfer techniques and were used to their patients being in bed all day. In 2010 there were 3 CRRNs on the Rehab unit. Now there are none. In an effort to decrease payroll costs, they fired 2 of us last year. We both suspect that it was because we had been there many years and were both near the top of the pay scale. Our certifications seemed to have no value for management. It is sad that Hospitals are allowed to fire good nurses that have certifications and many years of experience, in order to hire new grads at a lower rate of pay, but as they reminded us, we were "at will employees". At present I am hunting for a job, but a 58 year old that has been fired is not seen as a good catch. I know whatever job I find will not pay near what I was making. DOES ANYONE VALUE REHAB CERTIFICATION? DOES ANYONE VALUE EXPERIENCE?
    The same thing is happening to the rehab unit I worked at for many years. The nurses and aides who float in don't want to be there, don't do the required charting, don't have the specialized knowledge.
    I was fired two weeks ago, and now, at my great age, I have no insurance, and am not quite able to get social security, and who will hire me?? I have been certified since 95, keep up with my CEUs, but I think the only place I will be able to work will be one of the stores that has "greeters." Sad and scary. Good luck to you in your search..
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    Quote from BrendaCRRN
    I am A CRRN who worked on a rehab unit and I was dismayed to find that the Hospital I worked at seemed to value the specialty of Rehab nursing less and less. In 1987, when I started there, we were a closed unit and no other nurses floated in or floated out. When Iowa health System took over our hospital in 1995' things began to change. We were floating out to other units and even worse' non-rehab nurses were floating in. Many of these nurses felt that rehab was beneath them and were not expected to do any of our rehab paperwork, such as FIMs scoring or to attend patient staffings. Most did not know proper transfer techniques and were used to their patients being in bed all day. In 2010 there were 3 CRRNs on the Rehab unit. Now there are none. In an effort to decrease payroll costs, they fired 2 of us last year. We both suspect that it was because we had been there many years and were both near the top of the pay scale. Our certifications seemed to have no value for management. It is sad that Hospitals are allowed to fire good nurses that have certifications and many years of experience, in order to hire new grads at a lower rate of pay, but as they reminded us, we were "at will employees". At present I am hunting for a job, but a 58 year old that has been fired is not seen as a good catch. I know whatever job I find will not pay near what I was making. DOES ANYONE VALUE REHAB CERTIFICATION? DOES ANYONE VALUE EXPERIENCE?
    <br>
    <br>
    Same thing happened to me. We were a closed unit, no floats, we did a good job with the patients.<br>
    It does seem like other nurses look down on us, they don't realize that we have to use every bit as much of our nursing expertise as they do, and perhaps more. I am a CRRN, have been for 15 years, and in an irf, you can get patients that slide down that slippery slope to being critical fast. I loved my job, though. The actual rehab nursing part, working with patients and families to achieve their goal of going home. It bothers me that some of the nurses in the other parts of the hospital don't seem to realize that rehab nurses are really excellent nurses, and we actually do care for the biophysical and psychosocial aspects of the patients.. Our unit got a new manager, and I am the first one that was fired. I'm 61,have been working in rehab for all 20 years of my career. We had started getting floats in, they didn't wan't to be there, so they would pass meds, and daily assessments, but no teaching, no answering lights, really, no giving the other nurses a hand.. then they would go to the manager and say how mean we were.. <br>
    so, I am getting unemployment, and I am going to download the form from EEOC and file an age discrimination suit. Lacking a joyful feeling is not a good reason to fire someone. And now I have no insurance. Cobra is so expensive, I will probably have to go live in a discarded washing machine box.<br>
    Or, with all of our experience, you could come over and we could start our own business.. what do you think??? The too much experience thing, it gets in the way when someone wants the nurse to ignore policy. the old bags know better,they don't go quietly into that good night.. Hey, you could probably go get my old job.. there's an opening now.. LOL nightime rambling. but it's all true.
    Last edit by Wise Woman RN on Oct 22, '12 : Reason: corrected the incoherencies
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    So are these same skills used on the rehab floor in the hospital?
  9. 2
    Quote from Nikkinism70s
    So are these same skills used on the rehab floor in the hospital?


    Rehab nursing happens in hospitals, freestanding hospitals, and LTC; the specialty has it's own criteria and skills that are transferrable.
    Nikkinism70s and TheCommuter like this.
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    Quote from Nikkinism70s
    So are these same skills used on the rehab floor in the hospital?
    Some acute care hospitals and teaching hospitals have acute rehab floors.

    Rehab units can also be found in freestanding acute rehab hospitals and in nursing homes. Generally, nursing home rehab is subacute.


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