Will ADN RNs eventually be "phased out"

  1. 0
    Hello everyone, I'm an 18yo male currently trying to decide what career path would be best for me. After researching quite a few careers in which 1-2 years programs are available such as nursing assistant, medical assistant, medical coding specialist, radiographer, and surgical technician, I have decided that Nursing would be my primary option. My main problem about the career is the concern of ADN RNs inability to find jobs because most employers are hiring BSNs. Is this true? The majority of my sources are colleges that might just be pressuring me into a BSN program for the money. To be honest I would be content with any entry level staff position available. I guess in a nutshell I'm concerned about the job outlook for ADN RNs in the near future. Any thoughts and comments will be extremely appreciated,
    Thank you.

    P.S. sorry for the long post lol and if it helps I live in the metro area of New York
  2. 9,423 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 15 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Quote from Natethegreat
    Hello everyone, I'm an 18yo male currently trying to decide what career path would be best for me. After researching quite a few careers in which 1-2 years programs are available such as nursing assistant, medical assistant, medical coding specialist, radiographer, and surgical technician, I have decided that Nursing would be my primary option. My main problem about the career is the concern of ADN RNs inability to find jobs because most employers are hiring BSNs. Is this true? The majority of my sources are colleges that might just be pressuring me into a BSN program for the money. To be honest I would be content with any entry level staff position available. I guess in a nutshell I'm concerned about the job outlook for ADN RNs in the near future. Any thoughts and comments will be extremely appreciated,
    Thank you.

    P.S. sorry for the long post lol and if it helps I live in the metro area of New York

    From what I have seen and all the nurses I know, most seem to be LPNs or ADNs. Most nurses don't seem to need to be BSN's. I am not even sure if they are paid more. The BSN's I do see are usually in admin anyway or heading toward MSN's.

    As far as ADN's being phased out the hospitals around here are already nipping at the heels of the students in our ADN program.
  5. 5
    In the near future ... there is no chance that ADN's will be phased out of entry level jobs if you are even the slightest bit flexible in what jobs you are willing to take. At the entry level, only very few places limit their hiring of entry level staff nurses to BSN's. In a few hospitals and in some intensive care units or specialty units, there will be some preference for BSN's -- but there are plenty of opportunities around that you should have several jobs to choose from unless you have no flexibility in what you would be willing to take.

    On the other hand ... you are only 18 years old and have a long career ahead of you to consider. It is very likely that in the future, you will be interested in some career advancement and need the BSN to progress beyond those entry level roles. It's not just management and educator roles that require a BSN or above, certain specialties (such as community health) and advanced clinical positions may also require (or strongly prefer a BSN or above). While no one knows what the future will bring for certain, the trend over the last 150 years has been to require more formal education for positions for positions involving the well-being of others and anything in an "advanced" or "leadership" category. It is unlikely that trend will reverse.

    If you choose to begin your career with an ADN, there is nothing wrong with that. For many people, that route makes sense because it is faster and less expensive. However, you need to be prepared for the fact that you will probably need to go back to school for a BSN (or something else) at some point if you want career mobility and advancement.

    You should look closely at all your options before you decide. Sometimes it is easier and financially better to "go for it all" from the beginning and get the BSN to start with. That's particularly true if your local ADN programs require a lot of prerequisite courses and/or have a waiting list which makes the program almost as long as getting a BSN. Some ADN programs are so long and so intense that the student is better of getting the BSN -- which might be at a slightly slower pace and allow for part time employment as you go to school, etc. There may also be more financial aid available at a BSN program -- and a more supportive atmosphere to help students through the program. Some ADN programs are quite "cut-throat."

    You have to look at the details of your local programs to decide which is best for you. Good luck with whatever you decide.
    Last edit by llg on Nov 16, '07
    linzz, VickyRN, santhony44, and 2 others like this.
  6. 3
    Over 70% of RNs in the USA are ADN RNs. (Read that on Dept of Labor site).

    My mil has been an RN since 1955 (not a typo). She says they have been talking about phasing out ADNs and LPNs since before then. It won't happen in your lifetime.
  7. 0
    Until the nursing shortage is resolved, ADNs will always have a job!!
    Anyway, you can always pursue a BSN after becoming an ADN if you feel like you're not getting the jobs you want because of limitations. I've only been a nurse about two years, but I haven't seen discrimination in hiring between ADNs vs BSNs.
    Good luck!
  8. 0
    I think you might be better off with a BSN if you want to go into a speciality like ICU, esp. considering your age. Not to say that a person with an ADN can't go into that, but it seems like I've seen more "BSN only" or "BSN preferred" for these type jobs.

    Just make sure that you study your butt off and do well in whichever program you choose. Anybody who tells you that grades don't matter is wrong, at least for your initial job. From what I've seen, the people in my nursing class who have excelled all got jobs in the competitive specialties they wanted. Meanwhile, people who haven't done quite as well (and maybe as a result don't have as good recommendations) seem to have trouble even setting up an interview. Hope that helps!
  9. 0
    I read about the proposed progression of the profession about 20 yrs ago. In black and white, in a text, it was stated that the goals were BSN professional entry, ASN "technical" nurse, remove LPN/LVN from the picture (paraphrasing as best I can). Like Hellllllo Nurse stated, these ideas and proposals were put out in the
    1950's. Look what year it is now. 2007. We still have LPN/LVNs. Programs for this job classification (which is supposed to be extinct), proliferate.

    Consider all your options. When you start college I recommend that you also take pre reqs for BSN programs if you go the ASN route. Time wise, many are finding that it is faster to get a BSN than to get into an ASN program because they are so crowded, competitive, and the waiting lists lengthen each year. You will do yourself a big favor, if at all possible, to get the BSN now. If you put it off, life circumstances may make it difficult to obtain or the criteria may change. You never know what's down the road. Better to prepare early.
  10. 3
    I think an 18-year-old should go for the BSN. It doesn't make sense, in my opinion, for someone who has 40 or even 50 years of work ahead of them to not do it. If you can go to school and not worry about working then just get it out of the way. Why should you have to go back to school and work at the same time after you get your ADN? I don't think there is anything wrong with doing it if you have to but you don't.

    Also the liberal arts credits that you get with your BSN will be transferable to another major if you want to get out of nursing completely in the future. I think its always best to give yourself the most options and you got youth on your side so take advantage of it.
    Last edit by Lovely_RN on Nov 23, '07
    VickyRN, santhony44, and llg like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from Falon
    I think an 18-year-old should go for the BSN. It doesn't make sense, in my opinion, for someone who has 40 or even 50 years of work ahead of them to not do it. If you can go to school and not worry about working then just get it out of the way. Why should you have to go back to school and work at the same time after you get your ADN? I don't think there is anything wrong with doing it if you have to but you don't.

    Also the liberal arts credits that you get with your BSN will be transferable to another major if you want to get out of nursing completely in the future. I think its always best to give yourself the most options and you got youth on your side so take advantage of it.
    I generally agree. If the OP were a family member or friend, I would be advising them get the "college experience" on campus and get a BSN from the beginning -- not only for all the reasons you and I have said, but also because I believe that living on campus at a university is a valuable life experience in and of itself.

    However, before some of you get offended .... I recognize that it is not the right choice for everybody.
    VickyRN likes this.
  12. 0
    ADN's won't be phased out. but you are young , i would go for the BSN if i was 18. good luck in schooling.. keep us updated.


Top