Will ADN RNs eventually be "phased out" - page 2

Hello everyone, I'm an 18yo male currently trying to decide what career path would be best for me. After researching quite a few careers in which 1-2 years programs are available such as nursing assistant, medical assistant,... Read More

  1. 1
    Definately NO. Even if they did, 9 times out of 10, the facility you work for would pay to put you through a bridgeover program just like they did with the LPNs.

    Here is the real low down on what you nead to be considering.

    1. Money: Because you get ADNs through 2 year colleges (and tutuion is cheaper at two year colleges than at four year colleges) it is usually much cheaper. If money is an issue, look in your area. Many hospitals, especially if they are affiliated with a nursing school, will pay for you to go back to school to get your BSN and MSN after you have worked there a certain time period.

    2. Time: ADNs are only theoretically two year programs. At most schools, you apply for the nursing program, and you get put on a wait list. You take prerequisite classes until you have a place in the actual nursing program. This can take one or two semesters depending on your grades and how many applicants there are. Once you enter the actual nursing program (ie. clinical rotations) you have two more years to go. At most schools, you are only able to finish in two years because of mandatory summer sessions. In other words, they are cramming 6 semesters into two years. At a four college, 6 semesters would be 3 years. So, by the time you finish your "two year" degree, most people have done 7 to 8 semesters, or the equivalent of four years, but you get "credit" for "two". In a four year school, you take your prerequisite classes for the first two years and the last two years are the clinical rotations. Sound familiar? ADNs are four year degrees compacted into 2 1/2 or three calendar years, not "semester years". This can make them even harder than four year schools, but can also make better nurses because it can weed out the weak and lazy. Most ADN programs start with 100+ in a class, but end up with less than 30. Check the school's NCLEX pass rates. Many times, ADN programs have higher pass rates.

    3. Nursing school patient care and being on your own on the floor are two WAY different things. It takes an adjustment period beyond even the new grad orientation. You have to learn how to do it on your own without a preceptor looking over your shoulder and keeping you on time. ADN programs focus on nursing practice. BSN programs focus on theory. In my experience, it is easier for ADNs to transition to the "real world". BSNs take longer to catch up, but do.

    4. ADNs in no way keep you from going to specialized nursing or even management, it just depends on your area and the hospital. Going straight into a specialized area is never recommend for a new grad anyway. Even if you are the validictorian of your school with a 8.0 GPA , you still need to get a solid Med/Surg foundation for at least 6 months to a year after initial new grad orientation. Due to the nursing shortage, you see more and more new grad internships to EDs or ICUs, but without a firm foundation in Med/Surg you will: 1. not have any experience off which to draw; 2. will not have found your "rhythm" as a nurse yet; 3. will probably be overwhelmed learning advanced practice teqhniques before you've mastered the fundamentals.

    And, my own personal hint for an easy tranition from school to practice: try to get your first job at the hospital where you did your clinicals. It will be a much easier transition if you are already familiar/ comfortable with that hospital's policies and equipment. Every hospital, even different hospitals within the same system, can have different policies and equipment. Every floor within a hospital may have it's own policies and procedures, so apply to floors you are familiar with and liked from clinical rotations.


    Me:
    ADN Degree
    RN III
    CMSRN
    6 years experience
    Duke University Hospital
    SarasotaRN2b likes this.

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  2. 3
    natethegreat,

    it is great to see a young man of 18 looking into nursing, as a career. we need more men in nursing!!

    regretfully, the shortage of nurses will keep the adn program alive. if you need to get your rn fast, then the adn is the way to go. if you want to be a professional rn, then you need the bsn.

    i know this sounds pompus, but we really do need to phase out the diploma and adn programs, before nursing will be recognized by other health care professions as a "true" profession, rather than a vocation. all other health care professionals are required to have a minimum of a bachelor's degree, and some even require a master's degree. why should nursing be allowed to call itself a profession, when we have 3 seperate entry levels into the field?

    i am a generic bsn graduate, then i obtain my msn (10 years after the bsn),then my phd (8 years after the msn).

    do the hospitals pay more? some do. you will need to check that out.

    you are young. i would go for the bsn. i believe that male rns really need to show that they have the advanced degrees. it helps move up the ladder. but remember, regardless of which program you graduate from, you will only be qualified to have a staff nurse position at the beginning. if you do go for the bsn, do not let anyone talk you into becoming the nurse manager, etc., until you have a minimum of 3 years of med/surg experience under your belt. if you do not wait, you are setting yourself up for disaster. look at the older nurses, take the good qualities from them, and adopt them to your practice.

    i wish you the best in your educational pursuits.
  3. 0
    I'm going to put my 2 cents in also. Here's the thing, most ADN programs take at least...4 years. 2 years to finish your prereqs, (because usually chem is a prereq for micro, and A & P I and II, at least here in california anyway). So then you get on the waitlist...then the program is 2 years...so minimum of 4 years. You go for your BSN..it takes..minimum of 4 years. Considering time wise, BSN is better
    There is tons of financial aid out there. There are a lot of good student loans which you don't pay back until you are done with nursing school! So I wouldn't even worry about the costs.
    Just my opinion from an LVN working on her BSN. : )
    Good luck!
  4. 0
    I echo the sentiments of the posters proceeding me that, no, ADNs will not be phased out in the near future. Even with the great percentage of nurses having ADNs, the nursing shortage is going to grow due to the aging population.

    I do think believe that young aspiring nurses like the OP should do the BSN...enjoy the process including college while you can! As a nontraditional student among many other nontrads pursuing nursing, the ADN pathway is the best way. One can do the prereqs on a part-time basis while either working and/or taking care of their families. The ADN provides us nontrads with the option to become an RN that if a BSN would be the only required degree will eliminate a very large pool of nurses. There are also now many options for those ADNs to get their BSN (many online programs are now offered) on their terms.

    So, no ADNs will probably not (if ever) be phased out for BSN entraints only...however, if you can go straight into a BSN from high school, do it.

    Kris
  5. 0
    One other advantage to the BSN. It gives you time to mature emotionally before assuming responsibility of a great magnitude.

    I would also encourage you to consider joining one of the reserve components of the military as a medic or Hospital Corpsman. These are great opportunities to learn technical and assessment skills. The experience can only help you as you go to school.

    (I don't forsee ADN's being phased out anytime soon. ND tried this and it caused a shortage of nurses. The BSN law was repealed as a result.)

    Best of luck as you start your journey!
  6. 1
    Quote from HM2Viking
    One other advantage to the BSN. It gives you time to mature emotionally before assuming responsibility of a great magnitude.

    I would also encourage you to consider joining one of the reserve components of the military as a medic or Hospital Corpsman. These are great opportunities to learn technical and assessment skills. The experience can only help you as you go to school.

    (I don't forsee ADN's being phased out anytime soon. ND tried this and it caused a shortage of nurses. The BSN law was repealed as a result.)

    Best of luck as you start your journey!
    It is GREAT to see a Hospital Corpsman Second Class in this forum. I too was a HM2, prior to receiving my commission as a Nurse Corps Officer.

    Wish you the best
    HM2VikingRN likes this.


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