Why is it called "RN to BSN" - not "ADN to BSN"?

  1. 1
    A friend of mine just told me he assumed no RNs had Bachelor's degrees - because he sees so many advertisements for "RN to BSN" programs. I had to explain to him that those "bridge" programs are for people with Associate Degrees in Nursing, who passed NCLEX and work as RNs but want to pursue a Bachelor's. This seems to confuse anyone who is not in nursing or health care, and frankly, as a BSN, I find it annoying. Semantics are everything - and these programs should be referred to as "ADN to BSN." The phrasing "RN to BSN program" DOES give the impression that those with RN licenses do NOT have a BSN. I NO LIKE!
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 28 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    "ADN to BSN" leaves out diploma nurses. They could say, "BSN completion," but it uses more space.

    The non-nursing public is confused by a lot of nursing terminology. You could practice shaking your head in utter frustration and saying, "Arrgghh! You just don't understand."
    anie10 and nursel56 like this.
  5. 3
    My BSN completion program required me to have an RN license.
  6. 0
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    My BSN completion program required me to have an RN license.
    For this reason. I have not seen any program info pages that have not indicated that an RN license is necessary.
  7. 0
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    My BSN completion program required me to have an RN license.
    This. You cannot just had a diploma, you have to have an RN license, traditionally, at least. My ADN program has an early acceptance agreement with an RN-BSN program immediately after graduation, but that isn't the norm.
  8. 0
    Yeah, I know you have to have an RN license to practice - regardless of if you earned a diploma, ADN or BSN. I get that.

    That's not what I'm getting at. It's that much of the general public might get the impression that "RN to BSN!" advertisements convey the message, or infer, that ALL people with RN licenses DO NOT HAVE BSNs, therefore they need one. I just wish the terminology was presented a little more clearly; "Diploma/ADN to BSN" would be more accurate and appropriate. Again, I believe semantics are very important. Of course the public finds all of this confusing, but I'm saying; maybe they wouldn't if things like this were worded more accurately!
  9. 8
    Quote from mclennan
    yeah, i know you have to have an rn license to practice - regardless of if you earned a diploma, adn or bsn. i get that.

    that's not what i'm getting at. it's that much of the general public might get the impression that "rn to bsn!" advertisements convey the message, or infer, that all people with rn licenses do not have bsns, therefore they need one. i just wish the terminology was presented a little more clearly; "diploma/adn to bsn" would be more accurate and appropriate. again, i believe semantics are very important. of course the public finds all of this confusing, but i'm saying; maybe they wouldn't if things like this were worded more accurately!
    no, i think you're missing the point of the previous posts.

    it doesn't make sense to say adn/diploma to bsn because just having a adn degree does not make you eligible for a bridge to bsn program. just graduating from a diploma program does not make you eligible for a bsn bridge program. you have to pass the nclex and obtain an rn license in order to be eligible for a program. the prerequisite for the program is not diploma or adn. the prerequisite is being an rn- regardless of what degree you hold.

    for that reason, rn to bsn is the correct term. diploma/adn to bsn implies that anyone with a diploma or associates degree can enter the program. that's not true. only those who hold an rn license can enter the program.

    i don't understand your statement that i put in bold. all people with rn licenses do not have bsn's. that's not a misconception, that's the truth. i'm not sure why rn to bsn would imply that you need a bsn to be an rn, because clearly you must already have an rn license to be pursuing the program.

    as far as what's more confusing to the general public, i disagree that diploma/adn to bsn is more specific. almost everyone in the general public knows what an rn is. far fewer will know what a diploma program is (high school diploma?) or what adn stands for.
    ahmad nurse, EMTtoRNinVA, tanyar216, and 5 others like this.
  10. 4
    What I find interesting is that people, even the PhD in Pharmacology who lives across the street from me, don't know that all RN's, regardless of what other kind of alphabet soup they have behind their names, take the same licensing exam.
    anie10, Szasz_is_Right, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
  11. 0
    I see what you're saying, Ashley. But here's how the conversation went:

    "RN to BSN! Wait, you're an RN, right?"

    "Right."

    "But you don't have a BSN, though."

    "No, I do."

    "Then why the need for these programs for RNs to become BSNs? I thought you had to have a BSN to even become an RN."

    "Getting a diploma, the ADN or a BSN all qualify a person to sit for the same RN exam."

    "Ohhhh. These ads make it seem like ALL RNs LACK a BSN and need to get one. That made me think that everyone with "RN" after their name must need a BSN."

    Just to clarify I wasn't crazy, I asked another person about this tonight, and they agreed, the wording implies all "RNs" lack "BSNs" and must get one. In fact, she was surprised RNs had 4-year degrees at all! Shows you how confusing to non-medical people all this is. Yikes.
  12. 10
    Quote from mclennan
    Yeah, I know you have to have an RN license to practice - regardless of if you earned a diploma, ADN or BSN. I get that.

    That's not what I'm getting at. It's that much of the general public might get the impression that "RN to BSN!" advertisements convey the message, or infer, that ALL people with RN licenses DO NOT HAVE BSNs, therefore they need one. I just wish the terminology was presented a little more clearly; "Diploma/ADN to BSN" would be more accurate and appropriate. Again, I believe semantics are very important. Of course the public finds all of this confusing, but I'm saying; maybe they wouldn't if things like this were worded more accurately!
    I am missing why I give a rat's patootie what the "public" thinks about nursing education programs?
    anie10, nursel56, rn/writer, and 7 others like this.


Top