Which would be better? ADN or BSN?

  1. 1 Hi, I'm currently in high school and thinking about getting into nursing after I graduate. I can't decide if I should go straight to the University and get my BSN, or if I should go to a community college and get my ADN, and then do an RN to BSN program at the university? Which would be better/ quicker?
    Thank you!
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  3. Visit  Reckless96} profile page

    About Reckless96

    Joined Aug '12; Posts: 5; Likes: 3.

    23 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  classicdame} profile page
    4
    Better depends on so many factors. The ADN route is definitely quicker. In the long run it may be more expensive to get your ADN then work, then try to take classes for the BSN. If you can possible afford it, I recommend the BSN. It is generally about a year longer, because both degrees require some of the same pre-requisites. Depending on where you live, many facilities are requiring BSN as the entry level for new nurses, so the writing is on the wall.
    azhiker96, loriangel14, Pixiesmom, and 1 other like this.
  5. Visit  knkids} profile page
    1
    In my area most experienced floor nurses seem to feel that new grad ADNs have more clinical experience and are better prepared to hit the floor running. I do see many job posting these days saying "BSN preferred" but it really doesn't seem to be making a difference yet in the hiring process. There are many legit on-line bridge programs these days. I would, however, recommend getting some sort of clinical experience under your belt while in college so that when you graduate you have that on your resume, such as medical assistant or even volunteering.
    spectrabrite likes this.
  6. Visit  IdianaCNA1993} profile page
    1
    well I myself am going for the ADN at my comunity college only to save money when Im done I am taking my bords and finding a job as an RN, to gain experience so hopfully it will be easier to get a job in a hospital when I obtain my BSN and take the bords, then going strait over to the university and working on my BSN. its going to take me about 5-6 years to do it that way but it will be cheaper and Ill meet alot of new people! I would also recoment getting your CNA between high school and college to make sure its somthing that you right down want to do. It will also teach you the basic care of nursing and get you prepared to see what its all like
    Oldest&Ugliest likes this.
  7. Visit  ittybittynurse} profile page
    1
    Many hospitals aren't hiring ADN anymore. Go with BSN.
    I know of nurses with experience and have an ADN, and are going back to get BSN, they have kids now, and work full time and go to school full time, its more challenging. Just get it out of the way

    BSN!
    loriangel14 likes this.
  8. Visit  tweetRN} profile page
    1
    I agree that it seems like ADNs seen to have more clinical experience than BSNs. That's actually why I chose to do my ADN even though I was accepted to a BSN school as well. my nurse friends told me that the feel like the ADNs are more prepared clinically. And I do feel the same way now that I'm out of school and working on the floor and not only work with other ADNS but also the students. Seemslike the only time I see BSN students is when they are following mgt for their last semester while ADNs we see weekly. Doing your ADN is a LOT cheaper too even if you calculate in doing you BSN after. When you bridge over there usually are only a couple classes you are lacking as far as prerequisites go and then the only difference is the BSN program you get management classes. For me it turned it to be a whole year quicker doing ADN then bridging over to BSN. When I bridged I could do the entire program online or go to class one day a week for 2 semesters. However like someone else mentioned, many hospitals are striving to be known as "magnet" hospitals which require them to have a high percentage of RNs be BSNs so they usually hire few ADNs if at all. Some will hire you if you express that you plan on doing you BSN or if you are already in a bridge to BSN program. Before you decide you might check around your area and see if they hire ADN our if they require BSNs. You can do that by calling the hospitals and asking to soak with the nurse recruiter. Good luck!
    Last edit by tweetRN on Sep 21, '12 : Reason: typos
    mimi74 likes this.
  9. Visit  artsmom} profile page
    1
    At your age- BSN. You will need it anyways. AD may be quicker, but it is a longer road when you want to go further, and in this field, most people like to go further.
    NutmeggeRN likes this.
  10. Visit  VeggieBSN} profile page
    2
    Definitely go for BSN, your young and have the time for it. Plus most hospitals are now leaning towards hiring BSNs only.
    NutmeggeRN and loriangel14 like this.
  11. Visit  sunrae0110} profile page
    0
    Do you ever plan to go further with your career than just having an RN license? I say BSN all the way. ADN is just a waste of time and is going to double the work you have to do if you do plan on doing anything more with your career down the road. Plus, many places pay more for a nurse with a BSN than for an ADN. I know the hospital I work (a VA hospital) at is no longer hiring ADN nurses, only BSN. There's no right choice, however, I feel that the BSN will allow for more choices in the future.
  12. Visit  adnrnstudent} profile page
    2
    If you were 35, I'd say something different, but at your age, go BSN to a state school. I wouldn't pay for private. If you can't get into state school, then I would do ADN and immediately do RN-BSN.
    PMFB-RN and soxgirl2008 like this.
  13. Visit  RNBritt} profile page
    0
    I would definitely recommend the BSN. In my area, many of the hospitals are "Magnet" status, which requires they have a certain number of BSN nurses. My mom, who has her ADN and over 15 years experience, faced some issues when trying to find a new job, and many of the positions were requiring that she commit to getting her BSN as a contingency for hiring her. If you have the option to do BSN or ADN, I would recommend the BSN.
    Last edit by RNBritt on Sep 21, '12 : Reason: typo
  14. Visit  soxgirl2008} profile page
    2
    Quote from sunrae0110
    Do you ever plan to go further with your career than just having an RN license? I say BSN all the way. ADN is just a waste of time and is going to double the work you have to do if you do plan on doing anything more with your career down the road. Plus, many places pay more for a nurse with a BSN than for an ADN. I know the hospital I work (a VA hospital) at is no longer hiring ADN nurses, only BSN. There's no right choice, however, I feel that the BSN will allow for more choices in the future.
    I would definitely not say that an ADN is a "waste of time" Where I live many of the hospital RNs are ADNs and around here you don't get paid any less than a BSN nurse. Some of these RNs are being reimbursed for their RN-BSN. I would hardly call that a "waste of time". Yes, it is better to go with the BSN right away, but people in ADN programs work hard for their degree and still get hired in many places. Just because the degree may put you at a disadvantage in some areas does not make it a complete waste across the board.

    Anyway....I agree with the above poster. If you can get into a state school go with the BSN. You're young and have time for it. Make sure you keep your grades top notch though, because around here at least all the state university BSN programs are EXTREMELY competitive....and it is often impossible to get in with anything less than a 3.5 GPA. The private BSN programs here are easily $80,000 for the whole 4 years, and a lot of them don't have the greatest of reputations. Research your area though and see what people say about the schools. Doing the BSN right away will save you less hassle in the long run, and depending on where you live it will be easier to get a job with a BSN. If I had to do it all over I would've done the BSN right away, but my first year of college I messed up my grades pretty bad and I have no chance at getting into the state university programs and the private programs are wayyyy out of my budget so I went the ADN route, and when I graduate I'll only need 4-5 classes for my BSN because I already have all the pre-reqs for the BSN program done. I go to a good ADN program, and around here they still hire ADN nurses, but if I could do it over I would have just done the BSN right away.

    Many ADN programs have super long waiting lists too, and it isn't always quicker. The ADN programs around here still require about a year of pre-reqs, and there is a 3 year waiting list...so it's not any quicker than doing a BSN program straight through.
    BDavisRN and samadams8 like this.
  15. Visit  chiromed0} profile page
    1
    After having gotten an ASN I would suggest at your age do not go for short cuts. Get the traditional BSN and get as much clinical experience as you can. You have time and it will save you from the problems I'm seeing in that experience matters and a BSN just eliminates the question of whether you have enough education. Otherwise, someone else applying for the same position WILL have a BSN and your application will have some concerns. Might as well just eliminate that problem now.
    samadams8 likes this.


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