Where does the new Associate Degree RN fit in?

  1. 0 [FONT=microsoft sans serif]The hospitals snub their noses at us because we don't have a BSN, leaving us no other alternative than to work at long-term care facilities, where most LPN's are employed. The long-term care facility staff are resentful towards us because we are taking the jobs that would normally be given to LPNs or immigrant RNs. Where do we belong?
  2. Visit  marthabaez profile page

    About marthabaez

    Joined Jun '12; Posts: 1.

    17 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  JZ_RN profile page
    2
    We fit in a van down by the river or a cardboard box because there are no decent jobs for us. I am happy I finally found something besides LTC (which I was miserable in because of the overwork and understaffing plus rude doctors) but it took over a year.
    dorkiexcici and kabfighter like this.
  4. Visit  frankie,RN profile page
    0
    Quote from marthabaez
    The hospitals snub their noses at us because we don’t have a BSN, leaving us no other alternative than to work at long-term care facilities, where most LPN’s are employed. The long-term care facility staff are resentful towards us because we are taking the jobs that would normally be given to LPNs or immigrant RNs. Where do we belong?
    I love this! You must've worked in a Philly LTCF. But seriously, we have no choice but to get that BSN. Got my RN in march, started on BSN in may. Trust me there's not too much in the city w/o the bachelors. Good luck to you.
  5. Visit  minnymi profile page
    1
    funny....you see threads where people swear there is no difference in getting a bsn or adn and that getting a bsn is practically worthless...

    then you see threads like this.

    things that make you go HMMMMM
    koi310 likes this.
  6. Visit  frankie,RN profile page
    0
    i think its all based on region. im in the northeast (PA) and the market here sucks for the ADN. maybe if i moved down south or out west, i would have alot more prospects. people should maybe state their region before assuming that its all good. in philly, its not all milk and honey. one or the other, but not both.
  7. Visit  funky monkey profile page
    1
    Get your BSN. It is the future in nursing.
    lindarn likes this.
  8. Visit  kabfighter profile page
    3
    Quote from JZ_RN
    We fit in a van down by the river or a cardboard box because there are no decent jobs for us. I am happy I finally found something besides LTC (which I was miserable in because of the overwork and understaffing plus rude doctors) but it took over a year.
    Well la-dee-frickin-da! We got ourselves a nurse here! From what I've heard, you're using your med-surg book not for writin', but for ROLLIN' DOOBIES!

    Livin' In A Van Down By The River - Matt Foley Motivational Speaker - His Full Scene - YouTube

    New ASN grad here. Graduated in May, passed the NCLEX June 14th, started working as an RN on Monday on a med-surg floor. It seems like most of the hospital nurses 'round my parts have associate degrees. I don't think most places give a hoot, with the exception of the bigger university-affiliated hospital in the more populated area of the state. Some places say 'BSN preferred', but there aren't a lot of BSN programs in the state.

    Whoops-a-daisy!
  9. Visit  applewhitern profile page
    0
    We still hire ADN prepared RN's. As a matter of fact, precious few of us here have our BSN. My DON is an ADN, and so are all of our supervisors. I'm not saying that is a good thing~ get all the education you can afford~ but I wouldn't go into great debt for it. Most hospitals here only pay 50 cents per hour more for the BSN. The trend in my area is to have a "certification" in a particular area.
  10. Visit  kcmylorn profile page
    1
    Not too impressed with all the BSN only hospital university hospitals. I too worked in the major philly university hospital that started Philly on the 'BSN only" craze. Their Dean of nursing wrote umpteen aricles to get her point pushed for her expensive university. The BSN's sat at the desk, knew very little about hands on basic nursing skills. Spent very little time with the patients- the aids were the ones in and out of those rooms . Was more impressed with the little poor inner city hospital's diploma nurses across town- more knowlegable( on tangible, practical nursing.) less reliance on fancy bells and whistle equipement- just their own nursing assessment and observation skills. The snobbish university hospital could expound mounds on the status global health care in 3rd world countries. Not very useful in the USA.
    applewhitern likes this.
  11. Visit  cute.as.a.callbutton profile page
    2
    We have 2 nursing schools in my area, one a ADN the other a BSN. The ADN program is harder to get in to, has a tougher grading scale, more clinical time, and a better pass rate on the state boards. People that don't get in to the ADN program or pass it, then take a crack at the BSN. I've heard multiple nurse managers state that they would rather hire an ADN from our school than the BSN from the other. I've never had an issue with my "lesser" degree because my school has an awesome reputation, and that mirrors the truth that sometimes it's not what you know but who you know when it comes to getting a job. And my schools name on my resume is a great "referral".
    EMTtoRNinVA and applewhitern like this.
  12. Visit  CherylRNBSN profile page
    1
    I have been LPN, ADN, and BSN.

    I am currently searching for job, and was told outright "We are looking to hire BSNs" This is an academic, magnet hospital. (In Louisiana).

    So where do you belong? If you are looking for long term job security or advancement, the answer is "in school". And if you can only afford one class at a time, that is fine.

    I see a big push for this now. It may change as baby boomers retire/economy improves, but for now, I would advise pursuing BSN if at all possible, no matter how slowly.

    And the extra education WILL make you a better, more well rounded nurse.
    sherri12 likes this.
  13. Visit  mitral profile page
    0
    In Our area everything is BSN preferred, and anything but the basic med surg type floors won't hire an ADN new grad. I've looked at hospice, clinical, er, or, pacu, home health, research, L&d, and peds, and they all require either bsn or 2+ years exp. it's getting depressing, having a $30,000 degree and not being able to get a job :/
  14. Visit  JRich profile page
    0
    I am an ADN RN. I obtained my degree in Minnesota. While I was in school I was working at a Sanford Hospital in Fargo, ND. Sanford will not hire ADN's in the hospital setting, but will in the clinic setting. There is also Essentia Health in the area. They will hire ADN's in the hospital setting. I did not want to stay in the MidWest though and moved down to the Houston, TX area. I found a job right away at a County Hospital down in the Houston area. I will be working in a cardiac chest pain urgent care. I think it all depends on the company you are applying too. I think County hospitals are much more willing to hire ADN's. I did get plenty of rejections from hospitals that claimed Magnet status and said their nurses NEED to have their BSN


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