What's REALLY with the hospitals using Magnet as a cover for wanting BSN only nurses? - page 18

by foreverLaur 33,516 Views | 175 Comments

I'm in an associate degree RN program. I have a previous BA in Psychology and just finished up my last two classes online to also get my BS in Business Administration. I have worked for over a year as a PCA at a local hospital... Read More


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    [QUOTE=avengingspirit1;7914788]Brandy,

    I've been told the same stories by many other nurses who all agree that "Magnet Status" is nothing more than a money-making scheme for the ANA and does nothing for the floor nurse or the patients. I've been told that nurses are required to go to perfunctory meetings that accomplish nothing just to satisfy Magnet requirements. As a result of Obamacare and because they can pay them less, there is a big push to have NPs and PAs to take on more of a primary care provider role. NPs and PAs are fine as long as they work in conjunction with and only as an extended arm of a licensed physician. The difference in the scope of education and training of NPs and PAs compared to that of an MD or DO is like night and day. NPs and PAs are not doctors and are never to be used as a replacement or substitute for a licensed physician. Also these urgent care and minute clinics are to never be used as a replacement for primary care from a doctor. I was glad to see the news media in Philadelphia cover this and warn people of the dangers of putting too much faith in these dime-store healthcare clinics.
    (QUOTE)

    Actually the creation of NP's were to allow advance practice RN's to work as primary care providers indept of Dr's because of the shortage of primary care doctors esp in rural areas. Therefore many state laws allow NP's to practice independently with full prescribing rights. The reality is many NP's work alongside doctors because they prefer a collaborative practice and do not want to be independent. Frankly the costs of running an independent practice hinder many NP's and Dr's from private practice and that is why hospitals, HMO's and insurance companies are now taking over private practice clinics. Yes the push for NP's and PA's is for practical, economical reasons because they cost half of what a Dr does. This will continue to be the trend because there is a huge financial disincentive for Dr's to work in primary care and the 10% increase in pay from medicare is not going to change things! Dr's go to school for many years, take out huge student loans these days and most are not going to go into the low paying primary care field. I wouldn't either and I don't blame them one bit! They certainly deserve better compensation for the sacrifices of all the years of education and to pay off their student loans.+
  2. 0
    Quote from avengingspirit1

    As a result of Obamacare and because they can pay them less, there is a big push to have NPs and PAs to take on more of a primary care provider role. NPs and PAs are fine as long as they work in conjunction with and only as an extended arm of a licensed physician. The difference in the scope of education and training of NPs and PAs compared to that of an MD or DO is like night and day. NPs and PAs are not doctors and are never to be used as a replacement or substitute for a licensed physician. Also these urgent care and minute clinics are to never be used as a replacement for primary care from a doctor. I was glad to see the news media in Philadelphia cover this and warn people of the dangers of putting too much faith in these dime-store healthcare clinics.
    Excellent point that I am glad to see someone making.
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    Back to the original topic.

    Just got back from a couple of job interviews that have given me insight. I get the impression it's due to the extensive training new nurses need. Places really don't want to be bothered. They want a finished product ready to work from day one. "There is the med room. There is the MAR. Now get to work." The assumption that with a BSN in hand you're able to learn faster thus decreasing training time plus you're not going to be distracted by needing to attend college classes.
    Last edit by Gentleman_nurse on May 17
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    Quote from NY_teach
    ...The assumption that with a BSN in hand you're able to learn faster thus decreasing training time plus you're not going to be distracted by needing to attend college classes.
    In my experience the common wisdom is the opposite, why do you think BSN's are "able to learn faster" or that they typically have a shorter training period. I've worked for two different hospitals that hired ADNs preferentially due to their decreased orientation/training requirements.
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    MunoRN

    It was the vibe I got from interviewers during the job search process. Whether or not I agree with it is another story.
    Last edit by Gentleman_nurse on May 18 : Reason: spelling
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    deleted
    Last edit by Gentleman_nurse on May 18 : Reason: deleted duplicate post


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