What is the real difference between ASN and BSN???

  1. 0
    I know that the BSN is a four year degree. Here in New Mexico, you have to be a RN for one year before the colleges will accept you into the BSN program. I am currently taking classes to get into the RN program at our Community College. When there are classes that will transfer to the BSN program, I take those. I am just wondering what the difference is in real life with a BSN degree. Any information will be appreciated. Thanks!
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  4. 10 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    In real life, in bedside nursing, there isn't a discernable difference between ASN/ADN & BSN nurses. I graduated with a BSN in '94, mightily concerned about my lack of clinical expertise. Our program director assured me & the rest of our class that we'd have our skills within a year...and I did. The following year, I worked with new grads from a local ADN program & they knocked my socks off. 2 of them were great nurses...the other ADNs were about as lost as I'd been when I started.

    The difference tends to come in when one wants to leave bedside nursing. Having the BSN made it possible to have the job that I currently have. It usually (but not always) opens more doors & provides more options than having an ASN/ADN.

    Good luck in your educational endeavors!

    Joy
  6. 0
    Thanks, that's kinda what I thought. I definately would like to have that option open to me. It's just so weird when you're just at the beginning stages of learning. Allnurses.com is a godsend! Thanks for taking the time to post to my question. I really do appreciate it.
  7. 0
    No problem. Glad to be of help! Allnurses.com is the place where many brains tackle lots of interesting problems!

    Joy
  8. 0
    2amigos,

    I think you may have been misinformed about BSN requirements - you do not need to be an RN unless you are referring to an "RN to BSN" program. Otherwise, the enrollment to a generic BSN is just like a community college. You take your prerequisites (about 30 hours) and then your nursing courses. Most of the time, the prerequisite classes you take at a community college are fully transferrable to BSN programs.

    Good luck & best wishes
  9. 0
    I believe ADN programs recieve more clinical experience. I went to an ADN( graduating in 2 weeks) We take the same board. I never understood the major discrpancy between the two. I plan to work a year and do the RN to Masters program. I will skip over the BSN. I need more core classes.
  10. 0
    One word: OPTIONS. As an ADN, you will be at the bedside. You may be a shift charge or NM, but to go any further than that, or to branch into education, research, etc., you need a BSN--MINIMUM!
  11. 0
    the difference could mean alot more money.
  12. 0
    Thanks for all the info! I really appreciate it everyone!
  13. 0
    Originally posted by lindagio
    I believe ADN programs recieve more clinical experience. I went to an ADN( graduating in 2 weeks) We take the same board. I never understood the major discrpancy between the two. I plan to work a year and do the RN to Masters program. I will skip over the BSN. I need more core classes.
    lindagio, I'm thinking of going that route too, RN to Masters someday.

    Congradulations on your upcoming Graduation !!

    Good Luck

    Marie


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