What is the real difference between ASN and BSN???

  1. 0 I know that the BSN is a four year degree. Here in New Mexico, you have to be a RN for one year before the colleges will accept you into the BSN program. I am currently taking classes to get into the RN program at our Community College. When there are classes that will transfer to the BSN program, I take those. I am just wondering what the difference is in real life with a BSN degree. Any information will be appreciated. Thanks!
  2. Enjoy this?

    Join thousands and get our weekly Nursing Insights newsletter with the hottest discussions, articles, and toons.

  3. Visit  2amigos profile page

    About 2amigos

    From 'New Mexico'; 56 Years Old; Joined Jul '02; Posts: 146.

    10 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  eltrip profile page
    0
    In real life, in bedside nursing, there isn't a discernable difference between ASN/ADN & BSN nurses. I graduated with a BSN in '94, mightily concerned about my lack of clinical expertise. Our program director assured me & the rest of our class that we'd have our skills within a year...and I did. The following year, I worked with new grads from a local ADN program & they knocked my socks off. 2 of them were great nurses...the other ADNs were about as lost as I'd been when I started.

    The difference tends to come in when one wants to leave bedside nursing. Having the BSN made it possible to have the job that I currently have. It usually (but not always) opens more doors & provides more options than having an ASN/ADN.

    Good luck in your educational endeavors!

    Joy
  5. Visit  2amigos profile page
    0
    Thanks, that's kinda what I thought. I definately would like to have that option open to me. It's just so weird when you're just at the beginning stages of learning. Allnurses.com is a godsend! Thanks for taking the time to post to my question. I really do appreciate it.
  6. Visit  eltrip profile page
    0
    No problem. Glad to be of help! Allnurses.com is the place where many brains tackle lots of interesting problems!

    Joy
  7. Visit  rbez profile page
    0
    2amigos,

    I think you may have been misinformed about BSN requirements - you do not need to be an RN unless you are referring to an "RN to BSN" program. Otherwise, the enrollment to a generic BSN is just like a community college. You take your prerequisites (about 30 hours) and then your nursing courses. Most of the time, the prerequisite classes you take at a community college are fully transferrable to BSN programs.

    Good luck & best wishes
  8. Visit  lindagio profile page
    0
    I believe ADN programs recieve more clinical experience. I went to an ADN( graduating in 2 weeks) We take the same board. I never understood the major discrpancy between the two. I plan to work a year and do the RN to Masters program. I will skip over the BSN. I need more core classes.
  9. Visit  prmenrs profile page
    0
    One word: OPTIONS. As an ADN, you will be at the bedside. You may be a shift charge or NM, but to go any further than that, or to branch into education, research, etc., you need a BSN--MINIMUM!
  10. Visit  shygirl profile page
    0
    the difference could mean alot more money.
  11. Visit  2amigos profile page
    0
    Thanks for all the info! I really appreciate it everyone!
  12. Visit  Mkue profile page
    0
    Originally posted by lindagio
    I believe ADN programs recieve more clinical experience. I went to an ADN( graduating in 2 weeks) We take the same board. I never understood the major discrpancy between the two. I plan to work a year and do the RN to Masters program. I will skip over the BSN. I need more core classes.
    lindagio, I'm thinking of going that route too, RN to Masters someday.

    Congradulations on your upcoming Graduation !!

    Good Luck

    Marie
  13. Visit  eltrip profile page
    0
    I have an idea or two to throw your way. Bear with me, please. I enjoy being a student. I remember thinking that I'd love to be a professional student, except that I wouldn't be able to support myself with it. Then I attended nursing school & acquired my BSN. Mind you, I already had a B.A. In English at that, with a minor in German. I took my prereqs, no problem. I was workin' full-time, takin' 17 hours & lovin' it. I pulled a 3.8 that semester. I had a 3.6 the following semester. Then I started my nursing classes. We lost 30% of the class in the first semester. I did fairly well & pulled a C out of that class. My grades improved over the following 3 semesters, but never reached as high as when I was taking my prerequisites. It positively wore me out, even with reducing my work hours to 30 per week.

    After I graduated, the thought of additional education became repulsive to me. I had absolutely no desire to go for my MSN & become an FNP as I'd dreamed of doing before. It's now been 8 years since I graduated and I'm finally looking at starting grad school. If I'd just gone for the ADN instead of BSN, I wouldn't have been eligible for my current position.

    These days I wish I'd just gone for the bridge program at Vanderbilt & gotten the MSN instead of going for the lower-cost option. I'd be finished with grad school & not looking at trying to parent, work, and go to school all while being the best wife possible AND be active in my church .

    Think about it. And, hey, I'm not judging anyone on their choices or opinions. This is just a point of view from where I sit.

    Have a blessed day, ya'll
    Joy


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top