What is the difference btwn. a bachelors vs. an associates? - page 2

I an going to a 4 year university, working on my BSN. What is the difference between LPN, RN, and CNA? Also, what is the difference in pay?:p... Read More

  1. by   Brittany_Shelly
    to those of you who have your BSN or ADN...I only have one prerequisite left before I can apply to ADN program...or I can take another year to finish the prerequisite courses for the BSN program. From what I have read the only reason to get your BSN is if you want to go on to get your masters and what not...I have no desire to go for a masters degree. Is it really worth it to work that much harder for the BSN? If it would truly make me a better nurse I would go for it...but otherwise I don't see the point...will I regret it later on?
  2. by   DoGoodThenGo
    Am going to try and break this down like a fraction! *LOL*

    Any decent ADN, AAS, Diploma or BSN program can produce good or even a great nurse. Half to three-quarters of the type of nurse one becomes anyway has more to do with the person than choice of school/program. As with school children, most nursing programs in the United States are geared towards the "test". In this instance the test in question is getting their students to pass the boards with the highest ratio. If one can get into a program, stay in, graduate and pass the boards, that is pretty much the "easy" part, next one has to become a nurse, and that is where the rubber meets the road.

    Associate degrees in general tend to be very limiting. Normally they prepare one for one specific career or job and it is hard to rise above or out of that position. Say this as one with an Associates degree in Fashion Buying and Merchandising from FIT, which got me pretty much no where. Applying for any sort of job outside of fashion or related industries always got the same response "why aren't you working in fashion", or "your education does not meet the requirements for the position....".

    A BSN is a four year college degree, and all that comes with it. Should one decide to leave nursing, an ADN degree may limit one choices. Indeed in some areas an ADN degree may ones movement away from anything but bedside nursing. Even there, as more and more hospitals seek "Magnet" status, increasing numbers of such clinical settings are moving towards an all BSN staff.

    Now I hear all you chuckling out there. Yes, all BSN staffing has been tried before, and normally it does fail and hospitals have to go back to ADN/Diploma grads to beef up staffing levels. However consider that many hospitals are learning to do more with less, even with nursing service. A huge and diverse array of technicians are slowly slicing off parts of what where once strictly licensed RN functions. If the trend holds true, soon we shall have what many nursing professional organizations have long advocated; a RN (BSN) at the head of the nursing "team" , supervising a litany of technicians and *lower* grade nurses.

    If one can swing the time and funds, I say go for the BSN the first time around, and be done with it. If nothing else if you graduate and find the profession is not for you, at least you will have employment options.

    DGTG
  3. by   PMFB-RN
    Just to add to the confusion, an ADN nurse can also be a BSN nurse. There are hundreds and hundreds of programs for ADNs to get their BSN, inlcuding many that are all online. In many cases a nurse can go from ADN to BSN in the same total number of years / semesters as a traditional BSN. Getting and ADN presents no disadvantage what-so-ever as every ADN nurse can go on to get their BSN. In those areas where the ADN programs are set up to take 3 or even 4 years then I can't see why one wouldn't go directly to a BSN program. Here in Wisconsin the ADN program is actually set up to take 2 years total, but many of the programs have long waiting lists, some do not. In a case where one can actually get their ADN at a community college is two years then the ADN is at a big advantage over the BSN new grad. Here is why.
    In two years one can get their ADN and start working as an RN. Many hospitals, including the one where I work (one of the reason I chose to work here) have a program in place to pay or help pay for a BSN degree. Two years to get an ADN at community college prices (in Wisconsin about $6K total), work for two years while getting a BSN part time with the hospital footing all or part of the bill. So at the end of 4 years you are an RN with a BSN, two solid years experience as an RN, and will have made something like $80-$120K over the two years as an RN and should have no or very little debt. VS a traditional BSN grad who at the end of 4 years is also a RN with a BSN but has no experience at all and likely owes a lots of money in student loans.
  4. by   soxgirl2008
    PMFB-RN - I'm really glad you posted that! I'm also in Wisconsin and am starting an ADN program soon because I don't have the means to go into a BSN program right now (Any program close to me is a private school or I'd have to move/live in dorms and I don't have the money for that) but I was planning to do what you talked about (having a hospital hopefully help pay for my BSN) Just glad to hear that there will still be hope for me as an ADN grad!
  5. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from soxgirl2008
    PMFB-RN - I'm really glad you posted that! I'm also in Wisconsin and am starting an ADN program soon because I don't have the means to go into a BSN program right now (Any program close to me is a private school or I'd have to move/live in dorms and I don't have the money for that) but I was planning to do what you talked about (having a hospital hopefully help pay for my BSN) Just glad to hear that there will still be hope for me as an ADN grad!
    *** The Wisconsin Technical colleges are great and they provide a high qualiety nursing education at a very reasonable cost. You are at no disadvantage at all by going the Tech college route. Only problem with them is the waiting list to get in to he programs. I went to Southwest Tech in Fennimore and at the time I went there was no waiting list. They also have a part time evening and weekend program that takes twice as long but is part time for those who must continue to work full time. There is no waiting list for the part time program.
    I was able to get my BSN in 18 months online after nursing school and the hospital paid for the whole thing. However the hospital where I work just ended that program.
  6. by   Alternator81
    Quote from starfrek1
    Simple as this. BSN- more theroy, ADN- more clinicals
    I'm sorry but it is simply NOT TRUE that ADN/ASN grads have more clinical time or clinical experience than BSN graduates. The state board of nursing has specific requirements pertaining to the number of clinical hours in order for accreditation. Although it may be hard for some to believe, BSN students aren't magically exempt for clinical hours.

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