What do you think about BSN?

  1. Let's keep aside the mandatory BSN by 2020...(supposedly based on a study, that come to the conclusion that something like there were 0.002% higher survival chances of MI patients if solely BSN nurses were taking care of them. )

    Is BSN better nurse than Associate degree nurse?
    And if you really believe that BSN are better, what is it that makes BSN nurse better?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from DNTcode
    Let's keep aside the mandatory BSN by 2020...(supposedly based on a study, that come to the conclusion that something like there were 0.002% higher survival chances of MI patients if solely BSN nurses were taking care of them. )
    NO mandatory BSN, that's been circulating for decades now.
    Study you're referring to is the Aiken study (your stats, don't know where that came from though).

    This thread is interesting if you'd like to know more: Critique of Study: More BSNs equal better pt outcomes

    Is BSN better nurse than Associate degree nurse?
    "Better"? No. More educated if comparing an individual with an Associate degree only with a Bachelor degree only, naturally. But the main issue with the Aiken study was that it didn't account for all those years Diploma nurses gained experience, Associate degree nurses gained experience, BEFORE obtaining a Bachelor degree in nursing. Apples, take a look at the oranges. Yer not the same ;-)

    A brand new ASN and a brand new BSN together on orientation, both are like fresh puppies who have a ton to learn
  4. by   Simplistic
    There have been TONS of topics about this already..
  5. by   DNTcode
    You are right!! Thank you for stating more information! Just to explain: the statistic is not exact, first of all, I did not remember exactly but I recall it was ridiculously low number, so I wrote ...something like... just to clarify why there is such a absurd number. (as the real one is not so absurd, perhaps?)
  6. by   DNTcode
    Ok... and I can't refresh on the topic, if anything changed, or anyone still feels to add anything to it? Feel free to ignore and omit any topics that are abundant..
  7. by   amoLucia
    Is this a school homework assignment?
  8. by   DNTcode
    Nope, just trying to find out how does nurses feel about it.
    I seen ASNs, I seen BSN fresh grads at ICU (and except inflating their overconfidence they have nothing to back up with, BSNs truly did not show any advantage compare to ASN's).
    At the same time, I see lot of experience nurses... being grounded because they do not have BSN,
    some giving up and trying to do their BSN... after 25 years in nursing, where they actually are sharper then two NP's...
    I personally feel this is ridiculous bad joke, or maybe scheme how to make nurses more miserable, as they have to pay for it, and sacrifice so much time...
    I do not know, I just wanted to see, if there are other people who feel same, or if I am just an alien.
  9. by   Rose_Queen
    I'll bite. I work with diploma, ADN, and BSN degreed nurses. All of them are competent nurses. All three routes are valid entry to practice. Here's where I think the issue is: the fact that there are three routes for entry to practice is one of the reasons nursing may not be as respected as other healthcare professions. Pharmacists have standardized their entry to be a Pharm.D. Physical therapists are required to graduate with a DTP. Several other professions have standardized entry level degrees- and many of them are higher degrees. Should nursing move to requiring a BSN for entry level practice? Maybe. It sure would do away with the degree wars seen here and elsewhere. My thoughts are that if that happens, it needs to be done in a way that respects those nurses who have been practicing for years. Canada made the change to BScN for entry to practice, but grandfathered in all of those already licensed (and those already in school, if I remember correctly).

    Bottom line is that a nurse is a nurse. We all passed the same licensure exam. We all hold the same license, follow the same scope of practice, and are held to the same professional standards. Any nurse of any degree level can be a great nurse. Any nurse of any degree level can be an incompetent or downright dangerous nurse.
  10. by   amoLucia
    Nicely said, Rose Queen. Probably one of the best comments re the differences in a long time.
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Some nurses are better than others...but it normally has nothing to do with the type of degree they hold.

    Other factors such as work ethic, competence, proficiency in procedural skills, good communication skills, critical thinking, and experiential level all play roles in the crafting of nurses who might be 'better' than their counterparts.
  12. by   RunnerNurse09
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    I'll bite. I work with diploma, ADN, and BSN degreed nurses. All of them are competent nurses. All three routes are valid entry to practice. Here's where I think the issue is: the fact that there are three routes for entry to practice is one of the reasons nursing may not be as respected as other healthcare professions. Pharmacists have standardized their entry to be a Pharm.D. Physical therapists are required to graduate with a DTP. Several other professions have standardized entry level degrees- and many of them are higher degrees. Should nursing move to requiring a BSN for entry level practice? Maybe. It sure would do away with the degree wars seen here and elsewhere. My thoughts are that if that happens, it needs to be done in a way that respects those nurses who have been practicing for years. Canada made the change to BScN for entry to practice, but grandfathered in all of those already licensed (and those already in school, if I remember correctly).

    Bottom line is that a nurse is a nurse. We all passed the same licensure exam. We all hold the same license, follow the same scope of practice, and are held to the same professional standards. Any nurse of any degree level can be a great nurse. Any nurse of any degree level can be an incompetent or downright dangerous nurse.
    I absolutely agree, and I think experience, drive and work ethic count for alot. And I also agree that as health care professionals, we need to be at the same level as our team members , such as physical therapists and the like. No, not everyone needs a doctorate, but maybe the entry level degree should be a bsn.
  13. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from DNTcode
    I seen ASNs, I seen BSN fresh grads at ICU (and except inflating their overconfidence they have nothing to back up with, BSNs truly did not show any advantage compare to ASN's).


    Separate from how hospitals or nurses view education is the confidence instilled by nurses in their patients and families. Patients usually don't care about the degree. They want to feel that their nurses are knowledgeable and competent. They will lose confidence in a nurse who seems timid or cannot answer their questions, or fumbles around with equipment. Communication skills are very important, both written (the chart is a legal document that can be used against you in a lawsuit) and spoken. You risk losing your credibility if you do not eliminate the use of "I seen" in your speech and writing. Something as simple and basic as that can make a tremendous impression on hiring managers, colleagues, and patients.

    The value of the BSN is largely market dependent. Degree is completely irrelevant in many markets. In others, the nurse is usually given a fair amount of time (and tuition assistance) to get it done. Easy online degree mills abound. I think the "controversy" is completely overblown.

    There is no 2020 BSN mandate.
  14. by   newmail445
    There's literally a thread going on right now about this topic with around 5x more comments (more active). Check that for a nice conversation that includes some nurse friendly free market economics.

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